EVGA GTX 580 FTW Hydro Copper 2 Review

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Before bringing this article to a close, we'd like to cover a few final data points--namely power consumption and temps. Throughout all of our benchmarking and testing, we monitored how much power our test system was consuming using a power meter. Our goal was to give you all an idea as to how much power each configuration used while idling and while under a heavy workload. Please keep in mind that we were testing total system power consumption at the outlet here, not just the power being drawn by the graphics cards alone.

Power Consumption and Operating Temperatures
How low can you go?



We have good news and bad news here. The bad news should not come as a major surprise as the GTX 580 in its stock form is one power hungry video card. Our results show the overclocked EVGA HC FTW GTX 580 uses even more juice due to higher operating frequencies. But if you're considering this monster card, we can't image a few extra dollars on your electricity bill over the course of a year being a deal breaker. 





The biggest advantage a water-cooled video card has over its competition is operating temperature. Of course, it commands a price premium and requires additional hardware to implement, but water cooled models will always operate at much lower temps than their air cooled siblings, when installed and setup properly. When looking at our results, keep in mind that every liquid cooling loop is different and ambient temperature is an important factor that affects operating levels of the card.

Here, we utilized Furmark to stress the cards and saw remarkable temps in both idle and load states. How so? With the exception of Gigabyte's HD 5870 SOC, the EVGA GTX 580 FTW HC2 ran cooler at full load than the rest of the cards in an idle state. In other words, the cooling performance of the Hydro Copper 2 waterblock is outstanding.

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Maxishine has videos on youtube of these in tri-SLI on the EVGA SR-2.

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It would be more practical if they produced a stand alone pump and radiator for this! This is a niche market so they probably wont see much profit from this since full water systems are still pricey and hard to maintain.

If they made an adaptive H50 pump/radiator that is simple and can be manufactured in various sizes for multiple cards and pluged in without the need to go full water! Then they will probably see more profit from the extra sales of the add on components from making things simpler for their customers. I am sure they can easly adapt thier current CPU pump system to these cards at little or no cost for the conversion. Since more people ar switching to the sealed liquid coolers for the CPU's having a similar system for the GPU Would be the next logical step!

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I've got 3 of these running in SLI with an Intel i7 with a standalone LC system for the CPU, ASUS Rampage III Black Ed MB, 24G RAM (getting it all recognized was a trick), and modified Thermaltake Xaser VI case, with the 3 inch bays removed to make room for a 3-fan radiator and LC tubing.  Just finished getting it all put together, but it screams even before any OC.

Hints for anyone considering GTX 580 Hydro Copper - multiple card setup - you NEED a huge case, the Thermaltake I got still needed to be torn apart to fit everything.  Don't plan on using the PCI slots for much of anything else (though I was able to squeeze in the specialized sound card that came with the MB, JUST under the 3rd GPU).  Also, buy a bunch of extra clamps, and do not overtighten the valves, you'll bow the washers and create a drip.  Finally, don't get cheap on the pump.  The thing is there to protect your $2,100 worth of GPUs (3 x $700 newegg)... 

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