Dell XPS One 27 All-in-One Desktop, Ivy Bridge-Infused - HotHardware

Dell XPS One 27 All-in-One Desktop, Ivy Bridge-Infused

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Performance Summary: If you have a preconceived notion that all-in-one systems lack any kind of adrenaline, it's time you revisited the form factor. As configured, Dell's XPS One 27 hit the ground running and never let up. The combination of an Ivy Bridge processor and NVIDIA Kepler graphics resulted in some impressive benchmark runs, including the ability to game at the 27-inch display's 2560x1440 resolution, though more demanding titles will require that you dial down the visual quality settings.

In addition to pulling playable framerates in new and old games, the XPS One 27 represented itself well in Futuremark's battery of benchmarks. In PCMark Vantage and PCMark 7, Dell's system topped every other AIO we've ever tested, scoring 9,384 and 4,625, respectively. In fact, it was clean sweep across the board when comparing Dell's system to other rigs in its class, which is a testament to the march of technology and Dell's component selection and build quality.

As well as Dell's XPS One 27 did, if you're jonesing for a touchscreen experience, this isn't the all-in-one for you. It doesn't boast a touch-capable screen, and that's because Dell opted to go with a high-quality Samsung PLS panel that's absolutely stunning. At 27 inches, it's Dell's largest AIO to date with a scintillating 2560x1440 native resolution. But it's not just about sheer size; the display is crisp and vibrant, offering superb viewing angles. It really is that nice and since the PC is the display in this system and you're not able to decouple one from the other, Dell's component selection here was all that more critical.  They nailed it.

Sitting behind the gorgeous panel is a well rounded collection of hardware, including an Intel Core i7 3770S processor and NVIDIA GeForce GT 640M graphics. It's a combination that might be wasted on some mainstream users, which is probably why these parts don't come standard. As configured, the setup Dell sent us runs $1,999, though cost of entry starts at $1,399 for a Core i5 3450S and Intel HD 4000 graphics foundation. At that price, you'll also have to forgo the 32GB mSATA solid state drive, which acts as a giant cache buffer for the 1TB or 2TB (in this case, 2TB) 7200RPM hard drive, and give up the Blu-ray drive as well.  It all depends on your specific needs and budget.

Dropping two large on a system in today's economy is not a decision to be made lightly, but if you can swing that kind of investment, Dell's XPS One 27 is a sophisticated all-in-one with a killer instinct.

 

  

  • Fastest all-in-one we've tested to date
  • 27-iinch display is both big and beautiful
  • Fast mechanical storage aided by a 32GB mSATA SSD
  • Great sounding audio
  • No bloatware
  • Somewhat expensive (as configured)
  • Display isn't touch-capable

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Really nice machine by Dell here. iMac killer?

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Thanks for the review, Paul ! Frankly, I have difficulty understanding the «space-saving» hype that always accompanies this form factor - after all, the all-in-one does have to be placed on a desk or a table (somehow, I suspect that few will choose to place this 16 kg bemoth on their lap and many will probably find it difficult to move around on a desk), which means that there's always room for a system unit (box) under the desk/table, unless that space is already occupied by the family dog. That being said, this does, indeed, look like a unit of whose preformance one needn't be ashamed ; I'm particularly impressed by the inclusion of that Samsung PLS panel, which by all reports should be a joy to use and which I'm seriously considering purchasing for my latest standard build, even if it means also shelling out for a new video card with the capacity to drive the monitor (which, for comparison with regard to mobility, weights only 6.6 kg). One question remains in my mind, however - how hot will the unit run in that relatively cramped space behind the panel and therewith, how long will it last ? As you pointed out, «Drinksropping two large on a system in today's economy is not a decision to be made lightly» ; one would like to know that, e g, the motherboard isn't going to give up the ghost due to overheating and poor ventilation....

Henri

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Got to see a PLS panel in person and it is absolutely gorgeous, although I don't know if I would sacrifice the touch screen for that panel. In my opinion windows 8 is the perfect companion for AIO's but only if they have a touch screen.

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Just goes to show how ridiculously overpriced standalone 27 inch monitors that boast more than 1080p are.

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Intel says the i7-3770S is a quad-core processor - maybe you know better?

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I'm sure that was a type-o (halfway down the thrid page) when you described it as "one of Intel's new 22nm Ivy Bridge processors, a dual-core CPU clocked at 3.10GHz..." This is really a fine and thorough review by the way, though I did read elsewhere that the noise-level from the fans (and the thermal design as a whole) is a more serious issue on the XPS One 27 than you make it out be here

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Good catch and corrected, alexorangutan! Thanks. We had it listed correctly in other areas of the article.

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I just received one of these and wanted to clarify a couple of things that the reviewer got wrong.

First, the keyboard and mouse are not Bluetooth. They use a traditional USB nano-receiver just like Logitech, etc., except the receiver is hidden inside the 2710 (under a trap door on the bottom). I like the keyboard (not the mouse, so much) but mine didn't work because apparently my receiver and KB/mouse were mismatched at the factory.

Second, the back is not aluminum. It's plastic. Also, for those who want to "upgrade" their 2710, it is VERY easy to take the back off (two screws and it slides right off). Once the back cover is off, the hard drive, memory and other critical components are just a few screws from being completely accessible.

Also, for those interested, the 2710 does seem to support RAID (in the BIOS, but there are only two SATA ports, so you have to lose your DVD drive if you want to add, say, two SSD's to the system. Also, SATA 1 seems to be a 3GBps port, and SATA0 is 6GBps. Bummer.

Lastly, there is an issue (at least with mine) with the fans. Once the cooling fans ramp up during heavy usage, they stay there. They don't slow back down once things cool off. Rebooting the system resets the fans. I'm sure that's a BIOS issue of some sort. Overall, the system CPU and GPU run hotter than I think they should. The CPU is around 50C when idle and the GPU (nVidia) is in the 60C's when idle. (using HWINFO64 for readings). When I had the back off, the heatpipes and CPU heatsink were burning hot!

Overall, though, it's a nice system with the latest tech and a beautiful screen (good like an iMac!).

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Thanks for your posting, Iancorp ; it's always of great interest to hear from users who have practical experience of the system being discussed ! You seem to confirm my suspicions with respect to ventilation problems, which I suspect are going to limit the longevity of the system. I hope, however, that you don't encounter these difficulties....

 

Henri 

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Me too!  Because of the KB/Mouse problem and now the fans, I may ask for a replacement and once I receive that, I'll re-paste the CPU and GPU.

The GPU just has a heatsink/fan on it, just like a traditional video card, no heatpipe.  The CPU has the heatpipe and an exhaust fan blowing on the radiator out the top/center.  Still that heatpipe and heatsink are blazing hot!

 

 

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