Items tagged with DRM

It may have taken Ubisoft a hundred million years to figure out that honest-to-goodness consumers really, really despise always-on Digital Rights Management (DRM) schemes, but bless the publisher's heart for finally caving. Actually, Ubisoft did away with always-on DRM over a year ago, but is just now making it official. "We have listened to feedback, and since June last year our policy for all of PC games is that we only require a one-time activation when you first install the game, and from then you are free to play the game offline," Ubisoft's Worldwide Director for Online Games, Stephanie Perotti,... Read more...
There's something funky going on in Apple's App Store that's corrupting several iOS apps, causing them to crash immediately on launch. The issue reportedly affects over 70 apps, including some high profile ones like Instapaper and Angry Birds Space (free edition). Instapaper creator Marco Arment first noted the issue when, just moments after Apple approved his Instapaper 4.2.3 update, he was bombarded by support emails and Twitter messages complaining that his app was crashing, even when performing a clean install. "This didn't make sense -- obviously, Apple had reviewed it, and it worked for them.... Read more...
UltraViolet. Heard of it? Not surprising. It's the movie industry's big-money shot at curtailing piracy, and while loads of companies are onboard, few people have heard of it -- let alone understand it. One major factor is that Apple, a leader selling of media online, isn't onboard with the program, and these days, it's tough to win in media distribution if Apple isn't on your side. All of that aside, UltraViolet is hoping to get a major push by teaming up with a major retailer: Walmart. According to the Wall Street Journal, Walmart is talking with UltraViolet in order to bring a service to stores... Read more...
Strangely, it feels like DRM is getting a second wind. When Apple announced that the iTunes Music Store would go DRM-free, the world took notice. A few years later, DRM is creeping back, and we suspect this wave will be harder to stop. Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group, SanDisk and Western Digital have all aligned on one thing: DRM, or piracy protection. The working title of the group is Project Phenix, and it's described as an initiative that will give consumers an easier and faster way to organize, store and move their high definition digital movies... Read more...
DRM? Yeah, it's still a thing. Today at CES, Rovi announced Rovi Digital Copy Solution, a DRM solution that'll enable onsumers to access their physical DVD and Blu-ray Disc movie collections via the cloud. Rovi Digital Copy Solution integrates into consumer electronics devices and PC applications, allowing them to recognize a movie on physical disc, authenticate its origin, and then trigger access to a copy from the UltraViolet Digital Library. Digital copies can then be enjoyed by consumers from virtually anywhere on a range of enabled connected devices that may include HDTVs, Blu-ray Disc players,... Read more...
Looking for a last minute gift idea? Time is running out, but if you have $5 to spare, a sense of humor, and want to flip the finger at big media companies who insist on shackling their content with sometimes draconian-level DRM schemes, you need to purchase Louis C.K.'s "Live at the Beacon Theater" comedy download. Many of you already have. Louis C.K. cut out all the middlemen and made his performance available for purchase on his website for a Lincoln note, which entitles you to download the 720p video up to three times and watch it wherever and whenever you want. There's no DRM, just a reasonably... Read more...
Game publishers are in love with DRM, even the Draconian kind that every once in awhile causes an uproar in the gaming community. Remember Spore? It initially shipped with a three-activation limit, and like baseball, three strikes and you're out. This limit was later relaxed by Electronic Arts, who upped it to five activations and made it possible to de-authorize machines, but only after it became a huge controversy. Anti-DRM advocates even went so far as to trash Spore's rating on Amazon with negative reviews and 1-star votes without having purchased the game, and to this day, Spore is only rated... Read more...
Avid Steam users and otherwise enthusiastic indie game players are well-acquainted with the Humble Indie Bundle, a semi-annual drive offering collections of independently released computer games for direct download, free of digital rights management (DRM). Two of these bundle drives have been completed thus far, raising over $1.25 million and $1.8 million in sales, respectively. The third bundle drive is currently underway. and has already broken the $1 million mark. This is quite an impressive accomplishment, considering that customers are allowed to pay what they want for the entire package.... Read more...
Well, this is some news that is sure to frustrate gamers: Ubisoft has decided that it will continue implementing its special constant-connection anti-piracy measures because, to nobody's surprise, it works. The company's restrictive digital rights management (DRM) system, which was recently announced to be included in upcoming release Driver: San Francisco, became infamous after being featured in the two most recent Assassin's Creed Games and a few of Ubisoft's other titles. The DRM requires users to constantly be connected to the internet while playing their games, lest they be signed out of their... Read more...
Contrary to what DRM-obsessed publishers would have everyone believe, gamers aren't a bunch of pilfering pirates looking for a free ride. Put out a solid software title and game players will happily reach into their pockets, even when they don't have to. That's the lesson game publishers should take from the Humble Indie Bundle project. The Humble Indie Bundles are collections of DRM-free games from independent developers in which customers get to set their own price. Five games are included in the latest edition (and third installment) of the Humble Indie Bundle, including Crayon Physics Deluxe,... Read more...
Does the mobile realm really need another way to download music? Competition is almost always a good thing for consumers, but we're guessing that Sprint's new service will have a tough time rivaling the likes of iTunes. Sprint Music Plus is the new service, powered by RealNetworks and capable of delivering ringtones and songs. All of the content is DRM-free, and Sprint will be selling bundles that include full track music, albums, ringtones and ringback tones for between $0.69 and $1.29 per song. The service allows users to create music playlists, assign ringback tones for different callers, organize... Read more...
Cloud-based services are definitely all the rage these days, but there's hardly a better name for a new cloud service than this: Unifi. A tasteful play on words, this new solution was announced this week at MWC by RealNetworks, who is revealed a new personal media cloud service for carriers to potentially offer clients. The first operator to sign on is Vodafone Germany, as their version will go live in the first half of this year. Unifi lets users organize, access and enjoy the photos, music and videos they own on any Internet-connected device. Vodafone Germany will be the first operator to offer... Read more...
It's hard to compete against Apple. A few years back, SanDisk's CEO stated that no one could "out iPod the iPod," and to this day, everyone that has tried hasn't succeeded. Even Microsoft has let the Zune family die down, despite spending tons of cash marketing it as a major iPod competitor. Apple has just been on fire over the last decade, and hardly anything from Cupertino has been more successful than iTunes. It didn't take long for iTunes to trump Wal-mart as America's largest seller of music, and now that it is expanded internationally, who knows what record iTunes will grab next. It's clear... Read more...
Sony's attempts to prevent piracy on both the PS3 and PSP have taken a number of blows in recent weeks. Today, the company announced that it intends to sue the PS3 hacker GeoHot, who's been an increasingly large thorn in the company's side over the past 18 months. When Sony released the 3.21 firmware update that broke Other OS functionality, it was GeoHot who first demonstrated his own custom firmware running both 3.21 and Other OS simultaneously. For more information on the repercussions of Sony's decision and its anti-piracy efforts to that date, check our original coverage here. Let's recap... Read more...
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