HotHardware Holiday Gift Guide 2010

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The most awesome PC in the universe is nothing without a monitor, so we've rounded up some of our favorites from this year from least expensive to most. Good luck out there, and remember, pixels are important!
Mimo 720-F USB Monitor - $200


With Mimo's new 720-F, there's no need for fancy software. Just plug this USB monitor into your machine, mount it wherever you want and enjoy seven extra inches of pixels. This new display has an 800x480 resolution, 350 cd/m2 brightness, and 400:1 contrast, and it's touch sensitive as well. This one differs from many of the company's prior 7" screens by being compatible with VESA mounts, meaning that it can be easily installed on wall brackets, adjustable arm brackets, plus auto seats and dashboards. VESA adapters are easy to find, so this one's perfect for your own DIY install in that very random spot in your basement - for just $199.

ViewSonic 24" VG2436wm-LED monitor - $260



If you just so happen to be in the market for a new monitor, ViewSonic just so happens to have a new pair to choose from. The company's new VG36-LED Series of monitors are just being introduced this week, with two new ones in the line to start with. There's the 24" (23.6" vis.) VG2436wm-LED  and 22" (21.5" vis.) VG2236wm-LED, and outside of the physical size, most of the specifications are identical. Both units have slimmed bezels, a native 1920x1080 resolution, DVI and VGA ports a 20,000,000:1 MEGA contrast ratio and built-in stereo speakers. The company is also talking about eco-friendliness here, with each one having EPEAT Gold certifications and an energy savings of up to 50%.

Samsung 27" SyncMaster P2770FH - $349


Samsung  announced a new monitor which boasts of a 1 ms response time. With this fast response rate, the new SyncMaster P2770FH has virtually no problems with motion blur or ghosting effects, making it ideal for gamers, video enthusiasts, and graphic designers. The P2770FH also features a 70,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio and enriched color gamut. This 27-inch LCD is accented by Samsung’s Touch of Color red finish and a simple yet elegant stand. 

Planar 3D Vision Ready SA2311W Monitor - $495



Need more proof that the 3D revolution has officially begun? You got it. Planar just announced a 23-inch 3D Vision Ready monitor for mass consumption, the SA2311W. Keep in mind that Planar doesn't often put a lot of focus on the general consumer side, though the company felt compelled enough by the current 3D landscape to try and cash in on the frenzy. "The Planar SA2311W is a sleek, attractive desktop LCD monitor designed for 3D viewing, but this affordable widescreen display is ideal for 2D use as well," Planar says. "Whether you’re playing the latest 3D game or modeling complex biomolecules, the blazing fast 120Hz frame rate and 2 ms response time deliver crisp, clear images and blur—free video."

NEC PA271W Professional LCD Monitor
- $1649



Need something high-end? This is where NEC's MultiSync PA271W LCD monitor comes into play. Armed with a 10-bit P-IPS panel, internal 14-bit programmable 3D lookup tables (LUTs), and a generous 2560x1440 pixel resolution, the 27-inch PA271W is truly a professional grade tool for those instances where a typical TN panel just won't cut it.

Dell’s large, 30-inch UltraSharp U3011 widescreen LCD offers a native resolution of 2,560 x 1,600. And to help you enjoy all of the fine details of your images, Dell's TrueColor Technology produces 117% of the NTSC color gamut for superb color reproduction. The UltraSharp U3011 has a fast 7ms response time and 100,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio (1000:1 typical). You’ll get a nice variety of connection options with this monitor, including VGA, 2 x DVI-D with HDCP, 2 x HDMI, Component and DisplayPort. The U3011 also gives users the ability to adjust the height, tilt the panel forward and backward, and swivel it left-to-right. Additionally, the UltraSharp U3011 supports wide horizontal and vertical viewing angles of 178-degrees and it has a built in card reader and USB ports.


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