Sony Seriously Damaged By PSN Hack, Private Data Compromised - HotHardware
Sony Seriously Damaged By PSN Hack, Private Data Compromised

Sony Seriously Damaged By PSN Hack, Private Data Compromised

The Internet has been grumbling over Sony's unexpected PlayStation Network shutdown for the past few days, but new information from the company will put the outrage into overdrive. According to Sony's official statement:
we believe that an unauthorized person has obtained the following information that you provided: name, address (city, state, zip), country, email address, birthdate, PlayStation Network/Qriocity password and login, and handle/PSN online ID. It is also possible that your profile data, including purchase history and billing address (city, state, zip), and your PlayStation Network/Qriocity password security answers may have been obtained. If you have authorized a sub-account for your dependent, the same data with respect to your dependent may have been obtained. While there is no evidence at this time that credit card data was taken, we cannot rule out the possibility. If you have provided your credit card data through PlayStation Network or Qriocity, out of an abundance of caution we are advising you that your credit card number (excluding security code) and expiration date may have been obtained.
That's about as bad as it gets. We'd actually go a step farther and recommend users cancel existing credit cards and order new ones. While this is always an annoying hassle, it's even more frustrating when one is forced to do it minus the $900 someone already stole. Credit card companies and banks make good on such transactions the majority of the time, but it often takes 5-10 days for them to do so. Meanwhile, you're still out the cash.


The PSN Network (Artist's Interpretation)
Sony's wording implies that it doesn't know if the entire network was affected (current estimates are that the PSN has some 77 million subscribers.) The delay had already drawn criticism from certain corners; Senator Richard Blumenthal fired off a letter to Sony USA declaring himself to be "troubled" by the company's slowness.

Security expert Bruce Schneier offered one of the best summaries of the situation ever. "This happens a lot, and there's nothing you can do about it," Schneier said. "You might be screwed, but you'll basically be OK." Indeed. Unless it turns out that millions of credit cards or other personally identifiable information was stole as well, Sony will pull out of this reasonably well. Sony intends to begin restoring some PSN / Qriocity services by next week. We can't wait to find out whose behind this, and whether or not the attack was driven by ideological differences or was simply a group of hackers taking advantage of a flaw. Anonymous has stated "For once, we didn't do it," which leaves us wondering--"Who did?"
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Eh, I still love my PS3. I never bought any thing from PSN, nore do a really use it much. After all what the main difference between someone stealing your "Address, birth date, ect'? companies sell it to one another all the time...

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good thing i never bought anything from the PSN store and gave a fake name and address so they only have my email eat that hackers!

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I have never given a console my information for some reason I just don't trust it. How slow they are to admit what has been stolen is completely ridiculous.

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It's likely to take few days to craft the important media and marketing spin with a possible apology for the inconvience & blah blah blah about the ongoing efforts to prevent this in the future blah .with no recourse & apossibly a huge pita for some .results [you]= 0 results Sony = business as usual

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Network security is one of the most important issues for any business and Sony should have known better. Just think if EMC or even Amazon had the security of the PSN, it may have been even worse.

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they picked on geohot and got every hacker against them. it was completely their fault, huge oversight.

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jonation:
they picked on geohot and got every hacker against them. it was completely their fault

They sought to exert undue control over a product that they sold to millions of people. They act as if those machines still belong to them and not the consumers. This is flawed thinking, no matter what your lawyer tells you, because people don't think that way. We bought it, and it's ours,........not yours.

Then, they 'reach-out' with an "update" and cripple certain functions that were enabled all along. After that swift move pisses off a multitude of customer base, and somebody 'fixes' their fix, they go after that guy and harass him mercilessly, even though their PS-3's system security was laughingly easy to *forever* crack!

So they used their deep pockets and endless stream of lawyers to try and make an 'example' out of the guy and then 'settled' with him when they realized that they weren't gonna get to nail him as bad as they wanted to.

So at this point, the real hackers out there felt that they were being prodded enough, and Sony finally woke the equivalent of a "Digital Hornet's Nest" with their heavy handedness.

They were attacked by still unknown individuals.

Sony started out telling the world that "these attacks are boring",...and my personal favorite...."they don't amount to much either". But now, after far too long (10 days between the security breach and their notifications to their "valued" customers) for people to take the proper steps to protect themselves, Sony discloses the fact that all of their security is laughingly juvenile and ineffective at best. They've lost our personal data to the 'digital wilderness' and aren't even sure just what was lost. Why did it take 10 full days for them to warn people? In 10 days, your personal information could have been disseminated throughout the world a multitude of times. How dare they refer to their customers as "Valued" in their tardy announcements?

Add all of this to the 'Sony RootKit Virus' on all of their music CD's debacle years ago, and one wonders why anybody does any business with them at all?

I don't.

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realneil:

...and one wonders why anybody does any business with them at all?

I don't.

great comments I don't buy into their stuff either that 'rootkit' nonsense cause some folks a major pita 

was checking out some Hendrix trks in the Chillin vid thread > Sony burns it

& for the short time they were up they did sound better.

too bad for no more 'torts' for the companies that really deserve their just deserts..

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realneil has summed up everything about what I think in a long sentence. Let's face it, Sony (while they're able to do some sweet ass ***) is a horrible company in reality. They have no idea how to take anything seriously nor do they care about the consumers. They've placed rootkits on Music CD's, they took away an essential function of the PS3 (Other OS) and now they're paying the price by having the PSN's personal info stolen from under them.

If anything they should of been working on beefing up the network security to the PSN rather then focusing on geohot and the possible millions they could get from him, I mean is it worth thousands of customers just to go after one guy, is it worth it to neglect everything else? And they wonder why Sony never gets a break from anything.

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I'm just glad I never used my credit card on the PSN. Although it would be nice to be able to log on and change our passwords. Even though at this point all that will do is keep the hackers from messing with your account. They may have my email address, but a lot of places have my email address.

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I'm sure they've been meaning to hire more people to do network security. It's one of those things that's not funded well enough and then something like this happens.

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Yikes, I'm with the rest of you guys I never gave them my credit card info. I still like my ps3, it's not going anywhere; but seriously step it up sony! I feel bad for the tons of people who did buy stuff from the psn.

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Moral of the story: Don't mess with Geohot

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On another note, I wonder if the hackers can tell me my password for my PSN. I haven't used it since I set the thing up back in 06...lol

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Der Meister:
I wonder if the hackers can tell me my password for my PSN.

Ha-Ha!

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I have purchased from the PSN network. Gonna cancel my cards tomorow to be safe, and probably should have done so yesterday. Who knows how many people that info will reach

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Finally got me e-mail from them today admitting to the breach how ridiculous. See below.

PlayStation(R)Network

===================================

Valued PlayStation(R)Network/Qriocity Customer:

We have discovered that between April 17 and April 19, 2011,

certain PlayStation Network and Qriocity service user account

information was compromised in connection with an illegal and

unauthorized intrusion into our network. In response to this

intrusion, we have:

1) Temporarily turned off PlayStation Network and Qriocity services;

2) Engaged an outside, recognized security firm to conduct a full

and complete investigation into what happened; and

3) Quickly taken steps to enhance security and strengthen our

network infrastructure by rebuilding our system to provide you

with greater protection of your personal information.

We greatly appreciate your patience, understanding and goodwill

as we do whatever it takes to resolve these issues as quickly and

efficiently as practicable.

Although we are still investigating the details of this incident,

we believe that an unauthorized person has obtained the following

information that you provided: name, address (city, state, zip), country,

email address, birthdate, PlayStation Network/Qriocity password and login,

and handle/PSN online ID. It is also possible that your profile data,

including purchase history and billing address (city, state, zip),

and your PlayStation Network/Qriocity password security answers may

have been obtained. If you have authorized a sub-account for your

dependent, the same data with respect to your dependent may have

been obtained. While there is no evidence at this time that credit

card data was taken, we cannot rule out the possibility. If you have

provided your credit card data through PlayStation Network or Qriocity,

out of an abundance of caution we are advising you that your credit

card number (excluding security code) and expiration date may have

been obtained.

For your security, we encourage you to be especially aware of email,

telephone and postal mail scams that ask for personal or sensitive

information. Sony will not contact you in any way, including by email,

asking for your credit card number, social security number or other

personally identifiable information. If you are asked for this information,

you can be confident Sony is not the entity asking. When the PlayStation

Network and Qriocity services are fully restored, we strongly recommend that

you log on and change your password. Additionally, if you use your PlayStation

Network or Qriocity user name or password for other unrelated services or

accounts, we strongly recommend that you change them as well.

To protect against possible identity theft or other financial loss, we

encourage you to remain vigilant, to review your account statements and

to monitor your credit reports. We are providing the following information

for those who wish to consider it:

- U.S. residents are entitled under U.S. law to one free credit report annually

from each of the three major credit bureaus. To order your free credit report,

visit www.annualcreditreport.com or call toll-free (877) 322-8228.

- We have also provided names and contact information for the three major U.S.

credit bureaus below. At no charge, U.S. residents can have these credit bureaus

place a "fraud alert" on your file that alerts creditors to take additional steps

to verify your identity prior to granting credit in your name. This service can

make it more difficult for someone to get credit in your name. Note, however,

that because it tells creditors to follow certain procedures to protect you,

it also may delay your ability to obtain credit while the agency verifies your

identity. As soon as one credit bureau confirms your fraud alert, the others

are notified to place fraud alerts on your file. Should you wish to place a

fraud alert, or should you have any questions regarding your credit report,

please contact any one of the agencies listed below:

Experian: 888-397-3742; www.experian.com; P.O. Box 9532, Allen, TX 75013

Equifax: 800-525-6285; www.equifax.com; P.O. Box 740241, Atlanta, GA 30374-0241

TransUnion: 800-680-7289; www.transunion.com; Fraud Victim Assistance Division,

P.O. Box 6790, Fullerton, CA 92834-6790

- You may wish to visit the website of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission at

www.consumer.gov/idtheft or reach the FTC at 1-877-382-4357 or 600 Pennsylvania

Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20580 for further information about how to protect

yourself from identity theft. Your state Attorney General may also have advice

on preventing identity theft, and you should report instances of known or

suspected identity theft to law enforcement, your State Attorney General,

and the FTC. For North Carolina residents, the Attorney General can be

contacted at 9001 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-9001; telephone

(877) 566-7226; or www.ncdoj.gov. For Maryland residents, the Attorney

General can be contacted at 200 St. Paul Place, 16th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21202;

telephone: (888) 743-0023; or www.oag.state.md.us.

We thank you for your patience as we complete our investigation of this

incident, and we regret any inconvenience. Our teams are working around the

clock on this, and services will be restored as soon as possible. Sony takes

information protection very seriously and will continue to work to ensure that

additional measures are taken to protect personally identifiable information.

Providing quality and secure entertainment services to our customers is

our utmost priority. Please contact us at 1-800-345-7669 should you have any

additional questions.

Sincerely,

Sony Computer Entertainment and Sony Network Entertainment

So they still have no idea what data has been stolen

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Sorry that last post being so long I just figured for those of you who don't have a PSN account you might want to read Sony's response. They should set their database somehow when it comes back up to force a password change I also think they need to be offering a credit monitoring service to everyone for free for the next year due to their lack of security.

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All in all I think they handled it well. I will be happy once the PSN is back up

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Sony confirms that the first thing users will need to do once the PSN finally does goes back online is download a new system firmware update which will require everyone to change their PSN passwords no matter what.

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omegadraco:

Sony confirms that the first thing users will need to do once the PSN finally does goes back online is download a new system firmware update which will require everyone to change their PSN passwords no matter what.

I'm guessing that's somewhat of a bad idea. What if the hacker logs into the account first and changes the password when the PSN comes online? If Sony doesn't allow users to change their email addresses, this should work. At least Sony should reset the passwords of every account and send an email containing the reset password that can be changed later.

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TaylorKarras:
I'm guessing that's somewhat of a bad idea.

Yeah, how can they see anything with their heads so far up into where the Sun never shines? As 3vi1 already said so eloquently, their security practices are AFU to the bone.

Here is a little more reading,......

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Yeah I got that email today about Everquest and Vanguard accounts I had with Sony. The positive is I know my car number and access codes have been changed twice since anything attached to the accounts were valid and active. my address has also changed they did not have my birth date or SS# either. So I don't really care as there is nothing other than my first name and last name without my middle name or initial. Therefore the only thing anyone could do is say they were a person with a name similar to mine and no valid address.

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