HP TouchSmart 600 All-In-One PC Review

10 thumbs up
With a claim of “nearly 30-years of touch innovation” under its belt, HP is no stranger to touch-input technology. The company has recently integrated touch input into a number of its consumer and business product lines, such as tablets and displays and perhaps is most well-known for its line of TouchSmart all-in-one desktop PCs. In fact, when the TouchSmart first debuted in 2007, it was one of very first multi-touch desktop PCs to hit the market, though touch technology has come a long way since then, especially with the advent of Windows 7's touch capabilities.

Taking advantage of a good thing when they see it, HP has produced a few major updates to the TouchSmart line, culminating in the latest release of the TouchSmart series, the 20-inch TouchSmart 300 series and 23-inch TouchSmart 600 series. Other than screen size and specs, both the 300 and 600 series have much in common, including a relatively thin chassis, glossy 16:9 widescreen display, and a plethora of touch-enabled features and applications.


Many of the touch features take advantage of the new and improved touch features built into Windows 7, but HP's new TouchSmart PCs also come with a bevy of custom touch-enabled apps as well.  More on these in a quick video preview we have for you here and in the pages ahead...


 
HP TouchSmart 600-1055
System Specifications

                    Direct Price (as tested): $1,499.99

Pricing for the 20-inch TouchSmart 300 series starts at 799.99, and the 23-inch 600 series starts at $999.99. We were sent the TouchSmart 600-1055, which sells for $1,499.99 (at the time of this review). All of these are the prices you would pay if you were to purchase the systems direct from HP. We were hard-pressed to find other vendors selling the system for much less--about $50 lower is the best we could find. The TouchSmart 600-1055 is a specific, non-configurable configuration--HP refers to it as a “quick-ship model;” but HP also sells versions of the 300 and 600 series that can be configured to order on HP’s site--these are the TouchSmart 300z, TouchSmart 600t, and the TouchSmart 600xt.

The TouchSmart 600-1050 is powered by a 2.13GHz Intel Core 2 Duo Mobile P7450 processor, 4GB PC3-10600 DDR3 SDRAM, Nvidia nForce 730i chipset (1,066MHz Front-side bus), Nvidia GeForce GT230M GPU (1GB), 750GB 7,200RPM SATA hard drive, slot-loading BD drive, and running Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit). The system also includes Gigabit Ethernet, 802.11b/g/n wireless networking, and Bluetooth. Rounding out the system’s feature set are integrated stereo speakers and a built-in TV tuner.

Article Index:

1 2 3 Next
0
+ -

As many of you I am sure see this, on a general consumer basis I see these as the general household PC in the future. On top of that I see smartphones, netbooks, tablets or basically mobile devices being the way a general consumer will be in the future. Everyone will have there own little personal network and that will be a general user profile for most.

0
+ -

LOL Dave! "Do you want to touch me there?" Highlights for me:

-Pretty impressed with the speaker system.

-The video card wasn't too shabby, game performance was alright, but this isn't support to be a gaming system.

-Windows 7 should help improvement in performance over the VIsta

-Wow, a ton of ports, and a Blu-Ray player

 

Very entertaining video review and an excellent written one by Daniel, very insightful.

I agree with his conclusion in that I'm also confused who this PC is aimed at. Most likely PC novices as the touch screen and customized layout makes it easy to access apps such as Netflix, e-mail. It would make a great gift for your grandma. But for more experienced users, better options can be had for the money.

 

 

 

0
+ -

Glad you liked the article gents.  Dan did a good job with it.  The system has its caveats but it's pretty nice.  I liked it a lot, personally.

0
+ -

Dave,

What is YOUR computer like? Is it a gaming machine? Does it have 12 video cards on board?

12 SSD's?   Does NORAD use it as a backup in case theirs fails?

Just curious,................

 

0
+ -

hehehe.. OK OK, I give. Here's what I'm running currently.

Core i7 975 (stock)

12GB of DDR3-1333 (stock)

Dual WD Raptor 300GB drives in RAID 1 (important files)

4X Intel X25M 80GB SSDs RAID 0 (OS volume)

1X Fusion-io card (fast access/important storage)

Dual GeForce GTX 285s in SLI (jonesing for a pair of 5870s - yes even I have to wait sometimes!)

30" HP LP3065 LCD - thinking of going to a thin bezel 3x23" or so setup...

So there you have it! :)

0
+ -

Dave_HH:

hehehe.. OK OK, I give. Here's what I'm running currently.

Core i7 975 (stock)

12GB of DDR3-1333 (stock)

Dual WD Raptor 300GB drives in RAID 1 (important files)

4X Intel X25M 80GB SSDs RAID 0 (OS volume)

1X Fusion-io card (fast access/important storage)

Dual GeForce GTX 285s in SLI (jonesing for a pair of 5870s - yes even I have to wait sometimes!)

30" HP LP3065 LCD - thinking of going to a thin bezel 3x23" or so setup...

So there you have it! :)

Indifferent

0
+ -

Obviously it is good to be a respected hardware reviewer :P

0
+ -

Soupstyle:

Obviously it is good to be a respected hardware reviewer :P


Actually, it's more like I'm just a big performance geek like you guys and these are tools of my trade too.  Those SSDs cost me big bux!

 

0
+ -

dugg! And what the heck, I'll tweet it too!

1 2 3 Next
Login or Register to Comment
Post a Comment
Username:   Password: