NVIDIA GeForce GTS 450 Affordable DX11 GPU

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NVIDIA may have had to navigate a tumultuous path on their way to releasing the company’s first DirectX 11 desktop GPU, the GF100-based GeForce GTX 480, though they seem to be firing on all cylinders at this point. In the last 5 or so months since the GeForce GTX 480 arrived, NVIDIA has released—or will imminently release—a slew of other new DX11-class GPUs, targeted at markets ranging from low-power thin-and-light notebooks to mid-range desktop gaming systems. And the GTX 480 remains the company’s flagship desktop product. NVIDIA has also optimized their software and drivers to wring significantly more performance from their newest GPUs. Things seem to be looking up.

The most recent NVIDIA GPU released for the desktop market, the GeForce GTX 460, proved to be an excellent performer for the money. In the conclusion of our GTX 460 coverage, we stated, “The GeForce GTX 460 is simply one of the most appealing DirectX 11-class graphics cards out there. They're affordably priced, perform very well, they're a reasonable size and quiet”. Since the GeForce GTX 460 hit the scene a couple of months ago, prices on the cards have dropped somewhat, making them even more attractive. Even with the success of the GTX 460 though, NVIDIA still doesn’t have a sub-$180 DX11 graphics card for the desktop market, and it’s at the more affordable price points that the vast majority of graphics cards are sold.

NVIDIA plans to change that today with the release of the new GeForce GTS 450. As the GTS moniker denotes, the GeForce GTS 450 is targeted at the mainstream market. And with a $129 (give or take) price tag it is certainly more affordable than any other DX11-class GPU. Whether or not it’s worth the asking price remains to be seen, however. So let’s dig in and find out what the new GeForce GTS 450 is made of and if it deserves a place in your next system.


Asus and EVGA Overclocked GeForce GTS 450 Cards

NVIDIA GeForce GTS 450
Specifications & Features



  
The NVIDIA GeForce GTS 450 GPU, Front and Back


Before we show you the actual cards, let’s take a look at the GPU powering the GeForce GTS 450. The chip at the heart of these new cards is codenamed the GF106. It is a new GPU, although it is based on NVIDIA’s Fermi architecture, like the other members of the GeForce GTX/GTS/GT 400 series. The chip is comprised of 1.17 billion transistors and it is manufactured using TSMC’s 40nm process.

Within the chip, as it is configured on the GeForce GTS 450, there is a single Graphics Processing Cluster, with 4 Streaming Multiprocessor segments consisting of 48 CUDA cores.  There are 192 CUDA cores in total. There are also 32 texture units and 16 ROPs. GeForce GTS 450 cards also feature a 128-bit memory interface. We should point out, however, that the GF106, as it is implemented on the GeForce GTS 450, isn’t fully functional.

The GF106 diagram above depicts the full GF106 chip architecture that includes one GPC, four SMs, three ROP partitions, and three 64-bit memory interfaces. The GTS 450 GPU is a version of the GF106 chip, but with only two ROP partitions and two memory interface partitions enabled.

NVIDIA goes on to explain, “Our goal with the retail version of GTS 450 is to design the best price/performance product at an aggressive MSRP while offering the highly valued 1GB memory size. The 128-bit memory configuration provides the best price/performance for these design goals.”

Now let's look at the hardware side of things.

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I am anxious to read this article Dave but I keep getting an error message since yesterday when I try to access the link.

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lonewolf:

I am anxious to read this article Dave but I keep getting an error message since yesterday when I try to access the link.

You can click on the two pictures, each one leads to the review.

Or here is a corrected link for what you're looking for.

 

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lonewolf:

I am anxious to read this article Dave but I keep getting an error message since yesterday when I try to access the link.

LOL see Dave, you guys should go back to leaving a orange link :D

 

Lonewolf, also try reading the thread as well :D

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Or you noobs could click the article from the home page lol

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I think Nvidia enjoys the fact that they have a good grasp on the gaming market. Mostly because they listen to their customers!

Simple concept really! Kinda like Sye Sperlling.....He's not only the spokesman for hair club for men, He's also a client :P

Havent had a chance to try my GTS250 Bcuz I dont play to many games. It is good to see that Nvidia is averaging out their prices to be competitive with Amd.

I know now, if I could have waited I would have gone with the New Quadros instead of being raped by the Fires :P

I always thought FTW meant...F%#@ That Wally! This article made me finally do a search.....Learn something new everyday, I always say :)

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Good card but I have to agree that after a year on the market and with AMD soon releasing their 6 series and what kind of performance it will bring might be worth the wait. 

It might be me but the bandwidth on this card seemed awfully low. I understand it is not an enthusiast card and it is recommended for 22" and below monitors, but to game decent with that low of bandwidth seems like a stretch.  The numbers say it's capable but that stood out to me.

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lonewolf:
I have to agree that after a year on the market and with AMD soon releasing their 6 series

I thought that these GTS450's were just released and are a brand new item? I too am interested in the 6K series cards soon to be released, but I wonder how much adaptation of some of NVIDIA's bling will occur? (think CUDA & PHYS-X)

ATI needs to get a handle on this stuff, or not,......

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^Unfortunately AMD had to abandon their Physics project once again since the lead guy left the project. I have no idea what the status of that is now, but its most likely dead on the water.  As for ATI stream, they just relased an improved SDK 2 months ago but they still have a long way to go before its as easy to use as CUDA or as big an adoption rate.  Just look at how big GTC 2010 will be this year (starts this week)

 

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I'd like to see them just cleave to a single standard that provides what we want to see. Then their cards could stand on their merits, and we wouldn't be losing certain capabilities just because we bought One Brand instead of the other. Propitiatory technology isn't always a good thing for the consumer.

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Technically, you aren't losing certain capabilities and its more like one manufacturer isn't making anything out of their good hardware while the other one is working hard on developing stuff for it.

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