Items tagged with ISP

We've covered the NSA revelations and subsequent government petitions at some length, but here's a new twist to the story of the government's pervasive monitoring program -- a view of the activity from an ISP's perspective. According to Pete Ashdown, the CEO of XMission, a Utah ISP, the company received its first FISA warrant "request" in 2010. There's no way to challenge FISA warrants and no legal recourse -- so Ashdown had no choice but to install a server, one of the NSA's own machines, in their data center. The technical aspects of the situation are remarkably straightforward. The NSA sent... Read more...
When Google first unveiled its 1Gbit fiber Internet service last summer, it seemed unlikely that such speeds would become common anytime soon. However, there was great hope that with Google's pressure, other ISPs would be pushed towards offering their own 1Gbit services. This past April, we did see some evidence of that, with AT&T promising to roll out its own 1Gbit service in the Austin, Texas area. Things don't stop there. It seems that some of the biggest ISPs are being seriously slow to catch onto the 1Gbit option, with Verizon charging a staggering $210 in some areas for a 300Mbit/s connection.... Read more...
Whether or not Google launched its Google Fiber Internet service as a legitimate business venture or as a massive trolling measure to shake up the broadband market (as some believe), its effect has been evident in how ISPs are competing. Leveraging a partnership with the city of Seattle and its fiber optic network, Gigabit Squared (or “GB2”, for short) is rolling out “ultra high speed fiber” gigabit Internet service to several Seattle neighborhoods in 2014. The cost will be $80 per month, and with that subscription GB2 will waive the $350 construction fee. That’s $10... Read more...
You know, this is finally starting to feel like a trend. And it's certainly a trend we're happy to get behind. The trend of high(er)-speed Internet is seemingly sweeping the developed world, with fiber-based solutions and ISPs offering 1Gbps+ speeds becoming less of an exception compared to yesteryear. Now, even customers Down Under will soon be able to enjoy the blistering speeds that folks in Kansas City already have access to. Australians will soon be able to thank NBN for installing 1Gbps access, as the network is set to go live prior to the end of 2013. To put this in perspective, a 1Gbps... Read more...
A few years ago, when Google was determining which city to launch its pilot Google Fiber program, cities all over the country went all-out trying to persuade the search giant to bring all that fantastical bandwidth to their neck of the woods. And with good reason: Google Fiber offers gigabit Internet speeds and even TV service, all at prices that meet or beat the competition. In fact, the lowest tier of Google Fiber service (5Mbps down, 1Mbps up) is free once users pay a $300 construction fee. Eventually, Kansas City was the lucky locale chosen for the Google Fiber launch, and by all accounts things... Read more...
We've said it in the past, and we'll say it again: if there are two mainstream tech industries that could use a disruption, it's cable TV and broadband Internet. Google is actually doing a fair job of disrupting both, and if you had any worries about Google investing in Fiber for Kansas City and then forgetting all about it... let this calm those fears. Google has just announced that its Fiber initiative is going over so well, that it'll soon be expanding. Olathe, Kansas is a nearby suburb of the metro Kansas City region, and it's actually known as "Silicon Prairie" in some parts. This week, the... Read more...
Google Fiber is, in a word, awesome. In addition to bringing unprecedented Internet speeds to a few lucky areas in Kansas City (at an attractive price point no less), the presence of the service has apparently been attracting startups to the area and has people calling it the “Silicon Prairie”. Google is also on the record as saying that Google Fiber is not just a one-off thing; it will spread to more locales and will no doubt foster growth in those places, as well. And perhaps it’s obvious, but Google Fiber may be a problem for competing ISPs. For example, The Consumerist posted... Read more...
Content delivery company Akamai has just issued its Q3 2012 "State of the Internet" report, and with it comes some promising signs that "high broadband" Internet connections are on the up. The report doesn't mention what caused the growth, but between Q2 and Q3 of last year, the number of people equipped with a 10Mbit/s+ connection rose 8.8% to settle in at 11%. A major gain for certain, and one that leads us to highly anticipate the company's next report to see if the trend continues. Overall, however, things are still a little depressing on the speed front. 41% of the the users Akamai was able... Read more...
It's a well-known fact, outside of China's walls, that China is one of the tougher places to truly indulge in the full Internet. A nationwide filter prevents easy access to places like Twitter and Facebook, as well as certain images that the government deems unsuitable for citizens to view for one reason or another. In other words, surfing in China is like surfing a partial Internet. Sadly, China's ways aren't entirely unique, as many other nations in the Middle East utilize similar filtering to blind its citizens from certain things. But now, it appears that surfing the 'net in China is about... Read more...
For too long, the download/upload speeds advertised by ISPs fell far short of real-world performance, but things have been improving of late. According to the FCC’s “Measuring Broadband America” 2012 report, ISPs were delivering an average of 96% of advertised speeds during peak traffic times, which is up significantly from the 87% speed found in the the August 2011 report. The good news doesn’t stop there; the report found that five ISPs were actually “routinely meeting or exceeding advertised rates”. Average Peak Period and 24-Hour Sustained Download Speeds... Read more...
It’s a long-running joke that most of us use our phones to make phone calls rather rarely, opting instead to use them for texting, Web browser, games, productivity, and social media more often. Perhaps that’s partly why AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson suggested this week that data-only wireless plans are likely coming within two years. According to CBS News, instead of having separate options and pricing for calls, texts, and data, mobile carriers will fold all three into one “data” plan. AT&T isn’t necessarily saying that it’s developing such a plan, but... Read more...
Good news if you get your Internet service through Bright House Networks, Cablevision, Comcast, Cox Communications, or Time Warner Cable: You just got free access to about 50,000 WiFi hotspots. The quintet of cable ISPs announced that they’ve partnered to provide free WiFi hotspot access to all of their combined customers under the network name “CableWiFi”. Currently, Bright House and Cablevision have CableWiFi networks set up in NYC and in central Florida. Over the next few months, more networks from all five participating ISPs will pop up throughout public places such as malls,... Read more...
Net neutrality. Throttling. Shaping. Data discrimination. Lots of weird terms, and plenty of headaches for Internet users. ISPs are looking to all sorts of methods in order to curb usage and abuse where possible, but Bell Canada is taking a rather unusual approach. But now, according to a letter to Canadian Radio-Television and Telecommunications Commission, the ISP has decided to "withdraw the shaping of P2P traffic" on their networks starting March 1st. Here's the reasoning: With the increasing popularity of streamed video and other traffic, P2P file-sharing, as a proportion of total traffic,... Read more...
A major ruling from the European Court of Justice found that an ISP is not responsible for monitoring Web traffic for illegal downloads. The ruling was in a case between European ISP Scarlet Extended SA and an organization responsible for authorizing the use of musical works called SABAM. SABAM discovered that users were using P2P sites to illegally download works in its catalog. SABAM managed to get a Belgian court to order Scarlet to--somehow--end the P2P piracy, under threat of penalties. ECJ Buildings Predictably, Scarlet appealed the ruling, using the argument that asking it to effectively... Read more...
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