Items tagged with Broadband

The European Commission is doing its best Oprah Winfrey impression, though instead of giving away cars, it's focusing on Wi-Fi access to the public sector—you get free Wi-Fi, and you get free Wi-Fi, and you get free Wi-Fi! It's a €120 million (~$135 million in U.S. currency) effort to bring free Wi-Fi to all facets of public life by the year 2020. Governments can apply for funding to participate in the WiFi4EU project to install Wi-Fi networks in public places, such as libraries and parks. When all is said and done, the EU estimates that anywhere from 6,000 on up to 8,000 public locations will... Read more...
Congratulations people of Chicago, Comcast just expanded the availability of its 1-gigabit broadband Internet service to your area. That sounds like reason for celebration, right? It should be except that compared to same service in Atlanta and Nashville, it costs twice as much for the speedy Internet connection. In Atlanta and Georgia, Comcast offered new customers willing to commit to three years of service a rate of $70 per month. Those who wanted no part of a long-term contract could pay $140 per month, which is what Comcast is charging for its 1Gbps service in Chicago. Unfortunately, Comcast... Read more...
The Federal Communications Commission led by chairman Tom Wheeler suffered a setback today in its plan to encourage and allow cities to build and expand their own broadband networks, as a federal appeals court ruled the agency didn't have the authority to block two states from setting limits on municipal broadband expansion. Municipalities in Chattanooga, Tennessee and Wilson, North Carolina wanted to expand their broadband networks to neighboring communities and counties, which would increase competition with private Internet Service Providers (ISPs) that have regional monopolies. However, there... Read more...
In the broadband-testing world, Ookla's Speedtest dominates with copious amounts of useful data being compiled every day. According to its latest US broadband report, the company says that there are a staggering 8 million tests conducted worldwide each and every day. Those numbers mean one thing: we can get a very accurate picture on what broadband speeds are like across the globe. Speedtest has produced such reports in the past, and ultimately it has never painted the prettiest pictures for US broadband performance. Even with this latest report, the country's broadband landscape has been... Read more...
Usually when there's an announcement about data caps, it's bad news for subscribers. Refreshingly, that isn't the case with AT&T, which is raising the ceiling on the amount of data its U-verse customers are able to use. It's a welcome acknowledgement that the Internet is growing and that, collectively, users are spending more time streaming, downloading, and even uploading content.AT&T says as much in its blog post announcing the change, and for that it deserves some amount of kudos. How much kudos? That depends on how happy you are with raising the monthly allowance of data to 1 terabyte... Read more...
Yesterday the FCC voted to adopt new rules that would facilitate the development of 5G wireless networks. Today the Obama Administration announced that it will launch launch a $400 million Advanced Wireless Research Initiative led by the National Science Foundation (NSF).The administration claimed that these next steps are simply building on the “President’s legacy of forward-leaning broadband policy”. When President Obama signed the Recovery Act into law, he funded nearly $5 billion in broadband investments. This included more than 114,000 miles of broadband infrastructure. He supported “Dig... Read more...
It might be just a tad early for Charter Communications to pop the champagne, but it can certainly have an intern fetch the bubbly in preparation of a celebration. The U.S. Department of Justice laid out settlement terms of an antitrust suit that would allow Charter to forge ahead with its proposed acquisitions of Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks. The Department of Justice attached several conditions to its settlement, the biggest being that Charter would not be allowed to enter into or enforce agreements that would make it more difficult for online video services like Netflix and Hulu... Read more...
In what's being described as a "game changer for the city of Boston," Verizon has agreed to lay some 800 miles of fiber optic cables for its high-speed FiOS service in Beantown. Once complete, the great people of Boston can expect faster downloads and lower prices due to the increased competition in the area. Verizon's decision to lay the groundwork for its FiOS service in Boston comes as quite a surprise after the company previously said it wouldn't happen. However, New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft helped change Big Red's mind by having sit-downs over lunch with Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh... Read more...
Early last month, the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler revealed a proposal that would give low-income Americans a monthly subsidy to help cover the cost of home broadband Internet access. Wheeler explained that the subsidy would be made possible thanks to updates to the Lifeline program, which has drawn its fair share of controversy over the years. The FCC today announced the measure was approved in a 3-2 vote, predictably split along ideological lines with the three Democratic appointees voting for, and the three Republican appointees voting against. The main reason... Read more...
The Federal Communication Commission (FCC) is looking to give poor Americans greater access to the Internet via an update to the controversial Lifeline program. The proposal, which would give low-income Americans a $9.25 monthly subsidy for home broadband access, is meant to bridge the technological gap between the haves and the have-nots. According to FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler, only 48 percent of households with a total income of less than $25,000 per year can afford to have high-speed Internet at home. However, it should come as no shock that the number climbs to 95 percent for American households... Read more...
Cox Communications is standing up for its subscribers by so far refusing to spy on their online activities and take legal action against those who download copyrighted material. That stand has already cost the ISP $25 million, the amount a Virginia federal jury recently came up with when it ruled that Cox was responsible for the activities of those using its service, and it could cost Cox even more. The ruling against Cox took place last December. Since then, music publisher BMG has followed up by asking a court to issue a permanent injunction against Cox. BMG also wants the ISP to boot customers... Read more...
Let the confetti fly, Comcast has served up a 1Gbps Internet connection to a single home in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania! Okay, maybe that isn't cause for balloons and streamers, though it's a notable achievement because the connection is the first to use a DOCSIS 3.1 modem on a customer-facing network. The significant of using a DOCSIS 3.1 modem in a customer's home is that it paves the way for 1Gbps Internet on Comcast's existing network infrastructure. It's not like competing 1Gbps (and higher) broadband roll outs that require extensive network upgrades -- all Comcast needed in this case was a... Read more...
It probably won't come as much surprise that Comcast and its customers aren't on the same page when it comes to data caps. Simply put, Comcast is in favor of charging extra when a customer goes over a set amount of data per month, while customers despise them and have filed over 13,000 related complaints with the Federal Communications Commission. Here's the thing, Comcast CEO Brian Roberts doesn't like the term "data cap" because hey, if you're a Comcast customer and you reach your monthly data allotment, the ISP will happily charge you a fee for more data. In other words, there's no off switch... Read more...
New York is a crowded place, but that's no excuse for ISPs to deliver under performing broadband service. To prevent that from happening, the state's Attorney General, Eric Schneiderman, is asking the public to visit a special website designed to test their Internet speed as part of an ongoing investigation. The Attorney General's probe currently targets three ISPs, including Verizon, Cable Vision, and Time Warner Cable. Schneiderman sent all three a letter asking for various details, such as any speed tests the companies have run on their own and any disclosures they've sent to customers about... Read more...
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