Items tagged with idt

Intel has selected Integrated Device Technology (IDT) to develop an integrated transmitter and receiver chipset for the company's Wireless Charging Technology (WCT) based on magnetic resonance technology, it was announced today.  In other words, WCT is one step closer to becoming a reality, which is exciting news whether you're hardcore geek or just a fan of gadgets. Yes, there are wireless charging platforms out there, but as Intel's Dan Snyder explains in his blog post, WCT isn't limited to inductive charging. You won't need to plop your smartphone or other gear on a special charging mat,... Read more...
Where would be without Multi-Touch? It's hard to imagine, given that the vast majority of today's smartphones utilize some form of multi-touch, and many new all-in-one PCs, monitors and tablets do as well. Multi-touch has effectively revolutionized how we interact with displays, and Integrated Device Technology (IDT) has just created a major step forward in the multi-touch world. They're introducing the industry's first single-layer multi-touch capacitive touch screen controller, which doesn't require cross-over isolation points that other solutions require. The catch is that even though it's a... Read more...
We often take the internet for granted, not necesarilly aware of the struggles that go on behind the scenes, such as that between U.S. based Cogent and Swedish TaliaSonera.  Presently these two large bandwidth providers are fighting over peering issues:“According to Cogent CEO David Schaeffer, TeliaSonera peered data selectively and refused to upgrade bandwidth at some of the companies’ peering connections, causing traffic to take long, winding routes around the internet and saturating peered connections’ pipes.“Schaeffer went on to imply that the loss of routing to their customers (and eventually... Read more...
Modern PCs are inching closer and closer to having 10 GB/sec or more usable memory bandwidth, and we haven't really had any complaints about the steady increase until we heard that Rambus was working on technology that could enable 1 TB/sec of memory bandwidth.The applications for graphics cards and consoles are certainly interesting, but we think that desktop and server CPUs might also end up benefiting from such an increase.  Consider that when Intel released the P4, its theoretical memory bandwidth was 6.4 GB/sec, and that was 4 years ago.  Today's CPUs have 4 cores, and it is... Read more...
Unlimited.  The Princeton on-line dictionary offers several possible usages of the word, however the one that would directly apply to the consumption of some resource would be the following:inexhaustible: that cannot be entirely consumed or used up; "an inexhaustible supply of coal" That definition makes perfect sense to most, but apparently not to some ISPs.Comcast, who was recently accused of putting the kibosh on P2P traffic, is now cutting off customers that it feels have used 'too much' of their unlimited bandwidth.According to Comcast the people are abusing the system, which actually makes... Read more...
PC Perspective has posted a very interesting new article which investigates some of the bandwidth limitations for SLI and Crossfire chipsets. With the launch of ATI's Crossfire Xpress 3200 we reviewed here, ATI has made several allegations indicating NVIDIA's SLI technology was at a distinct architectural disadvantage. Ryan puts the marketing aside and walks away with a clear understanding of how the two architectures truly match up.The truth of the matter is that both the NVIDIA NF4 SLI X16 chipset and the ATI XPress 3200 chipset provided enough bandwidth for today's SLI and CrossFire generations,... Read more...