Items tagged with Linux

In terms of gaming, Linux is on a roll lately. The latest company to throw its weight behind the open source platform is GOG.com, which says it's been working on bringing Linux games to its service for the past few months. There's still work to be done, buy by this fall, GOG.com plans to launch at least 100 classic titles on Linux. "We're initially going to be launching our Linux support on GOG.com with the full GOG.com treatment for Ubuntu and Mint. That means that right now, we're hammering away at testing games on a variety of configurations, training up our teams on Linux-speak, and generally... Read more...
Linux users have long championed their platform of choice as a viable option for gaming, and with solutions like WINE having been around for quite some time, playing games on a Linux box is certainly nothing new. However, there's been a recent push to promote the open source platform as a gaming powerhouse, especially by Valve with its Steam OS and Steam Machines initiative. On top of that, now we've learned that Crytek will offer native Linux support for its CryEngine game engine. "During presentations and hands-on demos at Crytek's GDC booth, attendees can see for the first time ever full native... Read more...
At long last, Valve's SteamOS is now available to download, albeit in beta form. This is a major step in what Valve hopes will be an evolutionary step in PC gaming, as it tries to displace (or at least co-exist) with traditional consoles in the living room. The other major goal with SteamOS is to break the dependency on Windows, which Valve fears will one day take a wall-garden approach to apps like Steam. "SteamOS beta is an early, first-look public release of our Linux-based operating system. The base system draws from Debian 7, code named Debian Wheezy," Valve explains. "Our work builds on top... Read more...
A couple of weeks ago, we talked about Dell's latest Ubuntu notebook, the XPS 13 "Developer Edition", also dubbed "Sputnik 3". This is the kind of notebook that most Linux fans would love to have; it packs in a fast Intel Core i7 dual-core, a 256GB SSD, 8GB of RAM, and a crisp 1080p 13.3-inch display. As fantastic as the XPS 13 is, though, its $1,549 price tag puts it out of range for a lot of people. The upside to that is that Dell offers a decent range of other Ubuntu notebooks, but as mentioned in the earlier post, things could be improved. With Dell tackling the high-end, what about the low-end?... Read more...
When Dell first began offering Ubuntu-flavored notebooks, it was unclear whether or not it was a venture that the PC builder would stick with. Admittedly, it seemed at first that Dell was just testing the waters, to see if the supposed demand was real. To date, the company hasn't littered its lineup with such offerings, and it's especially weak in the mainstream consumer side, but things have certainly gotten better since the initial release. Where you'll have your best luck of scoring a nice Ubuntu-powered Dell notebook is on the business side, with the Latitude series. Or, if your goal is great... Read more...
A long and winding road for the Moblin-now-Meego-now-Tizen mobile OS may be reaching a major destination: A release into the market on Samsung smartphones. Backed by both Intel and Samsung, the Tizen OS looks like it will arriving to market on a pair of Samsung smartphones soon. Two phones that are believed to be bearers of Linux-based Tizen, the Samsung GT-I8800 and the Samsung GT-I8805, registered Rightware Browsermark scores on Rightware’s Power Board. Neither are top of the class, although the GT-I8800 currently sits in the 9th spot in the rankings, while the GT-I8805 is at number 21.... Read more...
When Windows Vista first came out, it was plagued by problems, including performance issues and compatibility woes (most of which were resolved with the first Service Pack). At the time, there were some who predicted that Linux would supplant Windows as the mainstream OS. That didn't happen, of course, partly because SP1 solved most of Vista's issues, and also because user friendly versions of Linux weren't quite ready to hold Aunt Mabel by the hand. Plus, it wasn't the platform of choice for gamers. Are we on the verge of a revolution now? Probably not, but Linux has definitely improved in every... Read more...
Some of the reactions to Apple's decision to make OS X 10.9 Mavericks a free upgrade have been a little over the top, especially in relation to Windows, which we think will be just fine in this so-called "new era," as the Cupertino company calls it. However, if we're talking about free software, Linux certainly needs to be in the discussion. During a question and answer session at LinuxCon Europe in Edinburg on Wednesday, Linus Torvalds pointed out that Linux has been free for over two decades," NetworkWorld reports. However, Apple's move into pro bono territory isn't the same as the philosophy... Read more...
Looking for a change of scenery on your desktop? Want to see what all the fuss is over Linux? New and seasoned vets alike are invited to download and install Ubuntu 13.10 for desktop (and smartphone), Canonical's latest version of its open source operating system. According to Canonical, Ubuntu 13.10, or Saucy Salamander, is Ubuntu's first true mobile release with a streamlined core OS and mobile user interface designed for device convergence. In other words, it's the Windows 8/8.1 of Linux. "This is a milestone in computing history," said Rick Spencer, who leads Ubuntu’s consumer-facing... Read more...
It used to be laughable to think of Linux as a preferred gaming platform. Sure, emulators like Wine made a gamer's life a little easier on Linus, but things like driver issues and lack of native titles have always prevented Linux from stepping into the gaming limelight, at least until now. We're not sure if a tectonic shift is occurring right before our very eyes, but there's no denying there's a major push towards getting gamers to embrace the open source operating system over Windows. We're seeing it primarily from Valve with its upcoming SteamOS and Steam Machine boxes, though also from developers.... Read more...
Valve is doing that thing it does where it trickles out a series of big announcements over the course of a week, and these announcements promise to be very big indeed. The first of a trio from Valve is that the company is producing SteamOS, a free, Linux-based, standalone operating system that will run on “living room machines”. The OS is built around Steam itself, so it’s geared toward gaming, and in particular, gaming on the big screen in your living room. Valve calls it a “many-to-many entertainment platform” where content makers can directly connect with customers... Read more...
Out of seemingly nowhere, Linux is becoming a hot topic. Major technology players ranging from Google to IBM are coming forward in support of the open-source OS, and at LinuxCon 2013, IBM announced plans to invest one billion dollars in new Linux and open source technologies for IBM's Power Systems servers. As IBM puts it: "the investment aims to help clients capitalize on big data and cloud computing with modern systems built to handle the new wave of applications coming to the data center in the post-PC era." Two immediate initiatives announced, a new client center in Europe and a Linux on Power... Read more...
The question no longer seems to be whether or not Valve will release a Linux-based console of its own -- the so-called Steam Box -- but when will it debut? Based on some comments Valve co-founder Gabe Newell made during a keynote at LinuxCon 2013, the company could launch a Steam Box as early as next week, or at least offer up some additional information about its hardware plans. Newell promised to share "the hardware opportunities we see for bringing Linux into the living room" very soon, perhaps next week. While that could simply mean more lip service about PC prototypes by third party manufacturers... Read more...
Anything that helps those of all ages learn a new skill without spending a lot of cash is great; anything that helps people learn a skill such as coding is extraordinary. Such is Coder, a project developed by a small group of Googlers that offers a simple way to turn a Raspberry Pi into a little web server and also build apps on it, within a browser. Coder relies on standard languages such as HTML, CSS, and Javascript and lets users “build real web stuff”. It’s an open source project, so it’s totally free, and all you need to get going is a Raspberry Pi, power... Read more...
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