Samsung Begins Mass Production Of 3D TV Panels

Samsung Begins Mass Production Of 3D TV Panels

DLP-based 3D HDTVs have been around for years now, but those weren't these fancy new advanced sets that were showcased at the Consumer Electronics Show. Now, Samsung is claiming to be the first to mass product 3D TV panels, ones that use "3D Active Glasses" technology.

The move marks a bold new step in the march towards making 3D a household mainstay, and it shows that even TV makers are on the bandwagon. The company began producing LED and LCD compatible panels for 40-inch, 46-inch and 55-inch full-HD 3D TVs using ‘3D Active Glasses’ this month, employing Samsung’s exclusive true 240Hz technology. The displays are able to showcase 3D and 2D content in Full HD, and the company has reduced the response time of its LCD and LED panels by 20 percent to less than four milliseconds, eliminating any interference between left and right eye images.

There's no exact plan for release (at least not yet), but we'd guess that some of these sets will be on the market as early as this year.


“Recently, 3D displays have captured the industry spotlight,” said Wonkie Chang, president of the LCD Business at Samsung Electronics. “Samsung Electronics aims to lead the global 3D TV panel market in pioneering panel mass production for 3D LED and LCD TVs.”

The company began producing LED and LCD compatible panels for 40-inch, 46-inch and 55-inch full-HD 3D TVs using ‘3D Active Glasses’ this month, employing Samsung’s exclusive true 240Hz technology.

Samsung’s true 240Hz technology delivers full-HD viewing in 2D, and also smooth, natural, full-HD 3D images that can vividly capture rapid movements.

By incorporating true 240Hz technology, operating at 240 frames per second, Samsung’s panels deliver a more lifelike picture with alternating left and right eye images through the use of 3D Active Glasses technology.

Samsung has reduced the response time of its LCD and LED panels by 20 percent to less than four milliseconds, eliminating any interference between left and right eye images. With this improved response time, Samsung is able to achieve natural 3D images and also deliver 2D pictures capturing rapid movement with exceptional clarity.

Samsung’s new 3D Active Glasses technology first blocks the left and then right lens, causing a momentary lag when images are shown to each eye to achieve more lifelike 3D images. The term, ‘3D Active Glasses,’ was selected as an official term by the Glasses Standardization Working Group of the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA) earlier this year.

The polarized glass method previously used in 3D glasses produced separate images for the left and right eyes, resulting in half the resolution of two-dimensional pictures as only half of the screen can be viewed through each polarized filter. Brightness was also lowered because of the polarized filter.

According to a market research firm, DisplaySearch, the 3D display market is expected to grow from $902 million in 2008 to $22 billion in 2018. The 3D TV market is expected to expand to a $17-billion market, with sales increasing from 200,000 units in 2009 to 64 million units in 2018.


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Some of the newer DLP's have excellent 1080p pictures quality. You can get a Mitsubishi WD65C9 65" (65 inch) DLP Projection HDTV for ~$1000, and they're fully 3D ready. The refresh rate is 120Hz and it has six color processing, including really dark, vibrant blacks.

It's also much more energy efficient and maintenance is cheap. If a bulb goes out, replacement is only $99. It's also compatible with the Nvidia 3D Vision goggles.

The Samsung models will be much more expensive than the DLPs, and not as great a value.

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My sister, and a Guy I work with BOTH have that 65" Mitsu DLP tv... both have problems lol.

The bulbs go out at an abnormally high rate. Like every few months. I had a projector that lasted over a year sooooooo ya know.

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This is the coolest thing i have ever seen!

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I can't wait for these to start hitting the market personally. No not because I want one. Because the prices of regular LED and LCD will drop.

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rapid1:

I can't wait for these to start hitting the market personally. No not because I want one. Because the prices of regular LED and LCD will drop.

Time to get my self a new LCD or LED for my room ;)

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I may consider one of the DLP's like you point out gibbersome as they are way more cost conscious. I just don't know if I want a 3D television though. Maybe later when the prices drop signifigantly.

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I completely agree. For the last several years HDTV was all the rage, everyone wanted one for the larger screen, the crisp resolution and the thin size. It was stylish, functional and very, very cool.

Electronics manufacturers would love to see another similar boom in the TV industry and are pitching 3DTV as the next big thing. And I don't think people are fooled. 3D tech is going to be expensive, annoying (requiring 3D glasses) and value just isn't there.

Perhaps the industry is being misled by the enormous success of the 3D extravaganza, The Avatar. Ticket sales of the movie have exceeded those of The Titanic (not adjusted for inflation) and 3D seems like a sure bet.

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My real objection is the glasses thing. I just don't see us watching movies or TV at home with 3D glasses on. I know the do 2D high def to, but whats the use. I am gonna buy a 3D TV and not watch 3D!

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The glasses system is just fine. It makes Playing HD games totally amazing. When they are your own set of glasses you can customize for comfort, to the point where its just as easy as wearing sunglasses. Although this is a gimmick to jack up the prices (production cost/ list price, is kinda the same percent as pasta in a restaurant). I guess since they are made in Korea they need something to justify an outrageous pricetag. I just wish they worked on developing a system that can be used for projectors and adaptable to all other TV's like the IMAX 3d system I have

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I've heard Nvidia's 3D Vision works remarkably well. Wearing 3D glasses to watch TV for an extended period of time might be less comfortable though. Not to mention a portion of the population has trouble with 3D, getting headaches, nauseated, etc.

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Yeah; I get that, but you guys don't have a 3 year old. I also doubt wearing glasses watching cartoons will work for her. She can't even wear sunglasses without getting curious and bending them, much less a pair she has to wear while playing and watching PBS kids.

Plus justifying the cost these are going to be 3-5 grand at least initially and I would be at least 3 is closer to what you'll see. I am glad as it adds a new market sector so it reduces prices on existing equipment standards though. Either way I'm not on the initial bus ride for this. I really wish they would have just concentrated on OLED technology than this as I think it is childish reality wise.

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