Items tagged with Cuda

At the GPU Technology Conference today, the CEO of NVIDIA, Jen-Hsun Huang, unveiled a new CUDA initiative, dubbed CUDA-x86. As the name implies, the new framework will allow developers to write CUDA code natively for x86. Don't confuse this announcement with the PhysX issues we discussed last month—when we spoke to NVIDIA back then we were told that certain legacy performance issues would be addressed in the next major version of the PhysX SDK. Porting CUDA to x86 is a smart move for NVIDIA given Intel's own intentions towards the high performance computing (HPC) market. One of the core advantages... Read more...
CUDA. Performance increases. GPUs. NVIDIA. Tesla Compute Cluster. Somehow or another, all of those are interconnected in NVIDIA's latest announcement, in which they have revealed Parallel Nsight support for Visual Studio 2010 along with up to 300% performance boosts in CUDA toolkit libraries. The announcement really boils down to two new versions of industry-leading development tools: Parallel Nsight and the CUDA Toolkit.  If you aren't aware, Parallel Nsight is described as the "only integrated development environment for creating GPU-accelerated applications for a range of desktop and supercomputing... Read more...
NVIDIA has just taken the wraps off an entire line-up of Fermi-based GeForce GT and GTX 400M mobile GPUs—seven in total---and revealed a number of notebook design wins from major OEMs using the GPUs. Like their desktop-targeted counterparts, the mobile GeForce GT and GTX 400M series GPUs leverage technology from NVIDIA’s Fermi architecture, which debuted in the GF100 GPU at the heart of the company’s flagship GeForce GTX 480. GeForce GT and GTX 400M series GPUs are DirectX 11 compatible and support all of NVIDIA’s “Graphics Plus” features, including PhysX, 3D... Read more...
Not long ago, we reviewed the entire FirePro workstation graphics card lineup from ATI. With the V8800, our testing revealed considerable performance gains over the previous generation V8750, coupled with a lower price point. Surely, that's a combination that consumers can appreciate, especially for those looking to upgrade sooner, rather than later. But, at the time, the market was not yet settled as we anxiously awaited a response to ATI's FirePro products from NVIDIA. Thankfully, the wait is over as the launch of a new series of professional graphics cards from NVIDIA based on the company's... Read more...
Not long ago, we reviewed the entire FirePro workstation graphics card lineup from ATI. With the V8800, our testing revealed considerable performance gains over the previous generation V8750, coupled with a lower price point. Surely, that's a combination that consumers can appreciate, especially for those looking to upgrade sooner, rather than later. But, at the time, the market was not yet settled as we anxiously awaited a response to ATI's FirePro products from NVIDIA. Thankfully, the wait is over as the launch of a new series of professional graphics cards from NVIDIA based on the company's... Read more...
Over the past four years, NVIDIA has made a great many claims regarding how porting various types of applications to run on GPUs instead of CPUs can tremendously improve performance by anywhere from 10x-500x. Intel, unsurprisingly, sees the situation differently, but has remained relatively quiet on the issue, possibly because Larrabee was going to be positioned as a discrete GPU. The recent announcement that Larrabee has been repurposed as an HPC/scientific computing solution may therefore be partially responsible for Intel ramping up an offensive against NVIDIA's claims regarding GPU computing.... Read more...
Earlier this week, we covered news that a California PS3 owner, Anthony Ventura, had filed a class action lawsuit against Sony, alleging that the company's decision to terminate the PS3's Linux support via firmware update constituted a false/deceptive marketing practice. While most PS3 owners never took advantage of the system's Linux capabilities, "Other OS" functionality is critical to the universities and institutions that have deployed PS3 clusters as high-performance compute farms. We talked with several project leads on the impact of Sony's decision, and what it means for low-cost supercomputing... Read more...
Earlier this week, we covered news that a California PS3 owner, Anthony Ventura, had filed a class action lawsuit against Sony, alleging that the company's decision to terminate the PS3's Linux support via firmware update constituted a false/deceptive marketing practice.While most PS3 owners never took advantage of the system's Linux capabilities, "Other OS" functionality is critical to the universities and institutions that have deployed PS3 clusters as high-performance compute farms. We talked with several project leads on the impact of Sony's decision, and what it means for low-cost supercomputing... Read more...
Bill Dally, chief scientist at NVIDIA, has written an article at Forbes alleging that traditional CPU scaling and Moore's Law are dead, and that parallel computing is the only way to maintain historic performance scaling. With six-core processors now available for $300, Dally's remarks are certainly timely, but his conclusions are a bit premature. Will The Real Moore's Law Please Stand Up And/Or Die Already? Moore's original representation of his now-famous law.Dally's claims Moore's Law is dead because "CPU performance no longer doubles every 18 months." This is little more than a straw man;... Read more...
When Intel announced its plans to develop a discrete graphics card capable of scaling from the consumer market to high-end GPGPU calculations,  it was met with a mixture of scorn, disbelief, interest, and curiosity. Unlike the GPUs at SIGGRAPH in 2008 (or any of the current ones, for that matter), Larrabee was a series of in-order x86 cores connected by a high-bandwidth bus. In theory, Larrabee would be more flexible than any GPU from ATI or NVIDIA; Intel predicted its new GPU would begin an industry transition from rasterization to real-time raytracing (RTRT). Larrabee's original GPU core.... Read more...
ZOTAC is expanding its Silent ZONE Edition Lineup with the new ZOTAC GeForce GT 220 ZONE Edition. This silent graphic card is powered by a NVIDIA GT 220 graphics processor with 48 CUDA cores and 1GB of high-speed DDR2 memory. The ZOTAC GeForce GT 220 ZONE Edition supports Microsoft DirectX 10.1, DirectCompute, OpenGL 3.2, and NVIDIA CUDA powered games and applications. “ZOTAC is one of the leading manufacturers of silent graphics cards. Our lineup of ZOTAC GeForce ZONE Edition graphics cards has won many awards for the combination of performance and silent operation,” said Carsten Berger, marketing... Read more...
Last week, we covered NVIDIA's decision to disable PhysX support if the NV drivers detect the presence of an ATI product. Jump ahead seven days, and the utterly predictable has happened—end-users have found a way around NVIDIA's lockout and have re-enabled the one-two punch of ATI graphics and NVIDIA PhysX. Quick, kids: Can any of you guess what happens next? Over at NGOHQ, forum member Regeneration is claiming that the NVIDIA drivers published after the 185.85 WHQL series (this includes 186.18 through 191.07) also disable Ageia's original PPU add-on board if a non-NVIDIA GPU is installed. We've... Read more...
Every so often, someone on the 'Net stumbles across something noteworthy, but the news doesn't spread until weeks or maybe even months later. That's what's happened over at NGOHQ, where forum reader DarthCyclonis discovered that NVIDIA drivers released after the v185.85 WHQL package (i.e, 186.18 and higher) removed the ability to use a GeForce 8xxx, 9xxx, or 2xx card as a dedicated PhysX processor if an non-NVIDIA GPU is present. When asked for the reason behind the change, an NVIDIA representative stated: "For a variety of reasons - some development expense some quality assurance and some... Read more...
In a market where dual-GPU, single-PCB graphics cards are readily available from most major OEMs, product manufacturers are increasingly turning to water cooling as a way to differentiate their products and out-maneuver their competitors. The superior thermal characteristics of liquid cooling allows companies like BFG to hit higher core / memory clocks than they might using air alone.  However, H2O-reliant high-end video cards cater to an even smaller slice of the market—specifically, those enthusiasts with big money to spend and who are comfortable using water in their own PC. BFG's GTX 295... Read more...
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