Items tagged with Debian

The open source community has lost a giant contributor this past Monday. His name is Ian Murdock, founder of the Debian Project, which he created while attending Purdue University, where he earned his bachelor's degree in computer science in 1996. Sadly, Murdock is dead at 42, having seemingly taken his own life just days after a tussle with San Francisco police. Leading up to his death, Murdock posted several disturbing messages on Twitter accusing the police of mistreatment and abuse. One of his posts alluded to sexual assault from a female officer who "ripped off my underwear.. I guess that's... Read more...
We recently set out to design a mini desktop computer with the wildly popular Raspberry Pi single board computer. The Raspberry Pi is a Linux-driven, ARM processor-based micro computer that is known for its low cost and small size. People use the device for a variety of projects, from micro-servers to low cost media players. Basically, our goal was to turn what is currently one of the cheapest bare-bones computer boards  into a fully enclosed mini desktop computer that could be taken anywhere without the need for cabling or setup. One of the high level goals of this project was also to learn... Read more...
We recently set out to design mini desktop computer with the wildly popular Raspberry Pi single board computer. The Raspberry Pi is a Linux-driven, ARM processor-based micro computer that is known for its low cost and small size. People use the device for a variety of projects, from micro-servers to low cost media players. Basically our goal was to turn what is currently one of the cheapest bare-bones computer boards into a fully enclosed mini desktop computer that could be taken anywhere without the need for cabling or setup. One of the high level goals of this project was also to learn about... Read more...
One of the coolest aspects of Linux is its ability to support hardware long before other OSes - and even well before consumers can even get their hands on the hardware. Take USB 3.0, for example, which hit the kernel months before the first products hit the market, in September of 2009. And then there's the SSD command TRIM, which was first launched to the kernel in December of 2008 - six months before Windows 7 introduced the same thing as standard. Of course, supporting something and actually having people be able to use it are two entirely different things. In the case of TRIM, the file system... Read more...