Items tagged with benchmarks

AMD's Radeon Technologies Group (RTG) has been teasing the product we will be presenting performance metrics for in the pages ahead, for almost year now. A dual-Fiji powered Radeon card was brought out on display by AMD's CEO Lisa Hsu last June, though at the time, no name had been designated for the card. Then last month, in a joint announcement with Crytek and the company's VR First initiative, AMD unveiled the 16 TFLOP Radeon Pro Duo at its Capsaicin event at GDC 2016 for the first time. There was significant build-up for this card, and rightfully so, with the potential for it to be the fastest... Read more...
Rise of the Tomb Raider has hit the PC lining it up in our gun sights for graphics, gameplay and performance analysis. The game launched on the Xbox family of consoles a few months back and has since been ported to PC thanks to NIXXES Software. It’s a competent console to PC port updated with many graphics settings and effects to tweak and dial to your particular tastes and system capabilities. Some of the rendering and effects features include, Ambient Occlusion, Depth of Field, Dynamic Foliage, Bloom shader effects, Tessellation and several more. But before we get ahead of ourselves, let's give... Read more...
AMD is making a stink about SYSmark, a popular benchmarking program that's been around for many years, and one the chip designer says is not reliable. Rather than provide meaningful results and information, AMD claims SYSmark unfairly favors Intel products and puts too much emphasis on strict CPU performance above all else. John Hampton, director of AMD's client computing products, explained in a four-and-a-half-minute video posted to YouTube why SYSmark itself is an unreliable metric of performance. He even brought up the "recent debacle" involving Volkswagen as proof that "information provided... Read more...
Fallout 4 is finally here. Channeling its best 50's era paranoia and the allure of a warm, radiation-free bomb shelter, Bethesda’s newest RPG tells us doomsday prepping and cryogenics actually work—yay! Well, that is until they malfunction and you’re thrust topside to an irradiated, post-apocalyptic wasteland filled with vile mutated everything, all gunning and clawing for you.The world of Fallout 4 is a hostile place, much like Fallout New Vegas and Fallout 3 before it, though we’re glad to be back on the game world's radioactive soil, becuase it has been nearly a decade since the latter launched.... Read more...
Tomorrow's VR (virtual reality) applications are going to usher in a new era of graphics based on the Khronos Group's Vulkan API. To make sure the industry is properly equipped to benchmark such things, Basemark today announced its new GPU Vulkan benchmarking software, which it's developing in close cooperation with some big name companies like Intel, AMD, NVIDIA, Imagination Technologies, Qualcomm, and Renesas. You can think of the Vulkan API as the spiritual successor to OpenGL. What's different about Vulkan is that it's a low-level API that gives developers direct control of GPU resources. In... Read more...
Intel's 6th Generation Skylake family of Core processors has been available for some time now. We previously gave you a look at the desktop variant that Intel initially rolled out. However, the mobile variant of Skylake is perhaps Intel's most potent incarnation of the new architecture that's power-optimized on 14nm technology and with a beefier graphics engine, for more capable thin and light notebooks. In late Q3, Intel started rolling out Skylake-U versions of the chip in a 15 Watt TDP flavor. This is the power envelope that most "ultrabooks" are built with and it's likely to be Intel's highest... Read more...
The wait is over. The time is nigh for sci-fi super-spy gadgets, cigar-smoking, and rampant exclamation points. Oh yes, the one-eyed one has returned. Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain has landed on the PC and it’s a doozy. Utilizing the same Fox Engine for its visuals, this latest effort nicely follows-up last year’s Metal Gear Solid V Ground Zeroes—the prequel which set the stage for this, the epic and more open-ended Phantom Pain. Despite being one of the industry’s most beloved visually-challenged protagonists--with numerous sequels, prequels and remakes under his belt, Snake is a veritable... Read more...
Sometimes I wonder if we should cook up a TMZ-style column explicitly for reporting on all the drama that transpires between AMD and NVIDIA. Today we’ve witnessed one of the first shots fired from one of those camps, on what’s poised to be a very heated battleground over the next several years: DirectX 12. Over the weekend press was handed access to one of the world’s first DirectX 12 benchmarks courtesy of Oxide’s Ashes of the Singularity. This isn’t a synthetic test like 3DMark’s API overhead feature test, but rather a true real-world benchmark using a pre-Beta version of the upcoming game. And... Read more...
We use a bevy of benchmarks here at HotHardware to measure everything from computational power to SSD speeds to the graphical prowess of $1000 video cards. I employ 3DMark's Fire Strike software on a near-daily basis for my GPU testing and find that, while it can't perfectly mirror in-game performance, it's a pretty accurate representation of a graphics card's -- and by extension your PC's -- gaming chops. But as we collectively rush toward the proliferation of Virtual Reality hardware and games in 2016 and beyond, we lack a standard for testing how well our systems can handle VR. Enter Crytek... Read more...
Intel's strategically timed CES 2015 launch of their new 5th Generation Core Series processors for notebooks was met with a reasonably warm reception, though it's always difficult to rise above the noise, with the sea of announcements from competitors and the like. CES is always such a zoo and that's by design. Performance claims for Intel's new chip promise major gains in graphics and more modest increases in standard compute applications. However, the biggest bet Intel placed on the new Broadwell-U architecture is performance-per-watt throughput and battery life in premium... Read more...
Samsung is at the ready with a brand new family of mainstream solid state drives, targeting the market segment previously occupied by its popular SSD 840 EVO series. The new Samsung SSD 850 EVO series is the follow-up to the company’s current flagship SSD 850 PRO, but the new EVO is Samsung’s first to pack 32‐layer 3D V‐NAND 3-bit MLC flash memory. The move to 32‐layer 3D V‐NAND 3-bit MLC flash (a.k.a. TLC) brings costs down, but doesn’t adversely affect endurance because the cell structure doesn’t suffer from the same inherent limitations of planar NAND, since the cells are stacked vertically... Read more...
To say that BioWare has something to prove with Dragon Age: Inquisition is something of an understatement. The first Dragon Age: Origins was a colossal, sprawling, unabashed throwback to classic RPGs. Origins introduced gamers to the world of Thedas. As a newly-minted Grey Warden, players were tasked with stopping a deadly invasion of darkspawn -- creatures that had laid waste to vast swathes of the continent in ages past and ground entire nations into dust. The game took place over a relatively short span of time, but featured a wide array of memorable locations, landmarks, and NPCs. One of Dragon... Read more...
When we took at look at SanDisk's Extreme II series of solid state drives in June of last year, we began our article by noting, "odds are, if you’ve bought anything that uses flash memory in the last 20 years or so, you already own a small piece of SanDisk technology. The company has been a leader in flash memory storage since the late ‘80s and manufactures products used in everything from smartphones and portable media players to digital cameras and camcorders. With such a long history in the flash memory business, it’s should be no surprise that SanDisk offers an array of solid... Read more...
Without admitting any wrongdoing, Intel has agreed to settle a class action lawsuit alleging that the Santa Clara chip maker manipulated benchmark scores for its first-generation Pentium 4 processors. The suit also alleges that Hewlett-Packard helped Intel fudge its scores in order to cover up "pervasive design flaws" resulting in "dismal" performance compared to the previous generation Pentium III and AMD's Athlon CPUs. "Intel used its enormous resources and influence in the computing industry to, in Intel’s own words, 'falsely improve' the Pentium 4’s performance scores. It secretly... Read more...
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