Items tagged with Asus

If you’ve read our review of the ASUS ZenFone 2, you’d know that we’re pretty enamored with the device. At just $199 unlocked (16GB version), the Intel Atom-powered smartphone brings a lot to the table including a 1080p display, respectable performance and rock solid build quality. If you can get past the crummy cameras, it’s hard-to-beat mid-range Android smartphone. For those that like the ZenPhone 2, but wish it had a bit more style and a bit more storage, ASUS is delivering with the ZenFone 2 Deluxe Special Edition — that’s a pretty big name for a small smartphone, so let’s get right to what... Read more...
Thanks to the emergence of NVIDIA’s G-SYNC, AMD’s FreeSync, i.e Adaptive Sync, 4K resolutions and various other display technologies, we’ve had the pleasure of evaluating a number of new monitors recently. One of our favorites from this past year was the ASUS ROG SWIFT PG278Q. Although it featured a resolution of “only” 2560x1440, and employed a TN panel, the monitor’s design language, support for G-SYNC, and ultra-fast (at the time) 144Hz peak refresh rate made it a real pleasure to use, especially for gaming.If you had asked us what we’d change on the ASUS ROG SWIFT PG278Q at the time, we would... Read more...
While the market is abuzz with dreams of virtual reality, lest we forget about AR, or augmented reality. Unlike VR, which completely immerses you into an outside world, AR takes advantage of the environment around you to add otherwise impossible interactions to your living room, bedroom or man cave. Like VR, AR isn't new. In fact, even advertising has gotten in on the action in the past, and Google Glass had some capabilities to do interesting things as well. It must be said, though, that most companies are preferring to go all-in on VR rather than AR. This past August, Google got rid of its AR,... Read more...
When we took a look at the ASUS ROG SWIFT PG278Q G-SYNC monitor last year, we praised it for its sleek design, thin bezels, support of NVIDIA’s adaptive refresh rate technology, and high-quality TN panel—relatively speaking. TN (Twisted Nematic) panels generally have fast response times and can be more affordable, but at the expense of color accuracy and viewing angles. The TN panel used in the ROG SWIFT was surprisingly good, but it still couldn’t compete with higher-end IPS panels in terms of overall quality. And because the display was designed for G-SYNC, it was outfitted with only a single... Read more...
Wireless routers are going through somewhat of a renaissance right now, thanks to the arrival of the 802.11ac standard that is "three times as fast as wireless-N" and the proliferation of Internet-connected devices in our homes and pockets. Whereas before we merely had a handful of laptops and PCs connected to the internet at various times, we now have homes with many devices connected all the time, including our phones, tablets, computers, smart televisions, game consoles, and smart home devices. Though wireless N wasn't bad at the time, it's simply not ideal when dozens of devices are connected... Read more...
There's innovation in the monitor market again. For several years, a top of the line monitor consisted of a 30-inch panel with a 2560x1600 resolution. That's not too shabby, but more recently, monitor makers have begun offering even better displays higher resolutions and fancy new features. Count ASUS among them. ASUS today announced two new 27-inch monitors, the PG279Q and PG27AQ. At 27 inches, both are physically smaller than the 30-inch monitors that claimed flagship status for so long, but a closer look at each one reveals a few standout features that might make you want to upgrade, depending... Read more...
There are laptops, and then there are laptops like the ASUS ROG GX700. No ordinary notebook, the ROG GX700 is every bit a desktop replacement that's focused on performance first and portability a distant second. It's also the world's first liquid cooled laptop, a feature that comes courtesy of a liquid cooling dock. Why would you even want liquid cooling in a laptop? Most people wouldn't, not like this anyway. But the ROG GX700 isn't for most people, it's for enthusiasts who want true desktop-class performance in a notebook form factor. Yes, the ROG GX700 is bulky, and while it's miles away from... Read more...
Although the $999 GeForce GTX Titan X is currently the King of the single-GPU hill, NVIDIA’s GeForce GTX 980 Ti is the far more palatable option for most hardcore enthusiasts, due to its lower $649 starting price point. As we showed you in our initial coverage of the GeForce GTX 980 Ti, however, the card is still a monster in terms of performance. It typically outpaces AMD’s flagship Radeon R9 Fury X (at least with DX11 titles) and it finishes only a few percentage points behind the much pricier Titan X.NVIDIA’s partners have also taken the GeForce GTX 980 Ti and morphed it into something even... Read more...
Tech buddies Microsoft and ASUS have been getting along famously so far, so the two have decided to take their friendship to the next level by expanding upon an earlier patent license agreement. The expanded agreement broadens the cross-licensing pact and, among other things, will see ASUS pre-install Microsoft's software and services on its Android-based smartphones and tablets, Microsoft announced. Microsoft's Office productivity services will be among the software included, which we presume to mean apps like Word, PowerPoint, Excel, and perhaps Skype and OneDrive as well (neither company has... Read more...
ASUS’ popular Transformer Book family is receiving two new members today, and both are aimed more towards the entry-level market. The first new entry is the Transformer Book T100HA, which is a tablet at heart (one that weighs in at 1.28 pounds), but comes standard with a detachable keyboard (which adds another 1.04 pounds). The T100HA is powered by Intel’s Cherry Trail-based Atom X5 Z8500, which ASUS says offers a 20 percent performance boost over its predecessor. Despite the increase in performance, ASUS is still promising 12 hours of runtime from its built-in battery and Fast-Charge technology... Read more...
In this latest episode of HotHardware’s Two and a Half Geeks, Marco, Paul and Dave discuss AMD's small but powerful Radeon R9 Nano, the Alienware X51 R3 SFF console-killing PC, the Intel-powered ASUS ZenPad S 8 tablet, hint at an upcoming giveaway. and lots more... Show Notes: 01:45 - AMD Radeon R9 Nano Review13:14 - Alienware X51 R3 Review22:00 - ASUS ZenPad S 8.0 Review28:35 - High Schooler Arrested For Homemade Clock That Looks Like a Bomb39:46 - Logitech MX Master Mouse46:19 - Upcoming Giveaway Hints... Read more...
Competing with Apple in the mobile space isn't rocket science, it's just a matter of sticking to a proven formula for success -- build a premium device with superior specs than the one Apple is selling, inject it with Android, and then undercut the iWhatever in price. That's not to say Apple is the only premium slate target of opportunity but we'd surmise Apple would consider it the sincerest for of flattery anyway. Incidentally, we've just described the ASUS ZenPad S 8.0. It's a well designed Android tablet with Intel inside, and it boasts better specs than the iPad mini 3. It's also less expensive... Read more...
Update, 9/15/15 - We have updated our coverage of the new ASUS ZenPad S 8.0 and have our full review posted here with a full suite of benchmarks and other experiential analysis. Please head here for our detailed coverage or you can check out our quick-take below. ASUS is on a roll these days, especially in mobile technologies. In the past few months, the company has surprised us all with the affordable and powerful ZenPhone 2 smartphone (which starts at a very frugal $200 off-contract) and the even cheaper ZenFone 2E which takes the prepaid route via AT&T. ASUS is again using its... Read more...
Laptops are mostly static devices. What we mean by that is, for the vast majority of laptops, what you get at the time of purchase is what you get, and that's that. Unlike a desktop system, in which each individual component is upgradeable without too much fuss, only certain parts of a laptop are user replaceable, at least without some serious deconstruction and maybe even a bit of modding . Typically, laptop makers provide easy access to the RAM and storage, though everything else is either soldered in place or otherwise proprietary for various reasons (whitebooks not withstanding, of course).... Read more...
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