Items tagged with Leap-Motion

Earlier this month we covered a great project called MotionSavvy that seeks to help deaf people communicate better with the hearing using Leap Motion technology that converts sign language into audible speech. Another company working to deliver essentially the same service--also with Leap Motion--reached out to let us know what they’re up to. The company is called BabyTaxi, and founder Tarik Sayeed told us that they’re six months ahead of MotionSavvy in terms of a product release. “We actually have 30 transactional sentences completed”, he said. “Happy to report that... Read more...
Perhaps it’s stating the obvious, but deaf people can have a difficult time communicating with hearing people. The easiest method of interaction is sign language, but unless you or a loved one regularly use it, you probably don’t know how to communicate in ASL (American Sign Language). Thus, deaf people often must resort to a time-consuming back-and-forth with hearing people using pen and paper. The below video paints the picture well: MotionSavvy is working on a much better solution using Leap Motion technology. In a nutshell, with a leap motion controller attached to a tablet, a user... Read more...
It was nearly a year ago that Leap Motion first snagged a deal with ASUS that saw the Leap Motion controller shipping with some of the company’s laptops and desktops, but things have really picked up for Leap Motion in the last few months. In September, HP opted to bake the motion-controller maker’s technology into the Intel Haswell-based HP Envy 17 Leap Motion SE (after previously adding it to select PCs), and now HP is rolling out a whole fleet of machines packing Leap Motion’s tech. There are 11 total computer models shipping with the option for adding a special HP USB Leap... Read more...
Months after promising to embed Leap Motion technology into select PCs, HP has delivered with the HP Envy 17 Leap Motion Special Edition (SE). Leap Motion developed technology that lets the user control the computer with two hands and ten fingers moving through the air. You can buy a Leap Motion controller outright, but this is the first time the technology has shipped on board a PC. The controller is embedded in a “little speed bump in the wrist rest area” just to the right of trackpad, and judging from the video that HP posted of the technology in action, it looks like the Leap Motion... Read more...
The likes of Kickstarter and Indiegogo have become the land where dreams are born (or are crushed), and yet another intrepid group of techies-come-entrepreneurs is looking to raise money via crowdfunding. Flowton Technologies is a group that makes a “natural interface” controller for the home that allows users to control things with voice and gesture, and they need $150,000 to get from prototype to production. With the Flowton Controller, you’ll be able to walk into your house, say “I’m home”, and turn the lights on; control your TV with gestures in the air;... Read more...
Tesla CEO Elon Musk (who we could safely call a futurist at this, can’t we?) has more on his mind that just cars and 4,000 MPH Hyperloop transportation systems. He also tweeted his intention of developing a hand-manipulated hologram design engine and promised to post a video of designing a rocket part with only hand gestures and printing the part in titanium. I can’t believe I just typed that sentence. The video is up, and here it is: Musk showed a wireframe of the rocket part, and he was able to rotate the 3D object on a screen with one hand, and with a second hand, he zoomed in and... Read more...
The Leap Motion controller has nothing on this thing; Haptix is a project that, simply put, is designed to turn any surface into a multitouch surface. (Get it? Haptics.) Ostensibly, this allows for input in more ways, and it opens up more possibilities for user customization. The Haptix team sees the device as combining the traditional mouse/keyboard input method with touch and getting the best of both worlds. The device itself is a small, silver bar that clips onto or rests on just about anything. It “reads” your finger movements and inputs accordingly. It can be used for everything... Read more...
Leap Motion, a company that makes motion control technology, starting gaining attention earlier this year when it scored a couple of deals with manufacturers and Best Buy as well as making its own Leap Motion Controller and opening a beta program for app developers. The fruits of those labors begin the harvest today, as Leap Motion opens up its Airspace app store on the heels of shipping out preordered Leap Motion controllers last week. There are 75 apps in the store for today’s launch, and the hundreds of thousands of Leap Motion users will be able to download and launch them right away... Read more...
Leap Motion has making a bit of noise in the computer industry, snagging a partnership with ASUS to bundle its controller with PCs, getting it onto Best Buy shelves, and embedding its technology into some HP PCs, but the company is still building up to its July 22nd release, when it will bring a polished version of the controller to consumers. A host of compatible apps will accompany the release, it seems. Developers in the Leap Motion Controller beta program will be able to get busy working with the device for the next month or so. Leap Motion says that the number of developers is in the thousands,... Read more...
Leap Motion is an intriguing new product that’s been making friends with major device manufacturers, and now the technology has landed in Google Earth, as well. Google announced that with the release of Google Earth 7.1, users will be able to navigate the world with Leap Motion’s 3D controller. Leap Motion posted this tasty preview of the Google Earth plus Leap Motion pairing in action: The support is available on PC, Mac, and Linux versions of Google Earth, and Leap Motion dev community--which reportedly numbers around 10,000--will be the first to get to play with the new feature,... Read more...
Leap Motion is hustling; after securing a bundling deal with ASUS and announcing the availability of its standalone gesture controller later this spring, the company announced that its technology will be embedded into select HP computers. This summer, HP will offer the same sort of bundling deal that ASUS offers, where the Leap Motion controller will ship with certain PCs; however, at some point in the relatively near future, HP will embed Leap Motion technology into HP devices, which is significant. Which devices will get the Leap Motion treatment and when remains to be seen. As part of the bundling... Read more...
Forget touch input, with everything it offers and how it can change the way people interact with their computers; ASUS is looking to leap ahead of touch input by bundling motion control technology from Leap Motion with some high end laptops and all-in-one desktops yet this year. Leap Motion claims that its technology can track movements of all ten fingers down to 1/100th millimeter in a 150-degree area with no visible lag, at 290 FPS. Currently, Leap Motion offers a $70 controller (for preorder) about the size of a man’s thumb that delivers the motion control capabilities, and from the language... Read more...