Items tagged with Browser

The last thing you want to do is broadcast your bank or other sensitive login credentials for any Nosy Nellie to see. That's why a properly secured website asking for your confidential information uses encryption. Starting soon, Google's Chrome browser will tattle on websites that fail to secure your passwords and credit card details. There will be a warning when a website using insecure HTTP connections asks for your sensitive data. As it stands, the current version of Chrome (Chrome 53) doesn't explicitly label HTTP connections as non-secure. But beginning in January of next year, Chrome 56 will... Read more...
According to tracking website NetMarketShare, Google's Chrome overtook Internet Explorer this past March to become the most widely-used Web browser on the planet. As of just last month, the service pegged Chrome as owning a staggering 54% of the total marketshare, with IE settling with 27%. Firefox, meanwhile, scored about 8%, while Edge took 5%. With Chrome dominating the market, it must mean that it's the best browser out there, right? While Chrome is definitely doing something right to get to the top, as we've found out in recent months, those reasons have nothing to do with battery life. As... Read more...
Data breaches happen all too frequently to companies both big and small. The latest victim is Opera Software, the Scandinavian outfit behind the Opera browser that's especially popular on mobile devices. Opera's security team said it detected signs of a attack on its sync system, and though the hack was quickly blocked, it believes the culprit(s) still made off with some stolen data. Users who take advantage of Opera's sync feature had their account details compromised in the attack, including their passwords and login names. Though Opera only stores encrypted (for synchronized passwords) or hashed... Read more...
Flash's days on the web are numbered. That's been evident for the past couple of years as the anti-Flash movement has gained steam. Little by little, software developers and online services have been removing Flash support from their products, and starting in August, you can count Firefox among them. Well, partially anyway. Firefox isn't getting rid of Flash altogether, but the browser will begin blocking certain Flash content that Mozilla feels is not essential to the user experience. The decision to crack down on Flash plugins is one of several things Mozilla has planned to ultimately bring Firefox... Read more...
There's a new version of Google's Chrome browser available for Android devices, one that includes "two barges full of performance and stability fixes." The new build, Chrome 51, also brings tabs back into the Chrome application rather than continuing to utilize the merged babs feature that was introduced with Android 5.0 Lollipop in 2014. The "Merged tabs and apps" feature made Chrome put open tabs in the app switcher instead of having them all in one place. It was a change that users generally disliked, and though Google included the option of disabling the feature, it was turned on by default.... Read more...
You can browse cute cat pictures for longer than ever before, now that Opera has released a new battery saver that claims to increase battery life by about 50% compared to other browsers like Google Chrome. So far the feedback from Twitter has been positive with comments from users like @jonathanhaslett exclaiming “Somehow @opera became the best desktop web browser without anyone noticing.” Opera started testing this update in May via its developer channel. Opera Software stated, “It took us quite some time to normalize our test environments, but still the challenge was to be able to... Read more...
One of the key metrics when evaluation a laptop is battery life. For some people, it's the most important measurement, or at least right up there with overall performance. But what if you could dramatically improve performance just by using a specific web browser? Opera Software is testing a new power saving mode in a developmental build of Opera that it says can extend battery life by up to 50 percent. "We are the first major browser to include a dedicated power saving mode, designed to extend your laptop battery life by up to 50 percent compared with, for example, Google Chrome. Depending on... Read more...
If you're a Firefox user and haven't upgraded to the newest version yet, go grab it. Once you do, you can start to receive push notifications from your favorite websites, a functionality Mozilla added to Firefox 44 for Windows, Mac, and Linux, and one that already existed in both Apple's Safari and Google's Chrome browsers. Those of you who aren't interested in push notifications, don't fret, you're not going to be bombarded with messages. Push notifications is a permission-based feature, so you'll only receive them from websites if you give them the green light. "This is similar to Web notifications,... Read more...
Psst, Internet Explorer users -- brace yourselves, EOL (End of Life) is coming. It's a new year and apparently Microsoft resolved to reduce the number of browsers it supports to just two, those being Edge in Windows 10 and Internet Explorer 11 in previous versions of Windows. All other IE builds are soon to be obsolete from a security standpoint. The date of execution is January 12 (next Tuesday). At that time, Microsoft will cease supporting Internet Explorer versions 8, 9, and 10. What that boils down to is no more technical support and, more importantly, no more security updates. Anyone who... Read more...
Mozilla rolled out version 43 of its Firefox Web browser yesterday, and all things considered, it seemed to be a standard fare release. However, there's more than meets the eye, because if you decided to check out the full downloads page, you might have noticed a completely new entry for "Windows 64-bit". That's right: Firefox finally has a "stable" 64-bit release for Microsoft's OS. A 64-bit version of most any software offers a couple of key benefits, including potential performance boosts as well as the ability to utilize more than 4GB of memory (as if Firefox needed more, right?) The vast majority... Read more...
Have you ever seen a browser littered with toolbars and other junk that doesn't belong? A common trick used by malware and adware writers is to inject DLLs (Dynamic Link Libraries) into the browser, which bypass the built-in interfaces for settings controls. Microsoft is determined not to let that happen in its Microsoft Edge browser for Windows 10. Back in May of this year, Microsoft announced that Edge wouldn't support certain legacy technologies found in Internet Explorer, including ActiveX, VBScript, Browser Helper Objects (BHOs), and other things that could be exploited. That decision not... Read more...
The Internet is an ever changing congruous mass of standards, design, and interoperability challenges. Keeping on top of it all can be a daunting task. It's a delicate balance between features, security and performance. If you're considering swapping out your web browser for something new and fresh, but are uncertain over the real world performance differences, this article should help with lots of insight. Features are not something that can be easily compared, and will be up to you to decide what you want in a browser. As for security, that is in a constant state of flux, and issuing metrics... Read more...
Microsoft released its latest OS, Windows 10, about five weeks ago, and while there were some definite launch niggles, it seems as a whole, it's been well-received. Well, if we can ignore the fact that it captures quite a bit of information on you by default, that is. One of the most ambitious parts of Windows 10 is Microsoft's Internet Explorer replacement, called Edge. It was touted as being the best browser Microsoft's ever created - fast, secure, and feature-rich. Admittedly, it does bring a couple of cool features to the table, such as being able to take notes inside of a webpage. But, we... Read more...
Mozilla on Friday announced some major changes coming to the development of add-ons for its Firefox browser. One of the biggest changes is a new extension API called WebExtensions, which isn't all that different from the one used in Chrome and Opera. By switching to WebExtensions, Mozilla is making it easier for developers to make extensions that work in multiple browsers. "Extension code written for Chrome, Opera, or, possibly in the future, Microsoft Edge will run in Firefox with few changes as a WebExtension. This modern and JavaScript-centric API has a number of advantages, including supporting... Read more...
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