Items tagged with Hacking

The Supreme Court approved a series of changes to Rule 41 of the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure by the United States Department of Justice that go into effect today. Those changes, which the DoJ proposed earlier this year and that were never discussed by Congress, gives the FBI permission to hack into multiple computer systems here and abroad with a just a single warrant in cases where they're part of a botnet or otherwise can't be traced to a precise location.Any U.S. judge can authorize such a warrant, including magistrate judges who typically only issue warrants within their own jurisdiction.... Read more...
It's been proven that some tech companies have been willing to cater to the government's every need, but others -- namely Google -- remain adamant about transparency regarding shady practices. Earlier this year, we reported on Google's new feature that informs users if they've become the target of state-sponsored attackers, so as to help you better protect yourself via whatever means you have available. We can't imagine what it's like to receive a notification like this, but it can't be a great feeling. Now, we're reminded that this functionality exists, as a slew of journalists and professors... Read more...
2016 is going to be remembered for a number of fortunate and unfortunate things, with one topic that falls into the latter category being the debacle of U.S. law enforcement vs. Apple. The FBI and other US federal agencies have made it no secret that they would like to be able to gain access to any smartphone if the need arises - something that anyone who cares even remotely about their privacy shouldn't be okay with. In the months that followed, the FBI somehow managed to break into an iPhone 5C without any help from Apple. And while it's not clear if the agency is able to pull that off on more... Read more...
Yahoo is again catching fire over a security breach dating back to 2014 that compromised the accounts of 500 million users, though this time the criticism is aimed at Yahoo's lack of timely disclosure. The company fessed up earlier this week that at least some of its employees had knowledge that a cyberattacker backed by a foreign government had hacked into its systems. The disclosure is contained in a filing Yahoo made this week with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). In it, Yahoo says it "had identified that a state-sponsored actor had access to the company’s network... Read more...
So here we go again, another "massive and sustained Internet attack" made possible by a large collection of hacked Internet of Things (IoT) devices, things such as CCTV video cameras, digital video records, all sorts of smart home gadgets with a connection to the Internet, KrebsOnSecurity has determined. This is not the first time it has happened and it won't be the last. The recent attack, an apparent retaliation by WikiLeak supporters after the Obama administration allegedly used its influence to push the Ecuadorian government to cut off Internet access to whistleblower Julian Assange, focused... Read more...
Police in the Czech Republic have arrested a Russian hacker for his suspected involvement in a massive 2012 cyber attack against LinkedIn. LinkedIn had been working with the FBI to track down the individuals responsible for the data breach, which exposed hashed passwords from over 100 million user accounts that were later offered for sale on the "dark web." LinkedIn initially acknowledged the security breach four years ago, though at the time it didn't say how many people were affected by it. Then this past May, a hacker was found attempting to sell LinkedIn account credentials belonging to 117... Read more...
First there was “Thanks, Obama!” Perhaps we should move on to “Thanks, Russia!”, because the country is getting blamed for the lion’s share of the recent major hacks against government entities. In fact, just this past week, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and Office of the Director of National Intelligence officially accused Russia of hacking the Democratic National Committee’s computer network in an effort to sway the November presidential election. Now, Russia has drawn the ire of the United Kingdom, and mobile devices are caught up in the crossfire. British prime minister Theresa May... Read more...
As if relations between US and Russia governments weren't sensitive enough, both the Department of Homeland Security and Office of the Director of National Intelligence have officially accused Russia of being responsible for breaking into official government servers and stealing more than 19,000 emails relating to the DNC this past summer. While some US government officials, including Hillary Clinton, have already made their own accusations towards the Kremlin, this is the first time the US government as a whole has directed blame specifically. It's unclear at this time whether or not this accusation... Read more...
It's come to light that a former contractor for the National Security Agency (NSA) was arrested back in August by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The agency suspects the contractor might have stolen and disclosed classified computer code developed by the NSA to hack into networks of governments around the world. And no, his name is not Edward Snowden, though he comes from the same consulting firm (Booz Allen Hamilton). The former contractor's name is Harold T. Martin III, a 51-year-old out of Glen Burnie, Maryland. He had already left the NSA and was working as a contractor for the Defense... Read more...
Security firm Cellebrite made headlines earlier this year when its services were employed by the FBI to help break into the phone of the San Bernardino shooter. Cellebrite recently invited a bunch of UK press to an event to show off what it's capable of.Equipped with an outdated smartphone, BBC reporter Rory Cellan-Jones went off for a half an hour, password-protected the device, and took pictures -- basically using the phone normally. You can see where this is going. Despite the password, Cellebrite plugged the phone into a bulky tablet, and after a few taps, the phone's security was disabled.... Read more...
Yahoo is the latest major US corporation dealing with the fallout of a data breach that happened two years ago. Some might say that Yahoo's heartburn is well-deserved, though, as the company could have handled things better back in the day, which would have led to a better outcome right now. As we covered on Thursday, Yahoo suffered a major breach back in 2014 that resulted in some 500 million user accounts having their information compromised. However, it's only just recently that users have learned of this, so that's the first major criticism of Yahoo but it goes deeper. Yahoo has said that... Read more...
Yahoo is getting ready to disclose a data breach that exposed account details for at least 200 million users. While nothing is yet official on Yahoo's part, the forthcoming disclosure is likely related to a security breach earlier this summer that Yahoo previously said it was investigating. Since then, a cybercriminal who goes by the name "Peace" has been selling the data on the dark web for $1,800.Peace, who has been linked to other high profile security breaches, claims the data includes usernames, passwords that are easy to decrypt, and personally information such as birth dates, email addresses,... Read more...
Two 18-year-olds from Israel find themselves in hot water with the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) for their alleged roles in running a lucrative attack service called vDOS. They're said to have earned over $600,000 in the past two years by helping customers coordinate over 150,000 Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks.Israeli authorities arrested the two teenagers, Itay Huri and Yarden Bidani, on Thursday as part of an investigation by the FBI. They were questioned and released the next day for what amounts to around $10,000 bond each. Authorities also seized their passports... Read more...
You might think that logging out of your PC before leaving it unattended for a short time is relatively safe, but you'd be wrong. A security engineer at R5 Industries demonstrated how incredibly easy it is to swipe the login credentials of a locked Mac or Windows PC using just a $50 USB device that's available to anyone and everyone online. His name is Rob Fuller and he has an extensive history in information security. He's helped design and build cyber defenses for the U.S. Marine Corps and Pentagon, has worked with Fortune 50 companies to tighten their online defenses, and even served as a technical... Read more...
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