CyberPower Gamer Extreme 3000 Core i7 860 System - HotHardware

CyberPower Gamer Extreme 3000 Core i7 860 System

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The Gamer Extreme 3000 employs an Azza Solano 1000 full tower enclosure that seems a perfect choice to house these cutting-edge parts. Interestingly, the Solano looks very similar to the popular Antec 1200 case as both products feature a mesh front, blue LED fans, painted interior, and comparable side panel window design. Its worth noting that CyberPower removed the 230mm fan, normally located on the side panel, in order to house the super-sized Cooler Master V8 heatsink.   



 Gamer Extreme 3000 Design
 A Closer Look

 


Front
 

 


Rear
 

 


Top
 

 


Bottom
 

After powering on the system, it became obvious that aiflow is a  strong suit of this setup. The Solano features two 140mm blue LED fans in the front, a gigantic 230mm LED fan on top, a 140mm fan on the bottom, and one 120mm fan on the rear panel. Also on the rear panel, we find a fan speed controller for the Cooler Master V8 and a pair of watercooling cutouts. We'll touch on the V8 on the next page, but we were impressed with the excellent airflow combined with the relatively quiet operation the system provides.


CyberPower makes use of two drive bays by providing a Samsung 22x DVD burner and multi-functional card reader. The DVD drive operated quietly throughout testing and performed as expected. Moreover, we like the idea of the included 12-in-1 media card reader as it gives the added feature of transferring external media without the need for an adapter.


The front panel ports and buttons are conveniently located on the top edge of the Solano 1000 enclosure. From left to right, there is a reset button, eSATA port, USB, microphone jack, headset jack, two more USB ports, and a large power on/off button. All connections proved to be fully functional and user friendly during testing. 

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System is pretty legit.  With that amount of airflow, I'd expect this type of system is pretty reliable and would last a long time.  Or you could overclock... I'll write that article, just send it along hothardware...

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Why is it whenever I see a CyberPower review, I try to price it up to see if the review price matches what I can do at the Cyberpower site and it doesn't.

http://www.cyberpowerpc.com/system/Gamer_Xtreme_3000/detail

  • *BASE_PRICE: [+979]
  • BUNDLE: None
  • BLUETOOTH: None
  • CD: LG 22X DVD±R/±RW + CD-R/RW Dual Layer Drive (BLACK COLOR)
  • CD2: NONE
  • CAS: AZZA Solano 1000 Full-Tower Advance Cooling Case w/ Dual 230mm Fan + Extra 3 Fans [+28]
  • CASUPGRADE: NONE
  • CS_FAN: Default case fans
  • CPU: Intel® Core™ i7-860 2.80 GHz 8M L2 Cache LGA1156
  • CARE: Professional Wiring for All WIRING Inside The System Chassis - Minimize Cable Exposure, Maximize Airflow in Your System [+19] ( It sure looks like Pro wiring in the review....
  • FREEBIE_OS: None
  • FLOPPY: NONE
  • FAN: CoolerMaster V8 Gaming CPU Cooling Fan (Extreme Silent Operation at only 22dBA + Overclock Proof) [+58]
  • FREEBIE_RM: None
  • FA_HDD: None
  • FLASHMEDIA: INTERNAL 12in1 Flash Media Reader/Writer [+10] (BLACK COLOR)
  • HDD: Single Hard Drive (1.5TB (1.5TBx1) SATA-II 3.0Gb/s 32MB Cache 7200RPM HDD [+56])
  • HDD2: NONE
  • IEEE_CARD: NONE
  • KEYBOARD: Xtreme Gear (Black Color) Multimedia/Internet USB Keyboard
  • MOUSE: XtremeGear Optical USB 3 Buttons Gaming Mouse
  • MODEM: NONE
  • MULTIVIEW: Non-SLI/Non-CrossFireX Mode Supports Multiple Monitors
  • MONITOR: NONE
  • MONITOR2: NONE
  • MOTHERBOARD: [CrossFireX/SLI] Asus P7P55D Deluxe Intel P55 Chipset DDR3 ATX Mainboard w/ 7.1 HD Audio, GbLAN, USB2.0, SATA-II RAID, 3 Gen2 PCIe, 2 PCIe X1 & 2 PCI [+115]
  • MEMORY: 4GB (2GBx2) DDR3/1600MHz Dual Channel Memory Module [+27] (Kingston HyperX (All Venom OC Levels Certified) [+15])
  • NETWORK: Onboard Gigabit LAN Network
  • OVERCLOCK: No Overclocking
  • OS: Microsoft® Windows Vista™ Home Premium w/ Service Pack 1 (64-bit Edition)
  • OS_UPGRADE: None
  • POWERSUPPLY: Corsair Power Supplies [+58] (($20 off Mail-in Rebate) 650 Watts CMPSU-650TX - Quad SLI Ready)
  • PRINTER: None
  • PRINTER_CABLE: None
  • RUSH: NO; READY TO SHIP IN 5~10 BUSINESS DAYS
  • SERVICE: STANDARD WARRANTY: 3-YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY PLUS LIFE-TIME TECHNICAL SUPPORT
  • SOUND: HIGH DEFINITION ON-BOARD 7.1 AUDIO
  • SPEAKERS: None
  • TEMP: NONE
  • TVRC: None
  • USB: Built-in USB 2.0 Ports
  • USBHD: NONE
  • VIDEOCAMERA: NONE
  • VIDEO: NVIDIA GeForce GTX295 1.7GB 16X PCIe Video Card [+357] (EVGA Powered by NVIDIA [+5])
  • VIDEO2: None
  • VIDEO3: None
  • VC_GAMES: None
  • WNC: NONE
  • _PRICE: (+1727)

That give me a price of $1727, not really close to $1599. Did I do something wrong? I can't seem to get the right price...

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Great review... I'm surprised to see that a $1600 system can stand toe to toe with the 3k systems. Kudos to the new Intel Lynnfield.. some kick ass processors.

@Pacojoe, You must've done something wrong because I get $1609... And I got a coupon code in my email for 5% off that makes this one hell of a deal.

 

  • *BASE_PRICE: [+1545]
  • BUNDLE: None
  • BLUETOOTH: None
  • CD: LG 22X DVD±R/±RW + CD-R/RW Dual Layer Drive (BLACK COLOR)
  • CD2: NONE
  • CAS: AZZA Solano 1000 Full-Tower Advance Cooling Case w/ Dual 230mm Fan + Extra 3 Fans
  • CASUPGRADE: NONE
  • CS_FAN: Default case fans
  • CPU: Intel® Core™ i7-860 2.80 GHz 8M L2 Cache LGA1156
  • FAN: CoolerMaster V8 Gaming CPU Cooling Fan (Extreme Silent Operation at only 22dBA + Overclock Proof)
  • FREEBIE_RM: None
  • FA_HDD: None
  • FLASHMEDIA: None
  • FLOPPY: NONE
  • FREEBIE_OS: None
  • HDD: Single Hard Drive (1.5TB (1.5TBx1) SATA-II 3.0Gb/s 32MB Cache 7200RPM HDD)
  • HDD2: NONE
  • IEEE_CARD: NONE
  • KEYBOARD: Xtreme Gear (Black Color) Multimedia/Internet USB Keyboard
  • MOUSE: XtremeGear Optical USB 3 Buttons Gaming Mouse
  • MODEM: NONE
  • MULTIVIEW: Non-SLI/Non-CrossFireX Mode Supports Multiple Monitors
  • MONITOR: NONE
  • MONITOR2: NONE
  • MOTHERBOARD: [CrossFireX/SLI] Asus P7P55D Deluxe Intel P55 Chipset DDR3 ATX Mainboard w/ 7.1 HD Audio, GbLAN, USB2.0, SATA-II RAID, 3 Gen2 PCIe, 2 PCIe X1 & 2 PCI [+65]
  • MEMORY: 4GB (2GBx2) DDR3/1600MHz Dual Channel Memory Module (Kingston HyperX (All Venom OC Levels Certified) [+15])
  • NETWORK: Onboard Gigabit LAN Network
  • OVERCLOCK: No Overclocking
  • OS: Microsoft® Windows Vista™ Home Premium w/ Service Pack 1 (64-bit Edition)
  • OS_UPGRADE: None
  • POWERSUPPLY: Corsair Power Supplies [-16] (($20 off Mail-in Rebate) 650 Watts CMPSU-650TX - Quad SLI Ready)
  • PRINTER: None
  • PRINTER_CABLE: None
  • RUSH: NO; READY TO SHIP IN 5~10 BUSINESS DAYS
  • SOFT: Free 60 Days Microsoft® Office® 2007 (Words, Excel, Access, Power Point, Outlook + More) - Windows Vista™ Required
  • SERVICE: STANDARD WARRANTY: 3-YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY PLUS LIFE-TIME TECHNICAL SUPPORT
  • SOUND: HIGH DEFINITION ON-BOARD 7.1 AUDIO
  • SPEAKERS: None
  • TEMP: NONE
  • TVRC: None
  • USB: Built-in USB 2.0 Ports
  • USBHD: NONE
  • VIDEOCAMERA: NONE
  • VIDEO: NVIDIA GeForce GTX295 1.7GB 16X PCIe Video Card (Major Brand Powered by NVIDIA)
  • VIDEO2: None
  • VIDEO3: None
  • VC_GAMES: None
  • WNC: NONE
  • _PRICE: (+1609)
  • _view_: detail

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what do you guys feel is a fair profit margin on a system build like this considering the warranty service provided and labor?

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@bugzrrad: That's on my mind a lot. I'm envisioning a new system, and building it myself, but as it'd be my first I'm still a little hesitant, and would go with a system builder-- paying a slight premium for the parts and installation-- if they could give me what I want.

Problem is, I'm a little too picky. I have some pretty specific ideas about CPU coolers and fans, cases and graphics cards, etc., etc.; and none can get it exactly as I want it. I often price up a "close enough" system at either CyberPowerPC.com or IBuyPower.com, just for fun.

It appears that they factor the cost of building into the parts. For example, plugging in a Radeon 5870 will cost you $409; doing it yourself, ten bucks less. I'm sure they get quantity discounts on a lot of items, though, and perhaps buy right from the manufacturer, cutting their costs further; but then, that's irrelevant as you can't get that same price point.

It adds up, but it's a good compromise between getting a consumer PC and building it yourself (and potentially frying a CPU in the process).

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I always think that when a system has a company stand behind the product makes it worth the extra ching!

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It sure does have good specs. I, so far, prefer to build my own systems though.

Besides the price difference, there is a lot of satisfaction to being able to say that "I built it".

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Last year I bought a cyberpower pc directly from the company.   The pc arrived late and wouldn't start.   There was no way to call the company and talk to a person.   You had to call and leave your name and number and wait for them to respond.   It took five days for them to respond.   In the meantime, I opened the case and found the hard drives weren't plugged in.   After pluggin in the hard drives, the pc started but all I got was a blue screen of death because the BIOS had been configured incorrectly.   Finally past the BIOS problem, I found the sound and video cards weren't fully installed so I fixed that problem.  Then I found that no video or sound drivers had been installed.   The pc finally worked... for two days.   The motherboard failed.    I decided to return the pc but the company wouldn't return my phone calls so I contacted BBB.   BBB got a person from Cyberpower to call me and I got permission to return the pc as I'd only had it for 10 days.  Then I waited and waited for my money back.   BBB and I both put pressure on the company to return my money but it took my credit card company's pressure before that happened.... a month after they received the pc.   Check this company's BBB score before you buy and be very careful if it's below an A level.  

 

 

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