Samsung Galaxy S 4G Android Smartphone Review

4 thumbs up

The Samsung Galaxy S 4G has a look and feel that's similar to other phones in the Galaxy S line-up. After all, it has the same display, backlit buttons, and candy bar form factor. It does have a few styling differences, such as the chrome edging and back cover with a silver and charcoal gradient. We've liked the look and feel of other Galaxy S devices, so the similarities are fine by us. Overall, the phone is a good-looking device that's comfortable to hold.

Click to enlarge

Samsung's 4-inch Super AMOLED Screen with a resolution of 480x800 covers the majority of the front of this phone. Above the display, there's a VGA camera for video chat. Below the screen, there are four backlit buttons (Menu, Home, Back, and Search) that are flush with the screen and provide haptic feedback when pressed.

Although the phone has a similar design and look as some other Android devices we've seen, its weight is less than other handsets we've seen recently. Here's how the Galaxy S 4G compares:

Samsung Galaxy S 4G 4.2 ounces
Samsung Captivate
4.5 ounces
Nexus S
4.55 ounces
HTC Droid Incredible
4.6 ounces
Apple iPhone 4
4.8 ounces
Motorola Droid X
5.47 ounces
Samsung Epic 4G
5.47 ounces
HTC EVO 4G
6 ounces

The Galaxy S 4G has rounded edges and corners. The back plastic battery cover has a smooth finish. The cover doesn't feel very sturdy when removed from the phone, but it's no worse than other plastic covers we've seen in the past.

During our review, we noticed fingerprints will collect on the Galaxy S 4G's screen, but they didn't appear to affect performance. Moreover, fingerprints didn't collect any worse than on other smartphones. When put side-by-side with the Nexus S and its anti-fingerprint coating, however, you'll definitely notice a difference in the amount of fingerprints that collect on these two phones.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

On the left side of the Galaxy S 4G, you'll find a volume rocker. The right edge of the phone houses the power button. On the top edge of the phone, there's a microUSB port with a sliding cover and a 3.5mm headset jack. Beneath the battery cover, you'll find the Galaxy S 4G's preinstalled 16GB microSD card.

Click to enlarge

Article Index:

0
+ -

Also don't forget that unless the FTC/FCC blocks the sale of T-Mob to AT&T, this phone will only be good for a year or so.

+1
+ -

How do you figure that? AT&T will fold in T-Mo's network when it's all settled.

0
+ -

In the case of carrier buyouts in the past, phones have been carried over and allowed to work on the "new" carriers' network. Since AT&T and T-Mobile both use GSM, I don't see why this phone couldn't work on AT&T's network assuming the buyout goes through.

0
+ -

In about 2 years or so tmobile's phones wont work. ATT wants to use the current 4g 1700mhz for their LTE rollout. This is a good phone, but i like the mytouch 4g more. It just has more features that i like.

0
+ -

Ya what dave said makes more sense infinityz, AT&T won't remove all the current tmobile users, its still a source of income and part of AT&T then.

As for LLECompte, who keeps a phone for more then 2 years? :P lol

Does the whole unit not look like an iphone? xD even the app display is similar :P But im looking for a good android phone to switch to, so lets keep those choices coming!

0
+ -

All, it doesn't matter that they are both GSM.  They use different freqs which are not compatible.  AT&T has already stated that all T-Mobile customers will need a new phone within a year since they are changing over the T-Mobile spectrum for their LTE.  So about a year or less after the buyout, no phones sold by T-Mobile will work above EDGE.

0
+ -

InfinityzeN1:
All, it doesn't matter that they are both GSM.  They use different freqs which are not compatible.  AT&T has already stated that all T-Mobile customers will need a new phone within a year since they are changing over the T-Mobile spectrum for their LTE.  So about a year or less after the buyout, no phones sold by T-Mobile will work above EDGE.

Wait, if they're changing over the spectrum then couldn't they issue former T-Mobile customers a new SIM card. I mean certain unlocked AT&T phones are able to work when a T-Mobile SIM card is inserted, why can't the same be true for T-Mobile phones?

0
+ -

From what I have heard At&t said that T-Mobiles phones probably will not work on their network as the two networks use different frequencies, and while they may use there frequencies it would probably be for LTE. While that would make it 4G the only network this specific phone has worked on a true 4G type connection it was specifically with Sprints Wimax signal. I know because I had one when I had the EPIC on Sprint. The only physical difference was the drop down keyboard which this exact model does not have. So on a GSM network all this one has ever pulled signal wise is 3.5G signal which is not 4G in any way other than a misdirection of 4G for some money by the standards board for it.

Either way whenever At&t was capable of LTE the phones would have to be refitted for correct antennae. That is the only way they would work. That would make them 2 years old on this specific release and 4 year old units by then. Who is going to use a singular smart phone for 4 years if the even still work with a 4 year old unit.

0
+ -

Bye lblm88 have a nice life. As far as a Samung Galaxy phone the one I wanna see is the Samsung Galaxy S2. That one is sweet!

0
+ -

The Galaxy S is a sweet phone in the Galaxy family and wish that it was available on the AT&T network. I suppose I could switch providers but I want a new phone now and I’m under contract. My iPhone works well enough but I was interested in flash, and a 4G network phone so my recorded and live TV from my DISH Network employee Slingbox would download faster. I watch incessantly and now my kids have and iPhone too so we are all watching constantly. I have to buy batteries by the case. The Galaxy seems like a nice enough choice, since its light.

Login or Register to Comment
Post a Comment
Username:   Password: