Items tagged with Kno

Intel has a sharp focus on the education sector as of late, whether you consider their program supporting universities and higher education with their Arduino-compatible Galileo development board for the new Quark X1000 SoC, their 7 and 10-inch Education Tablet initiative, or their latest acquisition of Kno, an education software start-up that claims they're "on a mission to Change The Way Students Learn." Adding over 225,000 higher education and K- 12 titles and content with 75 educational publishers to their portfolio, Intel sees technology in the classroom as a critical new frontier; and it... Read more...
Will your Kno arrive in time for a Christmas unwrapping? Maybe! Kno, Inc. just announced that their educational tablet will start shipping this week, with some early arrivals also scheduled for this week. You had to order pretty early in order to have yours ship already, but at least the gears are now turning. The Kno is one of the most unique tablets on the market, but it's obviously designed for a different market segment. Those in the education field obviously have very different needs than typical consumers, and the 14.1" touch screen is proof that this is no ordinary tablet. While loads of... Read more...
There are plenty of tablet options on the market, and plenty more coming. Part of that "coming" crowd is a company called Kno, which is designing tablets primarily for use in the education sector. Their tablets have largely been seen as too big to be used by regular consumers hoping to accomplish regular consumer tablet tasks, but a large screen (or two, in the case of their dual-screen model) is perfect for showing off graphs and other textbook items. The company has been trickling information on these out for some time now, but the most vital point has yet to be disclosed. Until today. Kno will... Read more...
Kno announced a single screen version of its tablet textbook. Kno combines a touchscreen tablet with digital textbooks, course materials, web access, digital media, and note taking capabilities. With the single screen version, Kno is hoping to reach students that may not be interested in or able to purchase the dual screen model. The company plans to ship both the single and two-screen tablet textbooks by the end of this year. Kno Breaks New Ground with the World’s First Single Screen Tablet Textbook Kno Continues the Pace of Innovation in Integrated Learning with a Smaller Version of the... Read more...
Synopsis:  When the new Core i7 processors arrive sometime later this month, pricing for the flagship Core i7 Extreme 965 will be set at $999, the Core i7 940 at $562, and the Core i7 920 at $284.  Expect enthusiast-class X58 based motherboards to sell for around $300 give or take a few dollars depending on the number of features.  Ultimately, we can't help but be impressed by the new Core i7 processors. The performance, power profile, and overclockability are all very good even at this early stage.  Intel clearly has another exceptionally strong... Read more...
Much to the chagrin of teachers and librarians, Wikipedia has become a primary source of research and information for many seeking answers to questions with just a few quick key presses and mouse clicks. Since its debut in 2001, Wikipedia has outgrown other objective informational sites, such as About.com and Encyclopedia Britannica Online Encyclopedia.Now Internet bellwether, Google, is looking to compete with Wikipedia for the hearts and minds of online information seekers with its new product, Knol. Google defines a Knol as "a unit of knowledge" and "Knols are authoritative articles about specific... Read more...
I don't know about you, but I feel fine. Viacom doesn't. It sued Google, the owner of YouTube, for  $1 billion for copyright infringement. Google, in turn, doesn't feel fine either, because Viacom can sue them even though they claim they have made every attempt to comply with the DMCA. According to Google, the suit threatens the very existence of the sharing of any information on the Internet.{Google] said YouTube was faithful to the requirements of the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act, saying the federal law was intended to protect companies like YouTube as long as they responded properly... Read more...
The New York Times looked at the Pew Internet and American Life Project's profile of young Internet users, and to their surprise, they discovered that teenage girls outnumber teenage boys in writing blogs and webpages, and building or working on social networking sites.  The only category of Internet activity where boys lead is posting more videos, by a factor of two to one.“Most guys don’t have patience for this kind of thing,” said Nicole Dominguez, 13, of Miramar, Fla., whose hobbies include designing free icons, layouts and “glitters” (shimmering animations) for the Web and MySpace pages... Read more...
I'm a big fan of Wikipedia. It's easy to find foolish or inaccurate things on it of course, but on the whole it's a fantastic and useful utility. If you do a lot of websearches on Google, you'll notice that Wikipedia has become a sort of default top of the page result for a lot of queries. That might be set for a big change, now that Google itself appears to be gearing up to have a Wikipedia of their own. Earlier this week, we started inviting a selected group of people to try a new, free tool that we are calling "knol", which stands for a unit of knowledge. Our goal is to encourage people who... Read more...
Well, I assume they do. They seem to know more about it than anybody. In a breakthrough paper  delivered in the Optics Express journal, IBM has demonstrated their method for greatly improving the  transfer of information between multiple computer chip cores, substituting  optical signals sent through silicon for electrical pulses sent through copper wire.  By greatly shrinking the size of the optical router, or modulator, IBM claims they'll be able to shrink a supercomputer-grade machine down to laptop size. A major challenge for scientists is finding a way to improve communication... Read more...
Hitachi makes personal computers? Well, they did; but now they don't. Hitachi announced today they are ceasing manufacturing of most kinds of personal computers.  Hitachi is already outsourcing the production of their business computers to Hewlett-Packard, and will continue to sell them under the Hitachi nameplate."We will not develop normal, consumer-use personal computers and will focus our resources on new products, namely televisions with PC functions or PCs that can show television programs," he said. Hitachi will maintain production of special business-use computers, such as ones without... Read more...
On October 22nd, innovative memory chipmaker SanDisk is rolling out its TakeTV, a big ole flash memory drive that loads television shows or movies from your computer and plays them on your television. It uses a cradle for their drive that you hook up to your television, and allows you to simply scroll through a menu of available files to play them. It's offering content, too, through a video download service they call Fanfare. For David Poltrack, president of CBS Vision, the TV broadcaster's research division, it's a matter of getting the networks' programming in places that consumers will use... Read more...
The UK's Barclays Bank is beginning to use two factor authentification for transactions online to combat fraud. They are supplying 500,000 customers with a PINsentry device that would make it imposible for a phishing scam to clean out your bank account by simply getting their hands on your log-in password. While broadly welcomed, many in the industry have been concerned at the slow introduction of two-factor authentication. "It has taken banks a while to get round to tokens because it is a cost to them," said Tony Redmond, chief technology officer at HP Services and HP Security.... Read more...
If you have an e-mail box you know what spam is by now.  With the recent arrest of Robert "Spam King" Soloway, there's been no lack of information and/or opinions on the web about spam in general.  Most of it, like this Wired story, covers why the legal system isn't really making a big dent.It's certainly a good read if you have the time, here's a tidbit to get you started: "I believe the answer will lie in following the money. Spammers send spam because it is profitable. When the messages are touting snake-oil cures or illegal pharmaceuticals, someone is banking the dollars from the people who... Read more...
1 2 Next