Dell XPS One 27 All-in-One Desktop, Ivy Bridge-Infused - HotHardware

Dell XPS One 27 All-in-One Desktop, Ivy Bridge-Infused

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We continued our testing with SiSoftware's SANDRA, the System ANalyzer, Diagnostic and Reporting Assistant. We ran four of the built-in subsystem tests (CPU Arithmetic, Multimedia, Memory Bandwidth, Physical Disks).
 
Preliminary Testing with SiSoft SANDRA
Synthetic Benchmarks

   

At every turn, Dell's XPS One 27 posts better number than previous systems in its same class, besting every all-in-one rig we've reviewed to date. Both of these scores are well ahead of HP's TouchSmart 520, which itself posted scores about double that of the Asus ET2410. This is no surprise given what we already know about Intel's Ivy Bridge platform.

   

The Asus system referenced above used a 7200RPM hard drive, the same spindle speed as the one found in Dell's XPS One 27, yet the XPS posted a much higher drive score, averaging data transfers at 145.83MB/s versus 110MB/s (HP's system trailed all three at 94.28MB/s).

Cinebench R11.5 64bit
Content Creation Performance

Maxon's Cinebench R11.5 benchmark is based on Maxon's Cinema 4D software used for 3D content creation chores and tests both the CPU and GPU in separate benchmark runs. On the CPU side, Cinebench renders a photorealistic 3D scene by tapping into up to 64 processing threads (CPU) to process more than 300,000 total polygons, while the GPU benchmark measures graphics performance by manipulating nearly 1 million polygons and huge amounts of textures.

Dell XPS One 2710

In case you're not starting to get it, Cinebench helps drive the point home that Dell's latest AIO, as configured, is a mini-power house in a mainstream form factor. The above are great scores for what's typically a brutal benchmark designed to measure performance based on a system's ability to handle workstation rendering tasks.

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Really nice machine by Dell here. iMac killer?

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Thanks for the review, Paul ! Frankly, I have difficulty understanding the «space-saving» hype that always accompanies this form factor - after all, the all-in-one does have to be placed on a desk or a table (somehow, I suspect that few will choose to place this 16 kg bemoth on their lap and many will probably find it difficult to move around on a desk), which means that there's always room for a system unit (box) under the desk/table, unless that space is already occupied by the family dog. That being said, this does, indeed, look like a unit of whose preformance one needn't be ashamed ; I'm particularly impressed by the inclusion of that Samsung PLS panel, which by all reports should be a joy to use and which I'm seriously considering purchasing for my latest standard build, even if it means also shelling out for a new video card with the capacity to drive the monitor (which, for comparison with regard to mobility, weights only 6.6 kg). One question remains in my mind, however - how hot will the unit run in that relatively cramped space behind the panel and therewith, how long will it last ? As you pointed out, «Drinksropping two large on a system in today's economy is not a decision to be made lightly» ; one would like to know that, e g, the motherboard isn't going to give up the ghost due to overheating and poor ventilation....

Henri

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Got to see a PLS panel in person and it is absolutely gorgeous, although I don't know if I would sacrifice the touch screen for that panel. In my opinion windows 8 is the perfect companion for AIO's but only if they have a touch screen.

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Just goes to show how ridiculously overpriced standalone 27 inch monitors that boast more than 1080p are.

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Intel says the i7-3770S is a quad-core processor - maybe you know better?

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I'm sure that was a type-o (halfway down the thrid page) when you described it as "one of Intel's new 22nm Ivy Bridge processors, a dual-core CPU clocked at 3.10GHz..." This is really a fine and thorough review by the way, though I did read elsewhere that the noise-level from the fans (and the thermal design as a whole) is a more serious issue on the XPS One 27 than you make it out be here

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Good catch and corrected, alexorangutan! Thanks. We had it listed correctly in other areas of the article.

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I just received one of these and wanted to clarify a couple of things that the reviewer got wrong.

First, the keyboard and mouse are not Bluetooth. They use a traditional USB nano-receiver just like Logitech, etc., except the receiver is hidden inside the 2710 (under a trap door on the bottom). I like the keyboard (not the mouse, so much) but mine didn't work because apparently my receiver and KB/mouse were mismatched at the factory.

Second, the back is not aluminum. It's plastic. Also, for those who want to "upgrade" their 2710, it is VERY easy to take the back off (two screws and it slides right off). Once the back cover is off, the hard drive, memory and other critical components are just a few screws from being completely accessible.

Also, for those interested, the 2710 does seem to support RAID (in the BIOS, but there are only two SATA ports, so you have to lose your DVD drive if you want to add, say, two SSD's to the system. Also, SATA 1 seems to be a 3GBps port, and SATA0 is 6GBps. Bummer.

Lastly, there is an issue (at least with mine) with the fans. Once the cooling fans ramp up during heavy usage, they stay there. They don't slow back down once things cool off. Rebooting the system resets the fans. I'm sure that's a BIOS issue of some sort. Overall, the system CPU and GPU run hotter than I think they should. The CPU is around 50C when idle and the GPU (nVidia) is in the 60C's when idle. (using HWINFO64 for readings). When I had the back off, the heatpipes and CPU heatsink were burning hot!

Overall, though, it's a nice system with the latest tech and a beautiful screen (good like an iMac!).

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Thanks for your posting, Iancorp ; it's always of great interest to hear from users who have practical experience of the system being discussed ! You seem to confirm my suspicions with respect to ventilation problems, which I suspect are going to limit the longevity of the system. I hope, however, that you don't encounter these difficulties....

 

Henri 

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Me too!  Because of the KB/Mouse problem and now the fans, I may ask for a replacement and once I receive that, I'll re-paste the CPU and GPU.

The GPU just has a heatsink/fan on it, just like a traditional video card, no heatpipe.  The CPU has the heatpipe and an exhaust fan blowing on the radiator out the top/center.  Still that heatpipe and heatsink are blazing hot!

 

 

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