Sprint Keeps It Simple With $60 Unlimited Wireless Plan For New And Existing Customers

Sprint chief Marcelo Claure promised to roll up his sleeves and come out swinging this week with "very disruptive" pricing plans that would shock and awe the wireless industry, and we now know what those are. Following the introduction of newly priced shared family plans earlier this week, Sprint today announced the Sprint $60 Unlimited Plan with no contract required.

Short and simple, this gives Sprint subscribers unlimited talk, text, and data for $60 per month, which is $20 less than T-Mobile's $80 per month unlimited plan. That works out to a savings of $480 over two years against T-Mobile, the wireless carrier points out. Compared to T-Mobile's promotional pricing, Sprint customers still stand to save $120 over two years, and without the hassle of trying to recruit friends to sign up.

Another upside is that the new plan is available to both new and existing subscribers, the latter of which are typically left out of enticing deals.

Sprint Store
Image Source: Flickr (Mike Mozart)

"People know Sprint for Unlimited," said Marcelo Claure, Sprint CEO. "We have long been the leader in offering customers unlimited data and that leadership continues today with our new $60 unlimited plan. Unlimited talk, text and data for $60 is the best unlimited postpaid plan available. And, we’ve listened to our loyal customers; we’re making the Sprint $60 Unlimited Plan available to both new and existing customers."

So, what's the caveat? For one, Claure will be the first to admit that Sprint's network isn't on par with the competition, hence why the company is prioritizing lower price plans. Secondly, the absence of a contract also means there's no subsidized pricing on new phones. You can either bring your own compatible handset, or purchase one outright from Sprint. To make things easier, you can use Sprint's Easy Pay service, which gives eligible customers the option of paying for devices over the course of 24 months, with a variable down payment.
Via:  Sprint

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