Say Goodbye To The Landline: AT&T And Verizon Want To Cut The POTS Cord - HotHardware
Say Goodbye To The Landline: AT&T And Verizon Want To Cut The POTS Cord

Say Goodbye To The Landline: AT&T And Verizon Want To Cut The POTS Cord

Two of the biggest telecoms in the U.S. -- AT&T and Verizon Communications -- are on a mission to make landlines nothing more than a footnote in the history of telecommunication. One state at a time, the two companies are lobbying for permission to replace POTS -- the copper-wired landline phone system -- with Internet-based systems that use the same wired and wireless broadband networks that we use for cable programming and accessing the web.

According to The Wall Street Journal, Michigan last week became the latest state of more than 30 to have passed or consider passing laws that eliminate "carrier of last resort" mandates, meaning U.S. citizens in such states would no longer be guaranteed access to local-exchange landline telephone service.

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Image Source: Flickr (tompagenet)

For many Americans, they've already ditched traditional landlines, even if they don't realize it. In many instances where a customer bundles Internet, TV, and telephone service through a cable operator, telephone calls are actually being made over an IP network and not twisted copper lines. In that sense, this represents a shift in how calls are made versus truly giving home phones. However, it's important to note that there's no government mandate guaranteeing Internet access, so it's conceivable that certain areas could be without telephone service if POTS are abandoned or removed.

On the flip side, many people have ditched their home phones in favor of mobile phones, anyway. Citing CDC statistics, WSJ says over 38 percent of adults and 45.5 percent of children living in households without a landline telephone. Two in every five U.S. homes are wireless, while just 8.5 percent of households rely on just a landline.
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How are they dealing with emergency situations..I don't see that going well.

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VOIP modems are equipped with batteries, so you can still reach out in case of emergency.

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Lets see how this turns out, although I have been wanting to do it, I still have both.

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well ill wonder what will happen is this only in the states or also in canada?

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I don't think we even use our Landline anymore. Now replacing existing lines with internet interests me. Depending on how fast the internet would be. But would be great way to get internet to those who can't have anything but dial-up.

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The batteries in your VOIP system does not solve the downed lines any more or less. And mine does not have a battery back up I was told to buy an APS. and the worst internet providers want to dump copper?? it just sounds bad until they show they can make it work.

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GOOD Bye Landline ._.

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So is this a good or bad thing cause I'm curious to lnpw

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They wanna replace it with cheap 4g lte put antennas on your roof they make billions but way to cheap to upgrade to fiber

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Just because they want to move phone service to VOIP does not mean you'll have Internet access. They are separate systems in the telco world. This could be very bad for emergency services. Sometimes the old tried and true solutions are still the best. I work in a hospital and we have tons of POTS lines for emergency and down time procedures because when all else fails copper just works.

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no battery in our Voip system either (Time Warner) - we needed to keep the landline for our security system (which has a battery backup and radio system if the line goes out so not worried)

Cell phones still work when the power goes out - and the police station is like 1/8 mile from my house :)

 

 

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For home use, yes this usually isn't an issue, but in a mass casualty event or natural disaster communications like cell towers can be overwhelmed quickly and stop working. Last year's Boston marathon bombing is a perfect example. Battery backups do nothing if the "line" doesn't go threw to the rest of the network.

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As someone who had a landline through 9/11, the blackout of 03, several hurricanes and superstorms and never once lost phone service. yet my neighbors have all lost phone service during each disaster. While i object to what they charge the alternatives are terrible. I still recommend a few POTS lines be added for every PBX system I setup, this way there is some service when circuits go down and they will. 

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digitaldd:

As someone who had a landline through 9/11, the blackout of 03, several hurricanes and superstorms and never once lost phone service. yet my neighbors have all lost phone service during each disaster. While i object to what they charge the alternatives are terrible. I still recommend a few POTS lines be added for every PBX system I setup, this way there is some service when circuits go down and they will. 

yep, in some cases the VoiP can work better... around me, about 95% of the cable lines are buried... where as about 10% of the phone lines are. Phone used to go out all the time for us... not anymore

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I have been cellular with a VOIP through Vonage for many years to tell you the truth. What I don't understand is why AT&T who I have worked for does not just replace it all with Fiber they own the real estate for it, the have the transmission boxes to facilitate it and think about the backbone your network would have country wide. They could literally kill Comcast and I think there the only ones who could really challenge them anymore at all. Even Verizon is a comcast partner.

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Ruh-Roh! I live in a dead zone with no other phone service option except to yell really loudly. If I fall in the woods, will anyone hear?

I don't believe they will truly ever be able to have VOIP available to everyone in the near future. Too many people live in rural areas with dead zones and no chance of getting cable to these areas because it isn't cost effective as I've been told by the cable guy, who I have begged many a time for cable access.

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yeah i agree, my dad used to be "outside" of the cable area... and would have to pay $10K to have the cable run to his house... he had one of those satellite dishes (the old kind that you had to tune to the different satellites!) - was a long t ime ago. Finally got to his area but im sure there are millions of people that are still in this situation

 

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