Items tagged with CPU

It has been more than a year since AMD launched its last major update to the top end FX processor line -- the FX-9590. The company has been quiet in the face of Intel's high-end launches, but today AMD is shipping a new CPU that's aimed at multi-core performance enthusiasts who don't want a furnace sitting on their motherboards, and prefer more modest power consumption and quiet computing. The new FX-8370, FX-8370E, and FX-8320E are familiar in many ways. These cores are still based on the older Piledriver architecture that debuted in 2012, they can still process two threads per module and four... Read more...
A new Nintendo 3DS is on the horizon, and we sincerely hope it’s not really called “New 3DS,” as today’s Nintendo Direct suggests. Surely, the venerable game maker can come up with a better name than that for the latest version of its handheld – but a lame name is going to be the least of Nintedo’s concerns: the upcoming Xenoblade Chronicles game will only play on the New 3DS models, thanks to a new processor. So far, Xenoblade is the only game that will be limited to the New 3DS, but it seems to be a fair bet that there will be similarly-restricted games down... Read more...
Intel Unveils Haswell-E 8-Core Beast Of A Desktop CPU Intel has officially launched their Core i7-5960X high-end, Haswell-E desktop processor today. Unlike Ivy Bridge-E, which maxed out at 6 cores (12 threads), Haswell-E is an 8-core beast of a machine (16 threads), featuring execution units based on Intel’s latest desktop microarchitecture. The Core i7-5960X has a base clock of 3GHz with Turbo Boost speed to 3.5GHz and will have up to 20MB of shared L3 cache. It also features an integrated quad-channel memory controller with official support for DDR4 memory at speeds up to 2133MHz, although... Read more...
We have been eagerly anticipating the release of processors based on Intel’s Haswell-E microarchitecture for quite some time. After about three years of incremental performance improvements at the ultra-high end, as Sandy Bridge-E was eventually replaced by similarly clocked Ivy Bridge-E based processors, the rumored specs of Haswell-E were enticing. Unlike Sandy Bridge-E and Ivy Bridge-E, which maxed out at 6 cores (12 threads) with desktops variants, Haswell-E would be an 8-core machine (16 threads), featuring execution units based on Intel’s latest microarchitecture. Assuming similar... Read more...
If Intel's recent 14nm Broadwell Y unveil has made anything clear, it's that the company is now determined to go toe-to-toe with every foundry manufacturer at the 14nm node. It wasn't initially clear if this would be the case. While Intel made a big splash with its first 14nm announcements, news of the delays and a robust rebuttal from TSMC concerning the health and capability of its own 20nm and 16nm offerings made it seem as though Intel might have been rocked back on its heels and fighting a defensive front. Where other semiconductor manufacturers have openly acknowledged the end of Moore's... Read more...
Emulating the behavior of a human brain is one of the toughest challenges scientists and engineers have ever faced. A major reason for that is the sheer amount of computational power our brains possess. Feel dumb because you turned the coffee machine on and forgot to add the water? Don't fret - your brain is still an amazingly complex thing. Today's computers, and especially supercomputers, offer an incredible level of performance, but they operate in a far stricter way than our brains, with its many neurons, do. They can, and have emulated the human brain to a great extent in the past, but it's... Read more...
AMD updated its family of Kaveri-based A-Series APUs for desktop systems today. We first took an official look at Kaveri back in January, when we evaluated the A8-7600 APU. That particular APU is being re-launched today at a new price point, but AMD is also introducing a couple of new APUs as well, namely the A10-7800 and the A6-7400K. As their names suggest, the A10-7800 is a somewhat higher-end APU than the A8-7600 we initially evaluated, and the A6-7400K is a lower-end variant with fewer cores. We’ve got an A10-7800 in hand and have run it through an array of benchmark to show you what... Read more...
AMD updated its family of Kaveri-based A-Series APUs for desktop systems today. We first took an official look at Kaveri back in January, when we evaluated the A8-7600 APU. That particular APU is being re-launched today at a new price point, but AMD is also introducing a couple of new APUs as well, namely the A10-7800 and the A6-7400K. As their names suggest, the A10-7800 is a somewhat higher-end APU than the A8-7600 we initially evaluated, and the A6-7400K is a lower-end variant with fewer cores. The Updated AMD Kaveri-Based APU Line Up - Find Them At Amazon The complete breakdown of AMD’s... Read more...
When Nvidia unveiled its GeForce Experience application last year, AMD was quick to return fire, but the company's version of the Raptr software client lagged Nvidia's application in several areas. While both could be used to optimize a game for best performance, Raptr (nee Gaming Evolved) didn't have the same ability to record or stream in-game footage. The company claims to have solved that problem with version 4.0 of the Gaming Evolved App, with the new ability to broadcast to Twitch, record footage to the hard drive, optimize games at the push of a button, and with new support for webcam overlays... Read more...
AMD reported its second quarter results today, and the stock market is anything but happy with the numbers -- in the past hour, the stock has shed more than 18% of its value, plunging from $4.57 to $3.86 as of this writing. Given the size of the plunge, you'd think the company had just announced its own imminent collapse. In reality, the company had a reasonably good second quarter -- total revenue rose 24% year-on-year, to $1.4B (up from $1.16B). Shifting Revenues Part of what the market seems to be reacting to is the continued decline of AMD's APU business. Sunnyvale's Computing Solutions revenue... Read more...
One of the trickiest aspects to launching a major new platform update is the chicken and egg problem. Without any hardware to test on or take advantage of, developers are leery of committing to supporting new hardware features. Without software that takes advantage of new hardware capabilities, customers aren't willing to pay for new equipment. We normally think about this problem as strictly an end-user issue, but it actually pops up in multiple contexts -- it's tougher to sell chip designers on a major microarchitecture update if they can't experiment with the product first. Today, ARM is tackling... Read more...
Intel today made a splash at the International Supercomputing Conference in Leipzig, Germany by revealing new details about its next-generation Xeon Phi processor technology. You may better recognize Xeon Phi by its codename, Knights Landing, which we covered in some detail earlier this year. No matter what you call it, this represents a significant leap in High Performance Computing (HPC) that will deliver up to three times the performance of previous generations while consuming less power. A big part of the reason for this is the construction of a new high-speed interconnect technology called... Read more...
For years, we've heard rumors that Intel was building custom chips for Google or Facebook, but these deals have always been assumed to work with standard hardware. Intel might offer a different product SKU with non-standard core counts, or a specific TDP target, or a particular amount of cache -- but at the end of the day, these were standard Xeon processors. Today, it looks like that's changing for the first time -- Intel is going to start embedding custom FPGAs into its own CPU silicon. The new FPGA-equipped Xeons will occupy precisely the same socket and platform as the standard, non-FPGA Xeons.... Read more...
Intel has been slowly releasing information about its Devil’s Canyon processors for a few months now. If you’ve been on top of the processor scene, you probably know that Devil’s Canyon is the codename for a new revision of Intel’s 4th Gen Core processors, based on the Haswell microarchitecture, that features a high performance polymer thermal interface material (TIM) and updated packaging materials, in addition to an array of additional capacitors to smooth power delivery to the core. The Devil’s Canyon details Intel had strategically released up until a few days... Read more...
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