Items tagged with Internet-of-Things

Yesterday at IoT World 2015 in San Francisco Samsung debuted ARTIK, a set of new technologies centered on tiny circuit boards crammed with processing and communications components that they designed to juke developers to create and configure new Internet of Things (IoT) devices, such as personal trackers, drones, robots, security systems, and the like. Of course, Samsung also intends to enhance their own product lines with ARTIK, including televisions, home appliances, and smartphones.   In a blog post Samsung said of their new platform, "ARTIK provides a platform for developers who simply... Read more...
A company called littleBits has taken the hobby DIY kit to a whole new level with its Internet of Things-friendly cloudBit and Cloud Starter Bundle that allow you to add connected intelligence to any number of otherwise “dumb” items. The $59 cloudBit is designed to work without any need for wires or soldering, and it’s technically its own tiny computer board running Linux and packed with a FreeScale i.MX23 ARM926EJ-S processor, 64MB of RAM, a 4GB SD card, and an 802.11b/g USB adapter. There are also ADC and DAC I/O pins, as well as GPIO. littleBits mentioned a number of applications... Read more...
The Internet of Things promises big things, but to get past the theoretical stage, companies need to develop practical solutions to major obstacles, not the least of which is finding a way for devices running on different platforms to communicate effectively. Microsoft and 50 other companies have teamed up on the AllSeen Alliance to develop open source solutions for IoT interoperability, but that’s not the only group doing that sort of work; major industry players have created the Open Interconnect Consortium, as well. The OIC currently consists of Dell, Intel, and Samsung as well as Atmel,... Read more...
Following Google’s initial foray into the connected home front with the acquisition of Nest is an acquisition of Dropcam, a startup that makes a cloud-based WiFi video monitoring service. Rumors had emerged a few weeks ago that this was happening, but now the deal is going through for $555 million. According to the Wall Street Journal, Nest co-founder Matt Rogers confirmed that the company is paying cash for Dropcam. The deal will close pending regulatory approval. There are, of course, concerns over any Google-owned products and services in the connected home because of the search giant’s... Read more...
Whuh-oh. In the quest to conquer the Internet of Things (IoT), Google’s Nest just had a hiccup; Nest Protect Smoke + CO Alarms are being “recalled” by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission due to an alert failure problem. The issue is that the Nest Wave feature, in which a user can wave his or her arms near a unit to cancel a manual test or silence an alarm, can accidentally cancel a real alarm during an emergency. We put “recalled” in quotes because users don’t actually have to send the units back; they’re not faulty, they just need a software update... Read more...
Intel’s first quarter earnings report shows some uneven results across the company’s market segments and vast product portfolio, with a particular drop on the mobile side. Intel’s Mobile and Communications Group had a revenue of $156 million, but that was 52% from last quarter and down 61% year-over-year. In fact, sequentially, Intel’s revenue was down in most areas: its PC Client group was down 8%; the Data Center group was down 5%; the Internet of Things group was down 10%; and software and services dropped 6%. However, year-over-year the numbers are much rosier. With... Read more...
The Internet of Things is coming, and there are increasing numbers of products designed to make the IoT reality more feasible and easier to build for. Enter The HIO Project, which offers an open hardware platform that features a tiny mainboard rocking Freescale i.MX6 ARM Cortex A9 processor technology. The premier portion of the project is the HIO-EMB-1200 mainboard which Habey USA describes as “a Post-it sized, Lego-like ARM based open modular platform for rapid prototyping, quick application module development, and fast time to market”. The board is just 72mm x 80mm and includes the... Read more...
Now we’re talking: Cisco is putting up hundreds of thousands of dollars in an effort to deliver the security solutions necessary to protect the growing wave of connected devices in the Internet of Things. IoT security is a huge deal, both because of the potential disasters that could befall individuals, businesses, and cities with unprotected smart devices and also because to date there are essentially no security measures in place for connected devices that aren’t computers, smartphones, or tablets. (Case in point is the now nearly legendary refrigerator hack. A refrigerator! Hacked!)... Read more...
Freescale Semiconductor announced its smallest-yet MCU, and it’s destined for the many objects in the growing Internet of Things (IoT) trend. The Kinetis KL03 MCU is a 32-bit chip based on ARM, and it promises lower power requirements in smaller devices than existing solutions. “When size is no longer a barrier to incorporating microcontrollers into edge node devices, we can start to redefine what’s possible for the Internet of Things,” said Rajeev Kumar, Freescale’s director of worldwide marketing and business development in a press release. The Kinetis KL03 MCU includes... Read more...
Belkin has an intriguing suite of WeMo-branded smart devices for home automation, including light switches, motion detectors, integration with appliances, and more, but security firm IOActive recently discovered multiple vulnerabilities in WeMo--vulnerabilities that Belkin says it has now patched. Belkin’s statement on the subject reads in part: Belkin has corrected the list of five potential vulnerabilities affecting the WeMo line of home automation solutions that was published in a CERT advisory on February 18. Belkin was in contact with the security researchers prior to the publication... Read more...
Google’s quest to purchase Nest, maker of smart, connected thermostats and smoke detectors, is complete. The search giant’s $3.2 acquisition has been approved, per a Google regulatory filing. The move brings Nest and all of its human resources, most notably former Apple senior VP Tony Fadell, under the Google umbrella, and it portends much more than just really cool thermostats. Google will use Nest to pursue connected devices, and it could lead to huge growth of new connected devices--which we now call the Internet of Things (IoT). Google has already demonstrated an interest in smart... Read more...
We’ve said it before, but it bears repeating as we enter the era of the Internet of Things (IoT): Anything that’s Internet-connected can be hacked. We’ve seen it recently with TRENDnet IP cameras and warned about it with Nest (even as Google snapped it up in a $3.2 billion acquisition this week). And now, a security company says that a global attack campaign has been launched from household smart appliances. Proofpoint says that some 100,000 connected routers, multimedia centers, smart TVs, and “at least one refrigerator” sent out 750,000 malicious emails. The attacks... Read more...
The completely connected home has long been a dream of futurists, and little by little that’s becoming a reality. The Internet of Things is growing, and smart TVs are a big part of that trend as they continue to ship with more and more intelligence baked in. Samsung’s latest SDK for its Smart TVs includes more than just the ability to pull in and view content from a multitude of sources; it ostensibly allows you to control appliances in your home. Samsung says that the new Smart TV SDK 5.0 will enable you to control the refrigerator, air conditioning, lighting, and so on with the Samsung... Read more...
Pretty much everything that connects to the Internet is hackable--the exciting but vulnerable “Internet of Things”--but if we’re lucky, security researchers discover most of the vulnerabilities and exploits and help manufacturers patch them before cybercriminals make hay with them. Such is the case with Google Glass and Lookout Mobile Security. The Lookout Mobile Security folks identified a vulnerability in Google Glass wherein they could use a malicious QR code to hack the spectacles. Basically, as Google Glass “looked around” and took photographs, it scanned a QR... Read more...