Samsung To Offer 1 Gigabit XDR DRAM - HotHardware
Samsung To Offer 1 Gigabit XDR DRAM

Samsung To Offer 1 Gigabit XDR DRAM

According to Rambus, Samsung Electronics plans to offer a 1 Gigabit XDR DRAM memory device. As a result of this development, Rambus' technology may finally start to see more widespread availability. The XDR memory architecture is interesting because it achieves performance that is higher than would be attainable by current mainstream memory modules.

"Samsung's market leadership means system manufacturers can be assured of a reliable supply of our XDR DRAM," said Sharon Holt, senior vice president of Licensing and Marketing at Rambus. "With XDR memory's world-leading bandwidth performance, designers can meet their system requirements with fewer devices and greater power efficiency."



Rambus' memory offers excellent bandwidth and operates on less power while still meeting the demands of gaming, computing and consumer electronics applications. So far, only a 1Gb XDR DRAM module has been announced. However, it's possible Samsung could consider manufacturing other models as well.


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can't wait to see some products and some numbers!

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I'm not sure this is really great news. I hate to see Rambus profit after the garbage they pulled with JEDEC (getting their patented tech included in the standard).

Of course, I hold grudges longer than the average elephant.

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I'm hard-pressed to think of a way in which this could actually come to market in a mainstream-sorta way. It's been ten years since Intel tried to cajole/push/coerce the Dramurai into manufacturing RDRAM and turning it into the next-generation solution for the P4 and then-future products.

Who comes out the bad guy and who the good guy depends entirely on who you believe, but there were legitimate technological and economic factors that made it difficult for RDRAM to find its footing. Some of these may have been addressed in the time since then, but manufacturing XDR instead of DDR3 would presumably still require new equipment, different module testing hardware, new chipsets, new integrated memory controllers, etc, etc.

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Agreed, there is too much inertia behind current standards. Intel learned this with RDRAM and likely wouldn't go down that path again. And if Intel isn't going there, frankly rest of the market will only go there in niche areas at best.

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>> Who comes out the bad guy and who the good guy depends entirely on who you believe

True. But, no "standard" should be encumbered by patents, much less "designed to only work if using patented technology". My impression, from what I know (though I do *not* claim to know it all), is that Rambus acted in bad faith and that they should therefore be ostracized.... that their patents should be avoided and leapfrogged.

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The reason that their technology didn't take off years ago is because they wanted way too much for licencing fees. The gouge was on and Taiwan wasn't playing that tune. So they went down another path and we ended up with DDR and so on. Their own greed kept them from being a big player in the marketplace. Rambus RAM was faster and very reliable but it was frighteningly expensive to buy. I just worked on a system with that stuff in it and it's so old it's 'growing hair' on it. But it still works well.

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Hi.

Hey its really good, Thanks for sharing this update with us.

 

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lol... oh boy... We always seem to get an abundance of these kind of comments when the contests roll around lol

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Yes we do, there's always spam and bump post, there's a complaint thread in feed backs xD

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Oh yeah Realneil Rambus was a total bugger . The component ram was actually really good especially compared to the current EDO of the time. There was just several hoops to jump through and the price was exorbitant.

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