Items tagged with glass

Add the Alamo Drafthouse chain of movie theaters to the list of locations where you're not allowed to wear Google Glass. According to reports, Alamo Drafthouse CEO Tim League made it the company's official policy to ban the wearable device once the lights go down and the previews begin to ensure that no illegal recording is taking place. The ban comes before Glass graduates from a prototype device to a consumer product, though that's really splitting hairs. Even though the Glass design isn't completely finalized, Google has been making the wearable device more widely available to consumers lately.... Read more...
One of the things Back to the Future II got right was that we'd eventually be wearing glasses with embedded electronics by 2015. Here we are a year ahead of schedule and though it's not JVC supplying the wearables, Google has stepped in with Glass. To Google's credit, Glass looks far less dorky than the JVC specs Marty McFly, Jr. wore at the dinner table, but there's still room for improvement in the fashion department, hence the new DVF | Made for Glass collection. The Google Glass team announced the chic eyewear on its Google+ page. Google has teamed with fashion designer Dianve von Furstenberg... Read more...
If you know anything about Google's history, you'll know that the company loves beta products. Gmail was in beta for years, and even after it left that phase of its life, Google allowed users to retain the "beta" graphic -- yes, that many people just couldn't let go of what was. Now, Google Glass is finally breaking into its most daunting beta phase yet, as Google has announced that anyone in the United States can purchase a Google Glass Explorer headset for $1500 (roughly 10x what it costs to physically build one, as it turns out). Previously, the headsets were limited to those who were invited... Read more...
Your chance to snag a pair of Google Glass came and went earlier this week when Google opened up its Explorer (beta tester) program to the general public for one day only. However, Google's been expanding the availability of Glass little by little -- the question is, are you willing to spend $1,500 on a pair? Apparently many people are, as Google sold out of Glass Explorer spots during its open availability. If you're intrigued by Glass but ultimately unsure if the available frames fit your style or desired comfort level, it looks as though Google will let you try out a non-functioning unit before... Read more...
It's been said that you can't truly boast about "selling out" if on one ever knew how many units you had to begin with, but make no mistake: there's demand for Google Glass. While Google has made recent efforts to quell the "Glasshole" mentality and make it more appealing to the mass market, pundits have suggested that it's mostly doing so to combat low re-use rates and dipping interest. Glass certainly isn't "novel" in the truest sense any longer, as the Explorer Edition has been kicking around for over a year. On April 15th, Google allowed anyone in the United States to exchange $1500 for an... Read more...
Hot on the heels of Google rolling-out a limited batch of Google Glass to the public, Samsung has applied for a patent involving a competing product that it's calling "Earphone". That name highlights the biggest difference between Glass and this, however; rather than act as pair of glasses, Earphone's HUD extends out from an earpiece. Given this, it would seem that the HUD would be a bit lower than it is on Glass, but if I'm looking at the diagrams correctly, it looks like everything would be adjustable. One thing to set Earphone apart is that it has a built-in earbud to transmit sound to the user.... Read more...
Entirely new product categories generally take time to take off. Even the smartphone took years before penetration rose above 50% in advanced markets such as the United States. But it certainly feels as if there's something different at play when it comes to wearables. While there's plenty of buzz about every new watch, fitness tracker, and head-worn device, the retention rate is low. Used (and cheap) Galaxy Gear smartwatches are strewn across secondhand sites such as eBay, and research from Endeavour Partners has found that "one-third of American consumers who have owned a wearable product stopped... Read more...
As soon as Google announced its Glass digital eyewear, the world went nuts with speculation; pros and cons simply flooded the Web. Since then, a lot of people have been left without a solid conclusion, no doubt thanks to the number of walls Glass has hit. We've learned of bars that have banned the device from being worn, and Google even once famously refused to allow people to wear it at a shareholder meeting. It's no surprise, then, that Google's been less-than-enthusiastic about all of this uncertainty its prospective users have, or the way they've been mislead. So, the company's taken to Google+... Read more...
With a just-launched Indiegogo campaign, the Google Glass competitor rollout continues. This time around, it's "Icis" in the hotseat, aiming to right Glass' wrongs - and, compared to other solutions I've seen in recent months, I am swaying towards the belief that this is one project worth watching. Icis is dubbed "Fashion Friendly Smart Glasses", with aesthetics being focused-on as much as the software and features. After all, no one wants to stand out of a crowd because of their odd-looking eyewear. Instead, they want to blend in, and perhaps even enhance their look. The current iteration of what... Read more...
It took all of a minute after Google announced Glass for privacy concerns to come to the forefront, and since then, the company has worked hard to calm everyone's fears. While Google itself might not bundle software that has the potential to invade someone else's privacy, there's little to stop a third-party developer from filling that void. Take NameTag, for example. This is a future mobile app that has the ability to scan someone's face, and then query a number of databases to find a match. Information about that person is then displayed. Clearly, though, someone is going to notice you getting... Read more...
Google had been stingy with who can join the legion of Google Glass Explorers, but the company has been gradually opening up the beta to more and more potential users. This autumn, current Explorers were allowed to invite three pals to try Glass, and in Google recently expanded the Glass Explorer program to anyone who signs up, offers a convincing argument for inclusion, and is lucky enough to be deemed worthy. The scope of potential Glassers is now expanding even further, as users of Google Music All Access are reportedly receiving email invitations to join the Explorer program. It’s not... Read more...
Google’s XE12 update to Google Glass is out, and there are some nifty new features to make Glass Explorers happy. One of the most notable is a new feature that lets users wink to snap a photo. It would appear that Google liked what it saw from Winky and either swiped the idea from developer Mike Giovanni or implemented his technology. “Wink”, as Google is calling it, is designed to make taking a picture supremely easy, with the idea being that you can turn on feature in Settings and snap pictures without taking yourself out of the moment. (It also makes it easier for Glass users... Read more...
As we inch closer to the launch of Google Glass for consumers, the legalities surrounding the device continue to come into question. In October, we relayed the story of a Californian driver who was pulled over for going over the speed limit, but before the officer wrapped things up, they added the charge of "driving with a monitor visible" because the driver was wearing Glass at the time. That particular incident was a known first, and since then, nothing more has solidified on the legal front (the driver's court appearance takes place at the end of the month). At the time this story broke, many... Read more...
At a 'hackathon' held in San Francisco today, Google unveiled its 'Glass Development Kit', or GDK for short. As the name suggests, this set of tools (which ties into Android's SDK) allows developers to take far greater advantage of what Glass is capable of. As we near the launch of Glass for consumers, the release of this development kit couldn't come at a better time. With it, developers gain access to previously-locked portions of Glass, such as advanced camera control, voice command access, gesture detection and more. At the hackathon, where Google invited about 100 developers, the GDK was explored... Read more...
Prev 1 2 3 4 5 Next