Items tagged with data breach

The parade of banks, insurance companies and retailers that have suffered data breaches has caused many people to store their passwords with sites like LastPass. The security company creates a unique password for each of the user’s logins and provides access to those passwords via a single, master password.Now, LastPass is admitting that at least some of its data has been comprised. The company believes that its customers are not vulnerable, but it concedes that email addresses and authentication hashes are among the data affected. Password reminders and server per user salts were also comprised.... Read more...
After what's being described as a "massive data breach" at Global Payments, Visa has decided to part ways with the payment processor and try its luck elsewhere, Global Payments CEO Paul Garcia said, according to a report in the Associated Press. MasterCard, meanwhile, is either willing to give Global Payments the benefit of the doubt that this was a one-time snafu, or hasn't yet announced plans of its own to the ditch the payment processor. Garcia described the situation as being "absolutely contained" at this point, however as many as 1.5 million credit cards across the United States may have... Read more...
As you head into the weekend getting ready to party and celebrate the end of another long and grueling work week, take some time to keep tabs on your MasterCard and Visa accounts. If you don't, you could be in for a rude awakening when you go to pay for drinks and find out that your card has been declined. At issue here is a what's being described as a "massive" data breach at a U.S.-based credit card processor, according to KrebsOnSecurity.com.Visa and MasterCard have both been sending out non-public alerts giving banks a heads up that specific cards -- possibly more than 10 million -- may have... Read more...
Googling your own name might not be such a narcissistic activity after all; in fact, it just must save you from identity theft. At least that's what Kevin Andreyo, a Wilkes University professor, discovered when he used the "deep web" search engine, Pipl, to see what information about him might be publicly available on the Internet. What he found was a link to a document that not only included his Comcast user name and password, but the document also included what appeared to be the user names and passwords of over 8,000 other Comcast customers. Andreyo was inspired by the March 10, People Search... Read more...
On what many Americans consider a day of change, here we go again with more of the same: a massive data breach involving Heartland Payment Systems, a credit card payment processor, that was announced on Tuesday. First, the good news: no merchant data or cardholder Social Security numbers, unencrypted personal identification numbers (PIN), addresses or telephone numbers were involved in the breach. Neither was any check processing data. Now for the bad news: since they were alerted to suspicious activity by Visa and MasterCard, tens of millions of credit and debit card numbers or transactions may... Read more...
It all started with a snipped on page A23 of Thursday’s Washington Post, which notified the public that the McCain-Palin campaign was going to sell off its used office inventory at low prices. Then, it turned into a high-tech slip-up in which the campaign headquarters accidentally sold an information-ridden BlackBerry to a Fox reporter. Although the sale didn’t look like much when reporter Tisha Thompson arrived at the sale, she did find BlackBerry smartphones going for just $20 apiece. All of the batteries had died, and there weren’t any chargers for sale, but Thompson bought a couple anyway.When... Read more...
Earlier this week we reported on Scotland's Sunday Herald's claim that the Best Western hotel group was hit with the world's largest known data breach of eight million people's sensitive information, as well as Best Western's adamant denial. Even if the Sunday Herald story turns out to be true, the Best Western data breach would no longer hold the title of the world's largest known data breach. That record now goes to the Bank of New York (BNY) Mellon, which "lost" the sensitive information of 12.5 million customers. The BNY Mellon data breach itself is not new news. As documented in the Identity... Read more...
No matter how carefully you try to protect your personal and financial information, you are still at the mercy of those companies you choose to give your information too. Unfortunately, it looks like keeping your sensitive data secure is becoming increasingly difficult for some companies. According to the Identity Theft Resource Center (ITRC), 2008 is shaping up to be the year of the greatest number of reported identity-theft security breaches to date: "As of 9:30 a.m. August 22nd, the number of confirmed data breaches in 2008 stood at 449. The actual number of breaches is most likely higher, due... Read more...
Certainly, there's no lack of accidental data breaches. Companies, even countries like the U.K. have accidentally exposed sensitive information about customers or citizens. But to do it deliberately? Whoa.There has been outrage in Italy after the outgoing government published every Italian's declared earnings and tax contributions on the internet.The tax authority's website was inundated by people curious to know how much their neighbours, celebrities or sports stars were making.The Italian treasury suspended the website after a formal complaint from the country's privacy watchdog.The information... Read more...
Monday the Massachusetts Bankers Association (MBA) issued a press release announcing a major data breach at what Visa and MasterCard said was an unnamed "major retailer."  The details were far worse than the original news, though.A security breach at an East Coast supermarket chain exposed more than 4 million card numbers and led to 1,800 cases of fraud, the Hannaford Bros. grocery chain announced Monday.Hannaford said credit and debit card numbers were stolen during the card authorization process and about 4.2 million unique card numbers were exposed, placing the case among the largest data... Read more...
It wasn’t that long ago that the loss of a laptop or hard disk containing sensitive information about consumers was big news.  Sadly, it’s becoming much more common these days.  In fact, it’s so common that U.K. Information Commissioner Richard Thomas and his staff have looked into some 6000 complaints. "The roll call of banks, retailers, government departments, public bodies and other organizations which have admitted serious security lapses is frankly horrifying," Richard Thomas wrote in a report. "How can laptops holding details of customer accounts be used away from the office without strong... Read more...