P55 Motherboard Round-up: Asus, EVGA, GB, Intel, MSI

5 thumbs up

Some might say that there has never been a better time to be a PC enthusiast. Compelling new products fighting for our attention abound, as the computer hardware scene is bursting at the seams with upgrade options. For example, it wasn't long ago that AMD launched the world's first DX11 videocard and now the company features a full lineup of products at a wide variety of price points. NVIDIA's answer to the Radeon HD 5000 series has just arrived as well, and the battle for dominance in the graphics market is as fierce as ever. SSDs are also becoming increasingly more affordable, while the release of SATA 6Gbps opens the door to a new generation of faster drives. Equally important, huge 1TB hard drives can be purchased for less than $100, allowing us to backup and store copious amounts of data without breaking the bank.

No matter which of the aforementioned breakthroughs piques your interest, we all have specific reasons for choosing and buying one product over another. But during these difficult economic times, consumers need to be smarter than ever and demand more value for their money. PC hardware companies are left with the task of creating products that provide the performance we seek, while also offering compelling value.

Consequently, the demand for affordable, high performance computing components has brought about Intel's P55 chipset. Initially launched in September 2009, P55 based motherboards are attractive options for those looking to build a new, mainstream system. Its no secret that this platform was created in order to target mainstream consumers that balk at the high overall cost of a flagship X58-based system, but still want the features and performance of Intel's Nehalem microarchitecture. The demand for such products was so high that motherboard makers seemingly had no choice but to saturate the market with multiple P55-based boards that cater to almost every type of PC consumer.


We understand that shopping for a motherboard can be arduous and complicated. In particular, the mountain of choices available only adds to the challenge, especially when you analyze the different features of each board and various price points. Fret not system builder, HotHardware has recruited a small army of P55 motherboards in order to compare the features and performance of each.

P55 Motherboard Battle Royal
Let's Get It On!

  Asus P7P55D Deluxe
$220

EVGA P55 SLI
$180
  EVGA P55 Classified
 $340
  Gigabyte GA-P55M-UD4
 $150
  Gigabyte GA-P55-UD4P
 $180
  Gigabyte GA-P55A-UD6
 $250
  Intel DP55WG
 $140
  MSI P55-GD65
 $160


Our round up features boards with a wide range of price points, from the affordable Intel DP55WG to the extravagant EVGA P55 Classified.  But they all sport Intel's P55 chipset platform with processors that feature integrated memory controllers, on-die PCIe 2.0 connectivity, enhanced Turbo Mode performance, dual channel memory, and plenty of expansion options. With motherboards, companies usually offer models at several price points in order to provide options to different types of consumers. This empowers buyers--like you--to make the optimal choice for your specific situation. So, let's take a closer look at each product to see what sets them apart from the rest of the pack.

Article Index:

Prev 1 2 3 4 Next
0
+ -

sp12:
it'd be better if they just went by 'ASUS' to consolidate brand awareness

They are a knock-off brand (2002) and originally were making boards for the low end market. They became interested in the enthusiasts market before it was in vogue and everybody else started catering to them. They've had allot of original ideas over the time that they have been making boards, and have a loyal following among many home builders. So far, they seem to be holding their own and have their own brand awareness to brag about. Other than that, I don't know anything about them.

0
+ -

As a matter of fact, I haven't tried either brand. But just hearing stuff around the web, I think it is safe to generalize that Asus is better than ASRock. Whether Asus is better is not the point I'm trying to make. The point is peoples' impressions and opinions that may or may not be based on solid facts. For this reason, if they just went by Asus, Asus could have received a worse reputation that what they currently have. Asus might be thought of as lower quality.

The beauty of forming another brand like ASRock that people usually don't know of being owned by a parent company (Asus) is that they can target certain markets and even take risks that usually don't affect the parent company. So like coming out with original ideas like one motherboard that has DIMM slots for both DDR2 and DDR3, which I believe  had some stability problems, won't hurt the current brand image of Asus.

0
+ -

RyuGTX:
I think it is safe to generalize that Asus is better than ASRock

That's a safe generalization, I guess.

Here is a site to look at.

It seems as though the enthusiast crowd (worldwide) like their products. (56 'Editor's Choice', or 'Best Of' awards so far, this year)

The same site, if you take the time to look around has plenty of information concerning their 'ASRock-Only' features.

I know I'm starting to sound like a fan-boi here so let me say that I like Gigabyte boards allot too. Both manufacturers offer the latest tech for less money and less money is a language that speaks loudly to me.

I like my P55-Pro.

0
+ -

ASRock products shouldn't be bad, especially  since it was like a spin-off from Asus. They probably share a lot of information and manufacturing. The quality should be passed over to ASRock.So it should be popular with enthusiasts because this is like a bargain deal.

 

By the way, I like how they got the power and reset buttons that we all know and love that are featured on the high-end Asus boards.

0
+ -

What's weird is that a lot of Asus products have a cheaper Asrock knockoff with about the same specs.

Which in my opinion seems outright bizarre, as the Asrock are basically cheaper versions of the Asus ones... not much else.

0
+ -

sp12:

What's weird is that a lot of Asus products have a cheaper Asrock knockoff with about the same specs.

Which in my opinion seems outright weird, as the Asrock are basically cheaper versions of the Asus ones... not much else.

 

It seems pretty similar to the Toyota and Lexus brand. Lexus is owned by the Toyota Motor Corporation. It just works. Wink

 

0
+ -

sp12:

I looked up that Vapochil cooler and it's outright impressive, I"m glad you were able to keep your old cooler.

What board was it exactly?


On another note, the i7-870 actually outperforms the 920 for less, which surprises me, but makes this system look even more attractive. I definitely feel that this is the best value bar AMD's upcoming Thubans.

Even then, Intel's new setup will be out early next year, but it's still an attractive platform.

 

You mean the i7 860? The i7 870 is going for $549.99 on Newegg. It really isn't that surprising because most benchmarks aren't sensitive to the front side bus and favors the higher clock of the i7 860 even though the front side bus is smaller on the P55 and uses less memory. I'm pretty sure that is what is going on.

 

0
+ -

RyuGTX:
You mean the i7 860?

He probably did. That's what I figured when I read his comment.

0
+ -

Indeed sorry, that was a typo.

Here's another graph supporting a P55 system.

http://hothardware.com/Articles/Case-in-Pont-The-Best-CPU-under-300/?page=6

And I chanced upon another PCIe X8 vs X16

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/p55-pci-express-scaling,2517-11.html

0
+ -

Stuart21:
They gain redress on my behalf.

Well, AMD just got a 1.5 Billion Dollar "Sorry About That" check from Intel, so stick to your guns brother.

Prev 1 2 3 4 Next
Login or Register to Comment
Post a Comment
Username:   Password: