Items tagged with Chrome

We suspect quite a few folks will be rejoicing over this one. This week, Google announced that its 64-bit experimentation with Chrome in Windows was a success. Thus, it's planning official, bona fide 64-bit support for Chrome Stable once Chrome 37 hits. As you'd expect, benefits in the departments of "speed, stability, and security" are on the top of the changelog. In graphically-heavy benchmarks, the 64-bit version of Chrome has been found to "improve speed," with the VP9 codec that's used in HD YouTube videos boasting a 15 percent improvement in decoding. Stability measurements from people opted... Read more...
They might not be the most powerful PCs out there, but Google's Chromebook and Chromebox series has one thing locked-down: Value. That's something proven in spades with Acer's new Chromebox CXI, a compact desktop PC that starts at a mere $180. You might think that a sub-$200 PC would have to look like a sub-$200 PC, but I'd argue that the CXI doesn't: Most Chromebooks and Chromeboxes up to this point have featured ARM processors, but the CXI is an exception: Under the hood is Intel's Celeron 2957U, a dual-core processor clocked at 1.4GHz. Yes - that's modest, but it's x86, and remember, we're still... Read more...
It's been a mini-roller coaster ride for Google's Chrome browser, which flirted with surpassing the 20 percent market share threshold around this time two years ago. Fast forward to today and Chrome has finally managed to leap over the hurdle, landing at 20.37 percent to close out the month of July, according to the latest data from Net Applications. That's enough to maintain a second place finish ahead of Mozilla's Firefox browser, which has been on a slow and steady decline for more than a year. The last time Firefox enjoyed a 20 percent share of the market was in May of 2013 -- it now sits at... Read more...
Does your laptop battery seem to give up the ghost a little bit quicker when you use Google's Chrome browser to surf the web? You're not alone -- this is a known issue that's been around since at least 2010, though it's largely been swept under the rug. Until now, that is. Google has vowed to fix the issue, and to fix it soon. Even though this has been a problem for the past several years, it went largely unnoticed by the general public until more recently when Forbes contributing writer Ian Morris shed some light on the topic. According to Morris, the culprit is that Chrome doesn't fully let go... Read more...
Our innocence lost, we now know that the National Security Agency (NSA) effectively strong arms technology companies far and wide into dishing out our personal information. It's a bum rap, and it may make you think twice about firing off that email to a friend or family member criticizing one of the government's policies, lest you both end up on some secret list. And then there are black hat hackers to worry about, especially if you're in possession of valuable data. As an added measure against third-party shenanigans, Google is adding a new tool to Chrome that should offer some additional peace... Read more...
Get ready to see a lot of people talking to their computers. Google has officially rolled out a new feature in Chrome that lets you conduct a voice search on a desktop or notebook using just your voice. From a Google page, you can simply say, “OK Google” and say whatever you want to hunt for. This was a feature that Google had in beta back in late February, but now it’s here. It’s not clear if some of the other functions that Google teased in a blog post are available yet. These include telling Google to, for example, set a timer for 30 minutes or create a Google Now reminder... Read more...
The address bar in a Web browser has been a standard feature for as long as Web browsers have been around - and that's not going to be changing. What could be, though, is exactly what sort of information is displayed in them. In December, Google began rolling-out a limited test of a feature in Chrome called "Origin Chip", a UI element situated to the left of the address bar. What this "chip" does is show the name of the website you're currently on, while also showing the base URL; eg: hothardware.com. To the right, the actual address bar shows nothing, except a prompt to "Search Google or type... Read more...
If you haven't already, you should consider dropping Internet Explorer and using a browser like Chrome or Firefox, at least until Microsoft rolls out a fix for a zero day vulnerability that reportedly affects nearly every version of IE. Worse yet, if you're still stubbornly rocking Windows XP for whatever reason, this is potentially a permanent vulnerability -- Microsoft dropped support for the legacy operating system earlier this month. The United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) is one of several governments that suggests employing an alternate browser. "US-CERT is aware of... Read more...
In a continued effort to make its Office productivity suite more easily accessible to a wider audience, Microsoft has made the web versions of its Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and OneNote apps available to download through Google's Chrome Web Store. This boils down to an added convenience for Chrome users. As Microsoft points out in a blog post announcing the migration to the Chrome Web Store, "Office Online works great in all browsers" already. However, those who primarily use Chrome can now add World Online, PowerPoint Online, and OneNote Online to their Chrome App launcher to create new Office documents... Read more...
As the Heartbleed bug inflicts damage in absentia (or not, there’s no way to tell), Google Security wrote a blog post letting users know that although the company has actively patched to numerous Google services, some important Google products are immune to the bug including Chrome, Chrome OS, and all versions of Android--except for Android 4.1.1. “All versions of Android are immune to CVE-2014-0160 [Note: That’s the Heartbleed bug] (with the limited exception of Android 4.1.1; patching information for Android 4.1.1 is being distributed to Android partners),” wrote Google... Read more...
The discovery of a security vulnerability in OpenSSH, which is a set of programs that provide encrypted communication sessions using the SSH protocol for an estimated two-thirds of the web, challenged the notion that anyone can ever be truly safe on the Internet, regardless of how careful you surf. How so? Researchers discovered a major vulnerability in OpenSSH that could allow hackers to dig up your personal information, including usernames, passwords, credit card data, and much more. It's called Heartbleed, and it has the Internet community on high alert. There's a patch available, which many... Read more...
This shouldn't come as a complete shock to anyone who's been around the online block a time or two, but no web browser is 100 percent secure. That much was once again proven at the annual Pwn2Own hacking event held at the CanSecWest security conference. By the second day of the event, every major browser had fallen -- Firefox (Mozilla), Chrome (Google), Internet Explorer (Microsoft), and Safari (Apple). Not all browsers are created equal, however, and out of the bunch, Firefox had the unwanted distinction of being the most exploited. Security researchers participating in the event were able to... Read more...
In the next few days, you’ll be able to control Google searches on the Chrome browser using only your voice, as the latest Chrome beta brings this capability to Windows, Mac, and Linux platforms. In a new tab, you can simply say, “Ok Google” and then speak your search. Beyond that, you can also tell Google to perform actions, which is arguably an even more compelling feature. For example, a Google Chrome blog post suggests you could say “Ok Google, set a timer for 30 minutes” or create a Google Now reminder with “Ok Google, remind me to pick up dessert at 6pm... Read more...
In a world where browsing is increasingly moving to mobile, the desktop browser is in a strange state. It's still far too popular globally to ignore, but how is a company to make browsing on the desktop anything more than a mere utility? Leave it to Google. Google has just announced a tie-in with LEGO that'll allow you to build and imagine right in Chrome using WebGL technology. The story goes as such: a Google team in Australia developed this in 2012, and just now it's being opened up to the world. The social aspects are (naturally) powered by Google+, but you can ignore all of that if you're... Read more...
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