Samsung SSD 840 EVO 250GB & 1TB Drives Tested - HotHardware

Samsung SSD 840 EVO 250GB & 1TB Drives Tested

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Externally, there’s not much to see in regards to Samsung SSD 840 EVO series drives. They conform to the same 2.5-inch form factor as most other consumer-class solid state drives and feature a basic, brushed metal enclosure with Samsung’s logo, an 840 EVO emblazoned on the top, and serial number and other identifying information on the bottom.

The drives feature a 7mm Z-Height, though as we mentioned earlier, shims to beef up the drive to 9mm for some mobile platforms will also be offered.

The 840 EVO series enclosures are secured using a trio of pentalobe screws, which are more obscure than the typical Torx or even Hex screws used on most other drives. Should you have the necessary tools to open one of these babies up, however, you’d see that even these relatively svelte 7mm, 2.5” enclosure are way bigger than they need to be.



 

The guts of the two drives you see pictured here are for the 250GB and 1TB versions. As you can see, the PCB for the 250GB drive barely fills 1/3 of the enclosure. And the 1TB is not all that much bigger.

Both of the drives feature an updated, triple-core Samsung MEX controller, which operates at 400MHz. The controller is fundamentally similar to the triple-core MDX controller used in the original 840 series, though the MDX controller operated at only 300MHz. The 840 EVO’s MEX controller has also been updated to support the SATA 3.1 spec, which incorporates a few new features, like support for queued TRIM commands, for example.

Along with the new controller, all of the Samsung 840 EVO series drives feature some LPDDR2-1066 DRAM cache memory. The 120GB drive sports 256MB of cache, the 250GB and 500GB drive have 512MB of cache, and the 750GB and 1TB drives have 1GB of cache. All of the Samsung 840 EVO drives are also outfitted with 19nm TLC NAND flash memory of varying capacities. The 250GB drive features two pieces of NAND (128GB, each), while the 1TB drive has 8 pieces (128GB, each). If you do the math, however, you’ll file that both drives leave roughly 9% of the NAND capacity for over-provisioning, which is typical of many current SSDs.


TurboWrite In Action

In addition to using a bleeding edge 19nm manufacturing process, Samsung has also dedicated a small portion of the TLC NAND to act like an SLC write buffer—Samsung calls the feature TurboWrite. This allows the TLC NAND to perform more like a MLC drive for writes, as long as the buffer isn’t exhausted. On the 250GB drive, about the TurboWrite buffer is about 3GB; that number increases to 12GB on the 1TB drive.

TurboWrite should allow the 840 EVO series to perform very well in the vast majority of consumer-class workloads. As you can see in the screencap above (taken from HD Tune using the 1TB drive), writes are much faster when the TurboWrite buffer is being utilized, and then taper off.

Another interesting feature of the Samsung SSD 840 EVO series is dubbed RAPID. RAPID is an acronym for Real-Time Accelerated Processing of I/O Data. It is a feature of Samsung’s Magician software (v4.2 or newer) that can speed up the drive significantly and can be enabled with a single-click (followed by a reboot).

Samsung acquired NVELO a while back, which was a company known for its SSD caching technology. NVELO’s software was used to accelerate hard drive transfers by buffering the most commonly accessed bits of data from the hard drive onto a faster SSD. Well, RAPID works in a similar manner, but in the case of the Samsung 840 EVO series of drives, RAPID caches the most commonly accessed bits of data on the SSD into faster system memory. The size of the cache will dynamically adjust based on available system resources, and it follows the cache flush commands of the OS, so the risk of losing data due to an unexpected power outage isn’t much higher than a typical system using write buffering. The algorithms for RAPID are specifically tuned for solid state transfers, however, and are far more effective than any current-gen OS cache.
 

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The 1TB drive is drool worthy.

(honestly, they all are)

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I bought a 250, cannot wait for rome total war with my new rig. I also found games like OOTP Baseball run 10x times better on SSDs.

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How does the drive perform when it's the primary boot drive with an OS on it and filled 25%,50 % and 75%.

Who uses their SSD with 0% of data on it and not as the boot drive?

What good are reviews of empty drives tested from another drive that's in safe mode.

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It's all relative. If you want that kind of data, just look at out IOMeter tests. It near fills the drive and then hits it with a continuous read/write pattern of random workloads. You're asking an interesting question but if you look at the data and actually read about the testing, the information you're looking for is in there.

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SmogHog:
Who uses their SSD with 0% of data on it and not as the boot drive?

On one of my PCs, I use a 256GB SSD as boot drive and I have a 120GB SSD as my Steam drive.

I have a 480GB SSD that's going into another PC soon. It will be my OS drive and a 240GB SSD will be the Steam drive on it.

Both PCs will have platter drives for mass storage. SSD Prices have dropped a lot in the past few years,........

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Solid-state drives are one of the best drivers on the market but they have a very high pricetag like this one for instance Samsung 840 EVO Series 1TB SSD it has a pricetag of $799. I have noticed that the price range solid-state drives start as low as $75 for a 30 gigabyte up to $799 for 1 TB. I am currently running a 256 GB hard drive I would like to upgrade the prices to high from me to buy one it would be nice one day see the prices drop down to a point where it would be affordable to upgrade to a new hard drive.

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Check out amazon, the 1TB is 539... http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-Electronics-2-5-Inch-Internal-MZ-7TE250BW/dp/B00E3W1726/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1385755631&sr=1-1

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$799 for 1TB!! No way!! this is too expensive & not sure on the reliability aspect as well since this happens to be recently launched. I am quite contented & happy with my 240GB Kingston hyperx 3K boot volume. The advantage I notice in my piece of hardware is the sandforce controller which is very smart in terms of incompressible data handling & also manages the overall performance of the SSD better!

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For those of us who are curious about the longevity of the new 19nm TLC there is an endurance test recently launched over at http://ssdendurancetest.com

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I would be amazing to get this, these are such great drives. Maybe one day ;)

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