NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480: GF100 Has Landed

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For better or worse, the launch of NVIDIA's next-generation GPU architecture codenamed Fermi, a.k.a. GF100, is one of the most highly anticipated in our industry, ever. Information about the GPU has been tricking out for many months now, some of it good and some bad. Regardless of what you have chosen to believe or ignore up to this point, one irrefutable fact remains. NVIDIA is extremely late to the DirectX-11 party. There are no ifs, ands, or buts about it. Rival AMD has used the last few months to release a myriad of DX11-class cards ranging in price from under $100 to almost $700, fleshing out a top-to-bottom line-up that caters to virtually every market segment. Today NVIDIA is announcing two high-end cards, neither of which will be available for a couple of more weeks. So while this announcement is an important move for the company, NVIDIA would have liked to have made it sooner. C'est la vie.

NVIDIA may be late with their DX11-class cards, but launching strong products that compete favorably at their respective price points may erase some lingering concerns about the company and restore faith in prospective consumers. To that end, we can finally show you what NVIDIA has in store for the hardcore gamers out there. Today, NVIDIA is officially unveiling the GeForce GTX 480 and GeForce GTX 470. We have two of the flagship GeForce GTX 480 cards in house, and have tested them alongside NVIDIA's previous-gen products and AMD's Radeon HD 5800 / 5900 series, both in single and dual-card configurations. There's a lot to cover, so grab a snack, hydrate, and strap yourself in while we take NVIDIA's latest flagship for a spin around the HotHardware lab...

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 480 & 470
Specifications and Features




NVIDIA is announcing two DirectX-11 class cards today based on the GF100 GPU, the GeForce GTX 480 and the GeForce GTX 470. Each card's respective specifications and features are listed in the chart above, but we have more comprehensive explanations of the features and technology employed in the cards on the pages ahead. If, however, you'd like to brush up on some previous articles dealing with NVIDIA's products, we'd recommend taking a gander at some of the articles listed below...
 

Our GeForce 8800 GTX launch article goes in depth on the G80 GPU architecture and explains NVIDIA's CUDA GPGPU technology and the GeForce GTX 280 coverage goes in depth on the previous-gen GT200 GPU.  Also, our GeForce 8800 GT, 8800 GTS 512MB, 9800 GTX and GX2 pieces encompass the majority of our G92 GPU coverage.

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That review is almost laughable in some ways realneil.  The GTX 295 beat the GTX 480 (including their OC results) in every test.  Not to meantion that they list power consumption as a Pro.  Seriously?!  We are talking about a card that pulls more than Cross Fire configrations and runs hot enough to cook the rest of your computer.

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InfinityzeN:
The GTX 295 beat the GTX 480

I thought that the GTX 295 is a dual graphics processor?

If so, then why wouldn't it beat a single?

The dual Radeon beat it too,..........Anyway, I'm not promoting this card at all. I think it's price/performance figures are way off of what we all expected.

My 2GB EVGA GTX-285 is working wonderfully, and the 1GB XFX Radeon HD5850 is too. As I said in an earlier post, I'll probably just get another 5850 and run crossfire while waiting for the next 'Holy-Grail' to be released. This one doesn't do it for me.

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I wonder how the folks over at the green camp are reacting to all the mixed reactions their new baby is getting. Seems to me that negative or at the very least, unenthusiastic reactions outweigh positive ones. Is it possible that Nvidia knows exactly what they're doing and has some sort of sinister marketing plan?! lol

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recoveringknowitall:

I wonder how the folks over at the green camp are reacting to all the mixed reactions their new baby is getting. Seems to me that negative or at the very least, unenthusiastic reactions outweigh positive ones. Is it possible that Nvidia knows exactly what they're doing and has some sort of sinister marketing plan?! lol

I don't think so. I think they just had a lot of issues with manufacturing and are playing catch up. 

Also Hardocp reviews graphics cards weird. I personally am not a fan of their reviews. My motherboard (Intel Bonetrail 2) they gave a really bad review and gave another review of a gigabyte board with the exact same issues a great review. The bonetrail board even did better in overclocking, but they praised the gigabyte board on overclocking and slammed the intel board for its poor overclocking. Same priced boards. When people started saying this not even in a bad way, just pointed it out, they started deleting the posts and banning people. We all caught up in the eXtremesystems forums about it.  The only reviews I trust from them are PSU reviews. Kyle is a cool dude and I have talked to him a few times, but he is hot headed and I find the site hard to trust.

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bob_on_the_cob:
he is hot headed and I find the site hard to trust

I just found the review whilst looking around on the net. I don't have much experience with them either. I used to swear by Tom's Hardware reviews, but they got a major slant to their site and I stopped going there. I usually 'Google' a new part's name and read the review sites that pop up.

I found a few reviews about my Intel DP55KG board that knocked it around and said it had lackluster performance. In real life, this is just not true. I read a few reviews about my EVGA GTX-285 being a card with problems,.....not true in my case. It's wonderful to game with.

If I see allot of negative reviews about a certain part, then I'll shy away from it. Allot of great reviews mean that I'll consider it for myself if I'm in the market.

The reviews concerning this new GTX480 aren't bad, but they aren't so great either.

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recoveringknowitall:

I wonder how the folks over at the green camp are reacting to all the mixed reactions their new baby is getting. Seems to me that negative or at the very least, unenthusiastic reactions outweigh positive ones. Is it possible that Nvidia knows exactly what they're doing and has some sort of sinister marketing plan?! lol

 

Their marketing department has some work to do, that's for sure. The reception has been mixed, mostly tepid. Certainly not the "bang" that ATI produced 7 months ago.

This card blows a lot of heat, I don't know how it's going to work out as a mobile solution.

 

bob_on_the_cob:

I don't think so. I think they just had a lot of issues with manufacturing and are playing catch up. 

Also Hardocp reviews graphics cards weird. I personally am not a fan of their reviews. My motherboard (Intel Bonetrail 2) they gave a really bad review and gave another review of a gigabyte board with the exact same issues a great review. The bonetrail board even did better in overclocking, but they praised the gigabyte board on overclocking and slammed the intel board for its poor overclocking. Same priced boards. When people started saying this not even in a bad way, just pointed it out, they started deleting the posts and banning people. We all caught up in the eXtremesystems forums about it.  The only reviews I trust from them are PSU reviews. Kyle is a cool dude and I have talked to him a few times, but he is hot headed and I find the site hard to trust.

 

HardOCP: -> Negative "Overall, GF100 hasn’t exactly delivered. I think we were all hoping it would provide a substantial gameplay improvement over the Radeon HD 5870 and Radeon HD 5850."

AnandTech: -> Neutral "Bigger than price though is the tradeoff for going with the GTX 480 and its much bigger GPU – it’s hotter, it’s noisier, and it’s more power hungry, all for 10-15% more performance"

OverclockersClub: -> Positive "All things considered, NVIDIA stepped up to the plate (albeit rather late) and delivered gaming performance with visual quality."

Guru3D: -> Positive "The performance is grand and impressive and well, it's just a sick card to play all modern games with at any resolution or image quality preference."

TechSpot: -> Negative "The GeForce GTX 480 is fast but given the extra time Nvidia had to work on the card and tweak it to perfection, we would have at least expected to do without the heat/power compromises."

HardwareCanucks: -> Neutral "The GTX 480 isn’t necessarily a resounding success but we consider it to be a good stepping stone towards some much needed competition in the DX11 marketplace"

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The GTX 295 is a dual card yes.  That cost in the same price range ($500~600) and has close to the same power envelope/heat.

The fact that the GTX 295 is a dual does not matter except for saying you have the fastest "Video Chip".  People don't buy video chips, they buy video cards.  When your top of the line from the last generation cost about as much as your newest top of the line, while performing faster, that is not a good thing.

Due to its high heat and power requirements, I do not see a 400 series dual card coming out until the respin.  That will be sometime around the end of the year most likely.  Granted, their 512 card will be a little faster then the GTX 480 (We are still only talking about a 6.67% increase in processing and memory bandwidth though).

I personally have a GTX 285 in my rig as well.  It has been a rock solid and dependable card.  However, with all the trade-offs I do not see myself putting a 400 series card into my rig.  After all, it is micro atx.

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The GTX480 scales better than the ATI 5000 series. It overclocks on par with the ATI 5870 series as well, giving around a 5-7% performance boost in most cases. But again there's the heat, noise and power issues to deal with, especially if you're planning a multi-GPU config...not to mention the price tag. Two GTX480's will run you $1,000.

It's important to keep in mind that the GTX480 has a lot of hardware tessellation power that is largely untapped in most of the benchmarks. Before any games come out that can take advantage of this, we'll see fully functional GF100 cards with much better performance, heat dissipation and factory OCs.

Again, my suggestion is save your money and wait till Nvidia works out the kinks in the GTX400 series.

Oh and the GTX470...performs close to the ATI 5850, but the additional heat, noise, power and price make it largely irrelevant. You can get a 5870 for a few bucks more.

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Gibbersome.

That graph was actually relatively accurate. For that test.

Even in that video that was released a while back of that demo, showed the ATI card and the Nvidia card, neck and neck until tessellation kicked in and that's when the fermi card dominated. And if you don't consider double the fps a domination than I don't know what would.

Like I said though this card seems to be pretty great with DX11. I'd like to see more DX11 benchs..... but of course... there's really very few games out there for DX11.

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I have the benchmarks in my account on DX11 with normal Tesselation as well as all other options on the system I won (5870) in my account files "Benchmark's". It is all at stock speeds "Normal" with all options on at 4X. I had bought a 5850 (the only real upgrade it had) for my previous system and am going to Crossfire the 5870 w/the 5850 and try to up and down clock them to be the same speeds as I have heard that the difference in speeds causes some difficulties. I also am hoping this will also help with heat issues of running crossfire we will see where it goes. I may have to add the 60mm x2 optional fans which run directly next to the cards and above the PSU cage!

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