Items tagged with Amazon.com

The new App Store rules that Apple announced on Tuesday were planted in a news release about subscriptions.  However, after a number of inquiries from different places, it's clear it's much more far-reaching than that, and at least one content publisher is intimating that leaving the App Store is a distinct possibility. As some feared, the changes are more widespread.  For one, it looks like Amazon.com's Kindle app will be affected by the changes that were announced by Apple on Tuesday. Although the changes seemed to be about subscriptions, it seems that Apple wants its cut of any... Read more...
Obesity is a problem in the United States, and it's not a secret. Gastric bypass surgery is a radical, often last-ditch effort to "cure" the problem, and apparently some have decided that it's not something that requires a doctor: there appears to be a DIY kit available on Amazon.com. Just to be clear, there are two sellers available, but the kit isn't sold by Amazon.com (or fulfilled, either), so Amazon Prime is not an option. Including shipping, the kit will run you about $280, but the item really includes 3 kits, in case you get it wrong the first time. There is no anesthesia included, so you'll... Read more...
Amazon.com has quietly begun a project to duplicate Wikipedia content and use links in the content to point to books that can be purchased on Amazon.com. The so-called Shopping-enabled Wikipedia Page was reportedly created in November. Amazon spokeswoman Anya Waring told CNET the following: "Shopping-enabled Wikipedia pages are a new introduction on Amazon.com. As of November, we have rolled [the feature] out in the books category; however, [it] will be expanding to new categories in 2011." That means, of course, that in 2011, other product categories will be linked to the pages, such as electronics,... Read more...
If you need any further validation that e-books have finally made it big, here it is. The New York Times plans to launch a bestseller list for e-books in early 2011. The New York Times bestseller lists are the gold standard for defining a book's success. The print version of the bestseller lists are divided into several categories. For e-books, things will start "small." The New York Times will have only two lists covering fiction and non-fiction when it launches. Rankings will be independently verified by third party company RoyaltyShare. You can read the full press release below. The New York... Read more...
As Apple prepares to launch an Apple TV - Netflix hookup, beginning next week when the new Apple TV ships, Amazon.com is seen to be working on a new subscription service that would stream TV shows and movies, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal. While Amazon.com already has a Video-on-Demand service (first launched in 2006 as Amazon Unbox, as shown below), that service sells individual episodes and movies, some as low as $1.99 apiece. Its new service would be based on a subscription model, similar to Netflix's service, which bundles streaming with DVD rentals. Also similar to Netflix,... Read more...
The price of electronic books is going up. Just days before Apple releases its iPad, Amazon.com gave two major publishers permission to raise the price of their eBooks for Kindle readers. The agreements with Simon & Schuster and Harper-Collins give the publishers the ability to break from Amazon's policy of holding new titles to a price of $9.99. Under the terms of the agreement, eBooks from Simon & Schuster and Harper-Collins can now be sold for $12.99 or $14.99. The agreement is similar to the deal Apple has made with publishers. Although Amazon.com sought to keep the price of eBooks... Read more...
Barnes & Noble plans to offer a version of its eReader software designed for the iPad. The eReader will enable users to access more than one million eBooks, magazines, and newspapers in the Barnes & Noble eBookstore as well as content in a user's own Barnes & Noble digital library. Even though the iPad will compete against Barnes & Noble's own device, the Nook, the bookseller is sticking with its commitment to provide the eReader software for as many screens as possible. Barnes & Noble's free eReader software is currently available for most computing and mobile devices such... Read more...
In the wake of Apple's announcement of the iPad, comes the first salvo in what is probably going to be a drawn out battle. Amazon.com has pulled books published by Macmillan, electronic or not, from its site.Search for authors available from Macmillan, and with the exception, it seems, of library-bound or "bargain books," you won't find Amazon.com pricing for them. You'll find them at "other sellers," but not Amazon.com.  You can see it in the above image for Robert Jordan's "Knife of Dreams." Why would Amazon.com do this? It would seem this is hardly in the best interest of customers,... Read more...
Those who may be in the midst of their Amazon.com stock after the introduction of the iPad, may want to pause and think for a second. While many forecast the Kindle's demise, more important than a Kindle sale for Amazon.com are sales of its e-books.After all, as with printers, it's all about the consumables. You may only sell one Kindle, but you could sell tens of e-books to one consumer. In response to the iPad's introduction, Amazon.com said the following:Customers can read and sync their Kindle books on the iPhone, iPod Touch, PCs, and soon BlackBerry, Mac, and iPad. Kindle is purpose-built... Read more...
Anything that can be hacked will be hacked, and virtually everything can be hacked. Thus, we see that latest escapade in the land of hacking. The Kindle's DRM (digital rights management, copy protection) has been compromised.Amazon sells content for the Kindle in a proprietary format, .azw.  It contains DRM to prevent users from transferring copyrighted content to other devices.  Think of it as the e-book version of what Apple's FairPlay DRM used to represent.The hack lets users convert the Kindle's e-books into PDF files, allowing them to be read on any number of non-Amazon e-book readers... Read more...
This will probably raise red flags across the publishing industry, but it is certainly a coup for Amazon.com and its Kindle e-book reader. Steven Covey is Amazon.com's 13th-highest top-selling author overall, and Amazon.com now has "electronic exclusivity" to two of his best-sellers.The e-book versions of Stephen Covey's bestselling books, "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" and "Principle-Centered Leadership," are now available exclusively (for a year) in the Amazon Kindle Store. They are both available for $7.99.In doing so, Covey has moved the rights of the electronic versions of those... Read more...
Intel on Tuesday introduced a new e-book reader, one designed for the visually impaired, which can read digital files of books aloud, as well as capture images from printed material via a 5-megapixel digital camera and similarly read the text aloud at a variety of listening speeds. Additionally, the Intel Reader, as its called, has a 4" display that will show the text in large fonts, for those impaired, and not blind. The $1,499 device may seem expensive when compared to the Kindle 2, which can also read aloud, though in a robotic voice, but this new device is designed specifically as a reader... Read more...
Barnes & Noble's nook hasn't even seen the light of day yet (it's pre-order only), and it's already embroiled in a lawsuit. In this case, Spring Design, which has its own e-book reader, is claiming B&N has used IP garnered from meetings with Spring Design in its nook.The lawsuit addresses Spring Design's "Alex" e-book reader, which features two e-ink displays with capacitive touchscreens as well as the Google Android operating systems. This is all very similar to the nook.Spring Design claims in their press release that they and Barnes and Noble had been meeting since the beginning of this... Read more...
Amazon.com has announced its own house brand of electronics. The new brand, called "AmazonBasics," is, according to the giant Internet retailer, a new private-label collection of consumer electronic "basics" created for customers who want "exceptional value." In other words, basic low-priced electronics goods, which for now appears to be limited to blank media such as blank DVDs or CDs, and cables. The selection for now is extremely limited, but one nice perk for green buyers is that all AmazonBasics products will come in Amazon's Frustration-Free packaging. Although, as I said, the selection is... Read more...
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