Items tagged with gingerbread

Google's developer dashboard for Android reveals that Jelly Bean is now the most popular version of the company's open source operating system, finally eclipsing Gingerbread to take the top spot. Jelly Bean is installed on more than a third of all Android devices (37.9 percent for versions 4.1.x and 4.2.x combined), and so is Gingerbread (Android 2.3.3 - 2.3.7) at 34.1 percent, though the two OSes are moving in opposite directions. The data is based on the number of devices that visited Google Play in the past 14 days so it's not 100 percent accurate, though it's the best representation of the... Read more...
It’s been about a year and a half since Google released Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich, yet a majority of Android devices still don’t run it. An even smaller percentage have the ‘tweener release, Android 4.1/4.2 Jelly Bean. There’s still a preponderance of Android devices stuck with Android 2.3 Gingerbread, which is all the more striking when you consider that Android 5.0 (likely codenamed Key Lime Pie) is coming soon. However, according to Android Developer data, all Android 4.0 versions (i.e., Ice Cream Sandwich and Jelly Bean) have finally overtaken Gingerbread on a majority... Read more...
It's been more than six months since Google first introduced Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, and it's taken that long to break the 10 percent barrier in Android market share. According to the Android Developers Dashboard, Jelly Bean is now installed on 10.2 percent of all Android devices that have accessed Google Play within the past two weeks. That's either promising or depressing, depending on your outlook. Essentially one out of every 10 Android devices is rocking Jelly Bean, and if you own one, then you have reason to grin. But if you're like the majority, your device has either been abandoned by the... Read more...
Another month is in the books (September), and that means it's time to examine the state of Android. What did we find? Well, according to data posted on the Android Developers blog, Gingerbread (Android 2.3 to 2.3.2) is still the most widely used version of Google's mobile operating system and is installed on more than half of all active Android devices (55.8 percent). The next closest build is Ice Cream Sandwich (Android 4.0.3 to 4.0.4), which has been unwrapped on less than half as many devices, accounting for 23.7 percent. Where things get interesting is if you throw Jelly Bean (Android 4.1)... Read more...
Whenever Apple releases a new iOS version, most who own an iPhone have the benefit of being able to upgrade. It's one of the biggest advantages of going Apple, while the opposite can sometimes be said about Android. Would you believe that despite having been released last October, Ice Cream Sandwich still isn't the dominant Android version? It gets even worse. The most popular Android version during all of 2012 is Gingerbread, also known as 2.3, released in December 2010. To say this is a bit disheartening as an Android fan isn't a stretch. While I sit here waiting impatiently for a Jelly Bean... Read more...
Cover your eyes, Android fans, here comes that dirty F-word no one in the Google camp likes to see, hear, or acknowledge: Fragmentation. It's an F-bomb that resonates with any Android user waiting on their carrier to deliver that delicious Ice Cream Sandwich (Android 4.0) update long after Gingerbread (Android 2.3) started to taste stale. The good news is, things are improving. And the bad news? There's still a long ways to go. Google's Android Developers portal was just updated with new statistics that show the current distribution of Android builds to date. By and large Gingerbread is the most-used... Read more...
Fujitsu is chasing after business users living in Japan with its new and weirdly named Stylistic M350/CA2 Android tablet. It's a 7-inch slate Fujitsu recommends for a variety of enterprise applications, such as a portable tablet for pitching business presentations to clients, a digital display terminal for retail stores, or for use in schools, each of which is accompanied by a goofy marketing picture. Marketing nonsense aside, this is a Gingerbread (Android 2.3) tablet with a WSVGA (1024x600) touchscreen display that weighs 420 grams. It has a mini-HDMI port, built in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, 512MB... Read more...
After years of work and a few false starts, Intel is finally ready to take the plunge into the smartphone market. At the CES keynote tonight, the CPU giant is officially launching Medfield, the 32nm smartphone SoC the company has built to take it into the next generation of smartphones (and a few tablets). The chip, now officially named the Atom Z2460, is ready for prime time. We visited Intel HQ in December and were briefed on the next-generation phone and what Intel expects it to do. After Moorestown's disappointing performance in the space, the CPU giant is keen to put its best foot forward,... Read more...
LG's giving its Optimus smartphone a second act. Simply enough, it's called the Optimus 2, the details of which are now available on LG's website, along with a photo gallery. What you'll find if you surf on over is a mostly entry-level smartphone device, at least by today's standards, with what could be an unmolested version of Google's Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) platform running the show. Tech specs include: 3.2-inch capacitive touchscreen (320x480) 800MHz processor 3.2MP rear-facing camera Virtual QWERTY keyboard Bluetooth 3.0 + EDR 2GB microSD card included (supports up to 32GB) GPS The Optimus... Read more...
Starting today, Verizon Wireless customers will be able to order the new LG Enlighten smartphone from the carrier's website. This phone runs on Android 2.3 Gingerbread and has an 800MHz processor. The Enlighten features a 3.2-inch touch screen display with a resolution of 320 x 480, 3G Mobile Hotspot capabilities, and a 3.2-megapixel autofocus camera and camcorder. The LG Enlighten will sell for $79.99 after discounts and with a contract. Although the phone is currently available for ordering online, it won't reach stores until September 29. Verizon Wireless And LG Mobile Illuminate With LG Enlighten™... Read more...
Over the last couple of weeks, since HP announced its will no longer manufacture devices using WebOS and the ensuing fire-sale of HP TouchPads, there has been much talk about porting Android over to the TouchPad to breathe some new life into an otherwise pretty nice piece of hardware. There are already a couple of projects underway and some sizable bounties available for the first developer (or team of devs) that port Android over to the TouchPad. The goal is to first port Gingerbread, i.e. Android 2.3, to the TouchPad and to then start working on Honeycomb (v3.0), which is the first... Read more...
One of the biggest gripes from customers who purchase phones directly from a U.S. carrier (as opposed to unlocked) is that carriers aren't always so quick to push out Android updates. Case in point -- the unlocked Nexus One received its Froyo updates long before any other phone, and the Nexus S has seen updates faster as well. AT&T is responding to customer demands, though: the carrier just announced that upgrades to Android 2.3 (Gingerbread) are planned for all post-paid Android smartphones already introduced this year. That means that the Motorola Atrix 4G will get the update starting today,... Read more...
T-Mobile may not be T-Mobile for much longer if the proposed AT&T merger goes through, but the carrier is still pumping out a nice array of handsets in the meantime. This week, the company added another HTC smartphone to their lineup, the Wildfire S. The phone actually debuted in Europe a few months ago, but now it's making its way to the U.S. It's an Android-powered phone (v3.2 of Gingerbread) with a 3.2" capacitive touch screen display, a 5MP camera / video recorder and a virtual QWERTY keyboard (with Swype). It's expected to become available on August 3 for $79.99 after a $50 mail-in-rebate... Read more...
Rumors that Amazon is planning a tablet of its own have sparked concerns over whether or not the company can properly differentiate between Kindle and a tablet without inadvertently cannibalizing or obviating the former--but what if readers didn't have to choose? Thanks the thinking behind the Nook2Tablet software, which allows readers to turn Barnes & Nobles' Nook into an Android device by inserting a microSD card. The microSD cards are priced at $34.99 (8GB), $49.99 (16 GB), and $89.99 (32GB). The company takes pains to reassure customers that their dollars aren't going towards a software... Read more...
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