Items tagged with ioDrive

SanDisk has announced the release of third-generation Fusion ioDrive PCIe and Mezzanine flash cards, in doing so marking the first integration of SanDisk NAND flash and Virtual Storage Layer (VSL) software into the ioMemory product line since the company acquired Fusion-io in June 2014 for $1.1 billion. Flash technology has moved significantly forward since the SanDisk's acquisition of Fusion, with smaller geometries and denser dies, all of which mean more flash capacity can now be placed on a PCIe flash card with performance raised and/or prices cut. Which explains why SanDisk is saying that their... Read more...
Fusion-io announced TPC-H benchmark results today in a bid to raise its own visibility and promote solid-state storage as an alternative solution in the enterprise market. The company's PCI-Express-based products turned in a score of 28,772 Queries per Hour on a 100GB database, for a price/performance metric of $1.47 per database transaction. That's sufficient to rank third on TPC's price/performance list of vendors, and the company is quick to point out that it hit its performance target with just four "drives." As we discussed in our review from a few weeks ago, each Fusion ioDrive plugs into... Read more...
We've certainly heard of Fusion-io's bleeding edge PCI Express-based SSD solution but to date haven't yet gotten the chance to check it out on the test bench here at HotHardware.  In addition, though we've put Intel's wonderfully fast X25-M SSD through its paces in stand-alone testing, imagine what it would be like with up to four drives in RAID 0.  You see where we're going here, a battle royal of what is arguably some of the fastest SSD storage technology money can buy right now.  So the stage is set but before we get into ripping up benchmarks, let's expand on what we think might... Read more...
Disruptive technology; it's a term thrown around these days by industry marketing types and quite frankly it's just plain getting worn out as of late.  In the mid 90s, a Harvard Business School Professor coined this phrase to describe a product innovation that breaks current convention and exceeds market expectations so vastly that market leaders might not see it coming and perhaps even the market itself doesn't know how to react.  Since the term was brought forth, there were many innovations over the years that overzealous marketing types have hailed as "disruptive technologies," though... Read more...