Seagate Barracuda Green 2TB Hard Drive Review - HotHardware

Seagate Barracuda Green 2TB Hard Drive Review

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Advanced Format (AF) Technology
Advanced Format is the name for a new data structure format that defines an increase in the basic sector size used on hard drives. The new technology allows the hard drive industry to deliver higher capacity drives with additional error correction capability. This is done by increasing the size of a sector from 512 to 4096 bytes, and thus reducing the amount of space used for sector separation and addressing, while increasing the space used for error detection and correction codes.

Why should you care? The benefit for consumers will arrive in the form of higher capacity drives, lower costs per gigabyte, and increased reliability. All hard drive companies are migrating away from the legacy sector size of 512 bytes to 4096 bytes, and have agreed to fully adopt the Advanced Format standard by January 2011 for new models shipping into the notebook and desktop markets. This transition will provide HDD engineers with another tool to improve areal densities and error correction.

A negative side effect of Advanced Format is potential performance degradation in some configurations. This happens when partitions are not aligned properly during installation. But to avoid this problem, Seagate has created SmartAlign technology to resolve partition misalignment issues.


 


 

SmartAlign Technology
Seagate SmartAlign is hard drive firmware tool that manages read-modify-write conditions resulting from partition misalignment conditions, which are associated with the use of 4K sector drives (Advanced Format). Note that SmartAlign does not realign partitions, rather it manages read-modify-write conditions dynamically inside the drive without utilizing host PC resources.

The advantage of this technology is its ability to resolve issues in real time, without having to manually run partition alignment software at any point. Without SmartAlign, read-modify-write conditions might negatively impact HDD performance. 

 



Here are the detailed specs of the drive from Seagate. As previously mentioned, the 5900 RPM spindle speed should give it an edge over competitive low power drives on the market. The advertised seek times and latency are better than the competition's but we'll put these claims to the test.


After a quick format, the drive shows up w/ 1.81 TB of free space. The following pages consist of the performance results of the Barracuda Green drive, so let's find out how well it fared.

 

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Sweet, i'm a big fan of Green, low RPM hard drives, especially for mass storage and backup. I have a 1tb, and just got a 1.5tb WD green hdds. The 1.5 is used as an external back up and its Great! low rpm, less energy, 64mb cache.... it spins faster when needed and soo on. Though, i'm assuming they have low mtbf's. I'm really interested in those Hitachi drives that were posted here a few weeks ago. Those things looks amazing, like, an average of likr 15 years life-span realistically.

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Just one tip for the future... Majority of sales of "green" drives can be attributed to people who buy them for their NAS and HTPC devices. Dedicating 6 pages to all sorts of performance testing, and not a single page to power usage, temperature and seek/idle noise testing is a bit daft.

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I'm a little confused, why would you pick a low RPM hard drive like the green series over, say something like the WD black line?

Doesn't that lower RPM decrease the performance and speed your computer can access information?

And do green hard drives have a longer usage life because they spin slower, thus meaning less wear and tear or do companies design hard drives to last as long as possible and accommodate factors like speed the disk spin?

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The greens use a little less power and usually make less noise. This is good for Living room boxes and where ever quiet is a plus.

I personally use faster 7200 RPM drives with 64MB Memory Caches on them because I like performance in a rotational drive first. It's just my own preference though.

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Oh, I see now. Thanks realneil

and Yeah in my current computer I've got a 1TB WD Black, at 7200RPM and a 64MB cache and 6GB/S transfer rate since I figured it'd give me the best speed for a spinning disk hard drive

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Hi everyone, 

I have a questions about the SmartAlign technology on this Seagate drive.

Let's say I buy this drive and use it for data only in a Windows XP system. After a few months, i decide to buy a new PC that runs on Windows 7.

Will I be able to still view and retain the data on this drive if I just plug it out of the win xp PC and plug it into the new Windows 7 PC?

Thanks in advance.Smile

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Any ideas to my question? Thanks

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You should be looking on the Seagate support forums for this. Any problems people are having will be apparent there.

Seagate Paper on Smartalign Technology

I would just do it, but I would back the data up on another drive first. I don't think that you'll have any problems with it, but it's just a guess on my part since I haven't used XP for years.

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Thanks man.

I just found it strange because I read through the whole Seagate FAQs as well as the detailed introduction to SmartAlign. And I did not find any mention of the extremely common Scenario that i have suggested earlier.

I mean who would want to buy a hdd (for the storage of data, i.e. no operating system installed on it) that will be compatible with Win XP but loses all the data when used in a Windows 7 system?

Was hoping that Seagate would have clarified this Key and Common Issue with hardware reviewers. Smile  

I'm sure I'm not the only one that would be interested in the answers.

Thanks again for your help.

 

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