Items tagged with EU

HP and Oracle have been slugging it out in court over the future of Intel's Itanium for months now. HP has just widened the front by asking the EU to investigate whether Oracle acted improperly when it terminated support for Intel's Itanium. HP claims that Oracle is improperly leveraging its software market to compel purchases of its own hardware, while Oracle maintains that Itanium is essentially a zombie chip. Just the Facts HP sued Oracle after the software company announced it would stop building software for Itanium. According to Bill Wohl, HP's chief communications officer, the two companies... Read more...
The verdict has come on Apple's filing against Samsung to ban all Galaxy products across Europe, and the results are a mixed bag. A judge in The Hague handed down the ruling yesterday, awarding Apple a preliminary injunction barring Samsung from importing, distributing, or selling its Galaxy S, Galaxy SII, and Ace smartphones in the EU. The verdict was awarded based on Apple's claims that Samsung's Android-based Galaxy smartphones infringed on a patent for a "Portable Electronic Device for Photo Management." Samsung has to stop sales of the device by October 13. Surprisingly, Samsung's Galaxy Tab,... Read more...
When Apple won its initial injunction request against Samsung ten days ago, it was noted that the company had a separate legal proceeding underway in the Netherlands that was aimed at a similar goal. New information suggests that Apple's requests in this case are much broader and aimed at disassembling Samsung's ability to sell products in Europe at virtually every level. Apple's filing requests injunctive relief across Samsung's entire line of Galaxy products including the Galaxy Ace, S, and S II, the Galaxy Tab 7 and 10.1, and the Galaxy Gio, Nexus, 551, Europa, Apollo, and Mini. The Cupertino-based... Read more...
According to Samsung, Apple's request to the EU for an injunction against the Galaxy Tab 10.1 caught it completely by surprise. If that's true, Motorola may be in for a shock as well. Buried within Apple's injunction request is a reference to a similar request related to Motorola's Xoom. Apple and Motorola are currently engaged in their own nasty patent lawsuit in the US, but the Cupertino company's decision to open a European front passed under the radar. As FOSS Patents points out, Apple's decision to delay filing its injunction request could work against the company. German lawyers, according... Read more...
When the Department of Justice and Microsoft hammered out the terms of their agreement in 2001, one of the strictures was that the software giant would be subject to official DOJ oversight for a period of five years. In 2006, the DoJ opted to extend the term another five years, but the government body won't be doing the same thing again. On May 12, Microsoft will no longer be subject to special federal oversight. Analysts anticipate we'll see Microsoft making some bolder moves as a result, though no one anticipates a return to the old days. Rob Enderle, principle analyst at Enderle Group, told... Read more...
Historically, when the EU and Microsoft have dealt with each other, the latter has been under investigation by the former amid allegations of anti-competitive practices, bad faith negotiation, and interference with an investigation. It's therefore strange to read that Microsoft, of all companies, has filed a complaint against Google with the EU. A recent blog post by Brad Smith, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, explains the company's reasoning. we’re concerned by a broadening pattern of conduct aimed at stopping anyone else from creating a competitive alternative... We’ve... Read more...
Late last week, the Special Master in the Intel antitrust cases ruled against combining a wide range of complaints into a single class-action suit. The decision has been broadly seen as a victory for Intel—it's one of the few judicial or administrative rulings that have gone the CPU manufacturers way in the past five years—and it likely writes finis to a number of cases filed in the wake of AMD's original antitrust suit back in 2005. Special Master Vincent Poppiti found insufficient evidence to suggest that class action status should be granted, noting that the independent claims fell... Read more...
One charger to rule them all? That's the idea, at least. We have heard conversation back-and-forth over this matter for some time now, with certain entities feeling that a single charging standard for all mobile phones would benefit the consumer greatly. Of course, ideas such as these are always easier stated than accomplished, but there's nothing wrong with lofty goals. And as we have seen in the past, the European Commission usually gets what the European Commission wants. Case in point: these guys and girls felt that Microsoft had a leg-up on the competition in the Browser space, so they required... Read more...
With the World Cup over and the sound of vuvuzelas thankfully fading away, you might think it's time for business as usual to begin again. Toshiba, however, appears hooked on the excitement, fun, and motonous buzzing a PR crisis can deliver. Back in early June, the company ran a series of ads in Germany, England, Portugal, Italy, and Spain. The terms were (seemingly) simple:  Buy a Toshiba product prior to the end of the world cup, and if your team won it all, Toshiba would refund your purchase. According to our crack team of translators, if Team Red wins, you win. Provided you used your Toshiba... Read more...
Intel released its quarterly earnings last night, revealing yet another record-breaking quarter. This is the third time in four quarters that the company has managed to break one record or another; the results imply that the IT industry continues to recover slowly. All of Intel's financial indicators were up; the company earned $10.8 billion in revenue with a net income of $2.9 billion. The PC Client Group (think desktops, netbooks, and notebooks) grew by two percent in Q2 with record mobile shipments. Server revenue, which was extremely weak in 2009, has begun to recover; revenue in the Data Center... Read more...
Back in December of last year, the FTC filed an antitrust lawsuit against Intel, alleging that the CPU giant had abused its market position and limited sales of competitive products from the likes of AMD and NVIDIA. We've heard very little about the case since then, but the company and FTC have just jointly filed a request to suspend litigation proceedings until July 22 in order to evaluate a proposed deal. No details have been made public regarding the proposed resolution and both Intel and AMD have refused to discuss the arrangement. An unnamed spokesperson from NVIDIA told Mercury News that... Read more...
Micron, Samsung, Hynix, Infineon, NEC, Hitachi, Mitsubishi, Toshiba, Elpida and Nanya. Ten companies, some of which you have definitely heard of before, all of which are being hit with some very bad news this week from the European Union. The European Commission branch this week handed down their first settlement in an ongoing investigation into cartel-like activities between these parties, which purportedly helped to "fix prices" in order to keep DRAM prices artificially high. This isn't completely unusual. We have also seen big-name companies in the LCD world hit with similar fines, and the EU... Read more...
In the United States, discussions of copyright protection and infringement inevitably revolve around the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, or DMCA. Since it passed twelve years ago, the DMCA has become the weapon of choice for US companies seeking to fairly protect their property as well as institutions attempting to unfairly silence criticism by alleging infringement. For several years now, a draft treaty that would regulate copyright internationally has been making the rounds. ACTA—the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement—is meant to take the most draconian provisions of the DMCA, "improve" them,... Read more...
A ground-breaking event is about to occur in Europe, and it's probably not something that most will expect. It's not some sort of UFO landing or global climate pattern; instead, it's a move by Microsoft that could very well change the browser world forever. Awhile back, the European Commission found it unlawful for Microsoft to sell their operating systems with a single, pre-built-in Web browser. Basically, the EU argued that Microsoft wasn't giving consumers a choice in their Web browser, while no integrated document processors or A/V editing software was bundled (as an example). Microsoft has... Read more...
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