Asus Crosshair IV Extreme AMD 890FX Motherboard - HotHardware

Asus Crosshair IV Extreme AMD 890FX Motherboard

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Our two AMD test systems were configured identically save for the necessary difference in RAM type and speed due to their differing chipsets. Both systems were equipped with 6GB of RAM. The M3A78-T board used DDR2-800—this 780GX-based board has never been fond of DDR2-1066. The Crosshair IV Extreme used Corsair DDR3 rated for 1600MHz but we purposefully backed down to 1333MHz which is the highest, officially supported speed of the 890FX chipset.
 HotHardware's Test Systems
 Authentic AMD

Motherboards:
Asus M3A78-T
BIOS 1907 (10/22/2010)
AMD 780GX Chipset

Asus Crosshair IV Extreme
BIOS 0502 (11/19/2010)
AMD 890FX Chipset

Processor:
AMD Phenom II X6 1100T
(3.3GHz - 3.7GHz (Turbo Core))

RAM:

Corsair DDR2-800

RAM:
Corsair DDR3-1600@1333MHz
DDR3-1600 (8-8-8-24)

Graphics Card:
Nvidia GTX 480 (x2)

Hard Drive:
Corsair F120 SDD
WD Caviar Black 1TB

Software:
Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
Nvidia Forceware 260.99

Note:  We used one GeForce GTX 480 in each system, save when testing Lucid Logix support.

SiSoft Sandra 2010 SP1
Synthetic Benchmark Performance

We began testing with SiSoftware's SANDRA, which stands for System ANalyzer, Diagnostic and Reporting Assistant. We examine a CPU's multimedia and arithmetic performance using Sandra, as well as the motherboard's peak memory bandwidth. The difference between the two platforms should be minor given their identical configurations.





Sandra shows precious little difference between the two motherboards. The one exception is the memory test, where the Crosshair IV Extreme has an obvious advantage.

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The Extreme is not worth it over the Crosshair IV. I have yet to see Lucid's crappy gimmick work, and I thought that since a page was dedicated to it, that it would have been tested on the a few of the games that it supports.

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Those are some impressive gains from swapping the motherboard.

I would like to have seen a comparison of an entry level board of the same chipset to this board, so we can get more of an apples to apples comparrison and see if the more expensive board is justified in the numbers.

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I'm with Sammy, though maybe not quite as harsh. Lucid still has a ways to go to get their drivers worked out, but their tech does actually work. The only problem is that it would work better on cheaper boards since those are the people most likely to need/use it.

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InfinityzeN1:
Lucid still has a ways to go to get their drivers worked out, but their tech does actually work. The only problem is that it would work better on cheaper boards since those are the people most likely to need/use it.

This. Anyone going out to buy a high end motherboard is going to have the money to put in exactly the graphics they want. Lucid would much better serve the low end were you can just pop in whatever is in your budget and add to the performance you already have.

 

In general I don't really see the market for this board. Don't get me wrong it is a killer board, but at the price it costs almost $100 more than any AMD CPU.

Also where are the killer EFI bios that some of the Asus boards are getting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-J4o3sqhB4

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This board is definitely for the high end overclocking crowd and priced accordingly.

If I had to consider building a custom rig for someone that insisted on an AMD with the best Asus mobo available  & * has 'da $$

bob_on_the_cob:

... Anyone going out to buy a high end motherboard is going to have the money to put in exactly the graphics they want. Lucid would much better serve the low end were you can just pop in whatever is in your budget and add to the performance you already have.

the Crosshair IV Extreme would be a contender for other reasons like >>save on an audio card and the one -inch bigger ATX size would definitely get them into a better higher end case and would likely to get pretty particular in selecting ram and cooler options.

not likely for me at this time  but good to consider all the same

thanks for the detailed review and insights

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Whoa!!! whats new with this motherboard?? my dream computer was to have the Asus Rampage III. I have to read up on this.

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Sammy,

Did you miss the list of titles we confirmed are functional?

The problem with trying to publish some "representative" Lucid benchmarks is that each test is more-or-less unique. There are some tests that scale by 5-10%, some that scale by 20-50%, some at 75%, some at 90%. It proved impossible to grab a select handful and claim they were a solid sample of what to expect.

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Ahh, I see, I guess I skipped a few paragraphs...I confused the " LucidLogix Hydra Officially Tested Titles" part as if it was submitted by lucid and not yourself.

As InfinityZ and Bob have stated, this would be more practical on a lower end board, but the problem is that adding that chip would lead to a higher price tag.

I remember reading( I think) that this will be a software solution in the Sandy Bridge environment.....Still I just don't think this is worth it...Just stick to Nvidia for Nvidia Solutions and Amd for Amd solutions.

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Sammy,

 

You're confusing Virtu (software-only, allows for Sandy Bridge-powered video transcoding) with Hydra (hardware-implemented multi-GPU processor).

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Ahh, I see Again...thanks..

In Total coincidence, There are reports on Virtu and the Z68 chipset now showing up on some websites. I look forward to reading it also on HH...I will be reading carefully to make sense in any judgment. I imagine you or Dave are working on it right now?

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