Items tagged with Internet

AT&T has been awarded a patent for speeding up BitTorrent and other peer-to-peer traffic. We're not sure why the U.S. telecom is suddenly interested in file sharing, other than perhaps fielding complaints for throttling such traffic, but whatever the reason, the patent would create a so-called fast lane for file sharers, provided it's ever implemented. According to TorrentFreak, unauthorized file sharing is responsible for petabytes of traffic every month. That kind of traffic can lead to congested networks, hence why ISPs sometimes throttle BitTorrent. That's likely the... Read more...
Following an interview with Re/code late last week, president Obama has managed to upset officials in Europe for a couple of rather blunt comments regarding America's success with the Internet. For starters, Obama claims that the EU's actions towards regulating the Internet is 'commercially-driven', and is the result of their companies being unable to compete with 'ours'. In perhaps his most blunt comment, Obama stated, "We have owned the Internet. Our companies have created it, expanded it, perfected it in ways that they can't compete. And oftentimes what is portrayed as high-minded positions... Read more...
Google Fiber launched in Kansas City, Missouri in September 2012, and now AT&T is looking to creep in and compete toe-to-toe with its own ultra high-speed fiber network. AT&T’s U-Verse with GigaPower network is launching not only in Kansas City, but also “parts of Leawood, Lenexa, Olathe, Overland Park, Kan. and in surrounding communities located throughout the metro area.” "We're proud to launch in these cities as the first locations where we will offer ultra-high speeds to local consumers and employers in the Kansas City area," said AT&T Kansas president Mike Scott. "The AT&T... Read more...
The road to net neutrality and winning the Internet, as it were, won't be one that's quickly or easily traveled. On the bright side, Federal Communications Chairman (FCC) Tom Wheeler earlier this month announced quite plainly that the FCC will propose reclassifying the Internet as a utility under Title II of the 1934 Communications Act, putting it into the same category that power companies fall into. Doing so would give the FCC the power it needs to regulate Internet so that it stays free and open, but as you can imagine, telcos and ISPs aren't particularly... Read more...
One category that's been elusive to Apple is the TV business. Sure, the company has its foot in the door with its Apple TV set-top box, but what Apple really wants to do is offer a paid programming service through the web. It's long been a goal for Apple, and it appears that it may finally become a reality, provided it can seal the deal. According to Re/code and the industry executives it spoke with, Apple is currently in discussions with TV programmers to try and hammer out deals that would allow it to offer an "over-the-top" pay TV service, which is a fancy way of... Read more...
We reported earlier this week that the FCC was expected to issue a new net neutrality proposal this week, and as we can now see, it hasn't taken long to get a follow-up. In fact, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler has gone the extra mile by penning his own piece for Wired so that we could learn about this new proposal in layman's terms. As we hoped, the FCC will in fact be proposing that our Internet access will be classified as Title II, which would put it in the same category that power companies fall into. As far as many people are concerned, including myself, Title II is the only way we can guarantee... Read more...
China is again tightening its grip on Internet access and policies (big surprise, right?), this time by issuing a ban on online accounts that impersonate people or organizations. China will also begin strictly enforcing a requirement that web users go by their real names, not nicknames, when registering for online accounts.Enforcing the latter is a difficult task, as China has found out in the past. Its efforts have seen limited success up to this point, though it's not clear how China plans to enforce the rule going forward compared to its current efforts.It's a daunting task when factoring in... Read more...
Well, here's some long overdue progress. It's expected that on Thursday, FCC chairman Tom Wheeler will issue a proposal that works in net neutrality's favor, and fortunately, a vote will take place just a few weeks later. Wheeler's proposal would make our Internet access a Title II utility. That means that it'd be regulated in much the same way as public utilities, such as power, but it's expected that this proposal will stop short of having any oversight on pricing. Flickr: Stephen Melkisethian One of the greatest benefits of putting our Internet access under Title II is that fast lanes will... Read more...
For many Americans seeking high-speed Internet access for their homes, options are often very limited. In the Raleigh, NC area I have access to exactly two players when it comes to reliable high-speed internet for my home: Time Warner Cable and AT&T. Time Warner Cable’s highest speed tier in my area gives me 50 Mbps downstream and 5 Mbps upstream speeds. On the AT&T front, I can’t even get U-Verse at my address, so I would be limited to 6 Mbps downstream speeds via DSL (reliable information on upstream speeds is quite elusive, although they likely aren’t very good). With limited choice... Read more...
British Telecom (BT) has an ambitious plan to supercharge the U.K.'s broadband infrastructure. Gavin Patterson, CEO of BT, outlined plans to deploy its "G.fast" technology on a widespread scale, starting with two pilot locations this summer. According to Patterson, G.fast will enable speeds of up to 500Mbps to most of the U.K. within a decade, with deployment starting in 2016. The exact speeds a customer can hit will depend on how far away they are from the technology. Initially, BT is aiming to hit a few hundred megabits per second to hundreds of homes and businesses by 2020, with speeds increasing... Read more...
The broadband situation in America right now isn't ideal, and in fact, some might call it appalling. While it doesn't take much effort to find people with high-speed connections, there remain many out there who don't have one. And even worse, in some cases they might only have access to one ISP. Well, with even president Obama urging for net neutrality to pass, as well as to see our Internet become a title II class utility, the broadband situation has got to change. And now, with the FFC's reclassifying of what broadband actually is... I guess we're on our way. Previously, the FCC denoted... Read more...
Comcast is not exactly a well-liked company in the United States, and that’s putting it nicely. In fact, Consumerist readers ranked Comcast as the Worst Company In America for 2014 (making it two-time winner… err loser). As Comcast ratchets up its lobbying efforts to win approval for its acquisition of Time Warner Cable, the unnerving shadiness of the company continues to emanate from its pores.The latest chapter in the Comcast saga comes to us courtesy of consumer advocate Christopher Elliot. He details the story of Lisa Brown, who had a nasty run in with the company. After her family was experiencing... Read more...
After being hit with a $600,000 fine by the Federal Communications Commission over its Wi-Fi blocking efforts, the Marriott International thought better of its ill-advised policy and vowed to no longer block guests from using their personal Wi-Fi devices at any of its managed hotels. Score a point for consumers, and kudos to the FCC, which has now taken things a step further by outright prohibiting people and businesses from intentionally interfering with Wi-Fi hotspots.In an FCC Enforcement Advisory issued this week, the FCC noted a "disturbing trend" by hotels and other commercial establishments... Read more...
Little by little, Google is expanding its Google Fiber gigabit Internet service to more parts of the country, and the next lucky location is likely to be North Carolina. It's being reported that construction in North Carolina could start as early as April, presumably because it wouldn't be much fun to kick things off earlier and work in the winter months. That, and there's still plenty of planning and red tape to wade through.Google is holding a pair of events next week in Raleigh and Durham. It hasn't said what those events are about, though it's expected the search giant will make an announcement... Read more...
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