Items tagged with Internet

Privacy is hard to come by on the Internet, that's just the way it is. But hey, at least wireless carries and Internet service providers (ISPs) are not selling your browsing history without your permission right? Well, we're sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but the House of Representatives narrowly voted 215-205 to repeal broadband privacy rules that were recently introduced under the Obama administration. The bill eked a majority vote among party lines in the Senate (50-48) last week before it headed to the House of Representatives. In both cases, a simple majority vote was needed to pass the... Read more...
Earlier this month, we told you about a Senate bill that would undo what had been deemed overreaching “midnight regulations” by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) that were aimed at protecting consumer privacy. Today, the Senate voted along party lines (50-48) to kill the FCC measure that would require ISPs to gain consent before sharing customers' browsing data. The bill was authored by Senator Jeff Flake (R-AZ), Chairman of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Privacy, Technology and the Law. The vote to dismantle the FCC’s privacy rules was the result of the Congressional Review Act,... Read more...
According to Google, more than half of the world's population is still without Internet access. One of Google's ambitious goals is to change that statistic. That's no easy task for several reasons, one of which is that some locations are just too remote for ISPs to set foot in. Google has been experimenting with different ways of solving this problem, including the deployment of balloons that beam Internet connectivity in hard to reach places. This is an ongoing effort and one that is becoming more viable thanks to the adoption of machine learning. "You make unexpected discoveries that propel you... Read more...
Google has taken a small but potentially important step towards improving Internet speeds in Cuba. To that end, the Mountain View firm announced today that it has signed an agreement with Cuba's state-run telecommunications company to deploy servers in the region to boost speeds to Google's services, such as Gmail and YouTube. The deal will provide Google's Global Cache service to Cuba. By allowing the government-run telecommunications company ETECSA to use its technology and local servers, it can serve up access to Google's services at reduced latencies by caching some of its more popular high-bandwidth... Read more...
In less than a week Nintendo will release its first official Mario game for smartphones, Super Mario Run. It's a big moment for Nintendo, which is starting to embrace gaming on mobile handsets, and Super Mario Run could end up being huge. That is, if Nintendo doesn't get in its own way. The reason that is a concern is because Super Mario Run will require a persistent Internet connection. Series creator and Super Mario Run producer Shigeru Miyamoto explained the decision to require an always-on Interconnection to Mashable in an interview, along with a string of other topics. In short, the online... Read more...
To borrow and butcher a line from Social Network, a 1Gbps Internet connection isn't cool. You know what's cool? A 10Gbps Internet connection. Altice USA, the fourth-largest cable operator in the U.S., is investing in upgrading its entire network infrastructure to a ultra speedy fiber-to-the-home solution capable of delivering speeds of 10 gigabits per second by 2020. "Across the globe Altice has invested heavily in building state-of-the-art fiber-optic networks, and we are pleased to bring our expertise stateside to drive fiber deeper into our infrastructure for the benefit of our U.S. Optimum... Read more...
The world is a big place—around 7.4 billion people, according to recent estimates by the United Nation. The U.N. also estimates that nearly half of the world's population will use the Internet by the end of 2016. Not surprisingly, it's mobile connectivity that will lead the charge, as growth in mobile networks and lower costs combine to make the web a more accessible place.At the same time, the world's poorest sections will still go without Internet access, generally speaking. There exists a significant divide in Internet connectivity between developed countries and those that are developing—about... Read more...
When SpaceX wants to do something, you best believe it's going to be huge. Its latest task? Trying to convince the Federal Communications Commission to let it launch over 4,400 internet-beaming satellites into orbit. To put that into perspective, that's more satellites than the total number in use today. As it stands today, there are 1,419 satellites in orbit hard at work, and some other 2,600 that are inactive and just hogging a piece of space. Even combined, all those satellites still fall short of the number SpaceX wants to deploy, so to call this ambitious is a huge understatement. The goal... Read more...
While the U.S. is coming off a contentious presidential election, no matter how you feel about the outcome, be happy you live in a land where Internet censorship is a non-issue. In contrast, Spain and its ruling Popular Party led by prime minister Mariano Rajoy is making a push in congress to ban the use of memes, which often take the form of captioned images that are humorous and/or snarky. The proposal seeks to disallow "spreading images that infringe on the honor of a person" and makes reference to a law that's nearly a quarter of a century old. If PP politicians get their way, the ban will... Read more...
CenturyLink has entered into a definitive agreement to buy Internet backbone provider Level 3 Communications in a cash and stock transaction valued at around $34 billion. The deal, which was unanimously approved by the board of directors for both companies, bolsters CenturyLink's fiber optic footprint by 200,000 miles, including 64,000 miles in 350 metropolitan areas and 33,000  subsea miles connecting multiple continents. "The digital economy relies on broadband connectivity, and together with Level 3 we will have one of the most robust fiber network and high-speed data services companies... Read more...
Most broadband subscribers in the United States would be giddy as all get-out if 1Gbps service rolled into their area. And for most we imagine it eventually will, just as high-speed Internet eventually supplanted dial-up (though it may take longer than previously hoped now that Google has pressed the pause button on its fiber-optic expansion). But for James Busch, a radiologist living in Tennessee, 1Gbps service would be a major step backwards. To the best of our knowledge (and feel free to correct us in the comments section if we're wrong), Busch is the first and only person in the U.S. with a... Read more...
The hope that Google would eventually roll out its crazy fast fiber optic Internet service to virtually all corners of the continental United States was dashed on Monday when the company announced it was hitting the pause button on future expansion efforts. Google's sudden shift in strategy also means there will be some job losses in the coming days and weeks. What this all means to you depends on where you live. Google isn't completely abandoning its Fiber service. In the eight metro areas where Google Fiber already exists, the service will continue to be offered and supported. Google will also... Read more...
Julian Assange, the famous whistleblower responsible for leaking thousands of documents and hacked emails through WikiLeaks, may be wearing out his welcome in Ecuador. Government officials in Ecuador fessed up to disabling Internet access to the WikiLeaks founder at his embassy in London after the site published more hacked emails from Hillary Clinton's camp. A little background information is necessary to fully understand what's going on. Assange has been living at the Embassy of Ecuador in London for over four years. He had sought and received asylum by Ecuador in 2012 to avoid being extradited... Read more...
Mark Zuckerberg has made it clear on many occasions that one of Facebook's biggest goals is to bring Internet access to everyone, everywhere. As part of that effort, he and his company are in discussions both with officials in the United States government and wireless carriers on how to release an app that would bring free Internet to low-income and rural Americans. The app already exists in some foreign markets, though not without controversy. It's called Free Basics, and it was shot down in India after regulators took issue with the idea that Facebook could handpick the services users could see... Read more...
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