Kingston Reveals Plug-And-Play Memory Series

Kingston Reveals Plug-And-Play Memory Series

Plug-and-play, you say? Sounds good to us! Kingston Technology is back on the block with a new set of memory modules, and these are apparently even easier to get going than your average DIMM. They're the industry's first modules with Sandy Bridge-ready frequencies, and the plug-and-play nature utilizes JEDEC-compliant 1600MHz, 1866MHz values. The Hyper PnP series are designed specifically to work well with the second-generation Core i5 / i7 CPUs, and there's no BIOS tweaking needed. In addition, the modules are backwards compatible with previously released DDR3 systems on the market.

Pricing ranges from $67 for a 4GB kit to $163 for 8GB of Non-ECC in SODIMM form, and all of 'em should be on sale shortly. Looks like the memory crunch is over for you...just as soon as you dust off that credit card.

Kingston Technology Launches HyperX Plug and Play

 High Performance Memory

·         Industry’s First Modules with Faster Sandy Bridge ‘Ready’ Frequencies

·        Plug and Play Memory Uses JEDEC-compliant 1600MHz, 1866MHz Values

Fountain Valley, CA -- April 25, 2011 -- Kingston Technology Company, Inc., the independent world leader in memory products, today announced the new HyperX® Plug and Play (PnP) series of high-performance enthusiast memory. HyperX PnP are the first modules to scale the higher memory heights that are a part of the second generation Intel® Core™ i5 and i7 CPUs. The memory is programmed with faster frequencies and when ‘plugged’ into a system using the Sandy Bridge chipset, will automatically ‘play’ at either 1600MHz or 1866MHz in both desktop and notebook PCs.

            The modules are programmed using JEDEC-compliant settings, allowing 1600MHz and 1866MHz frequency support. It is as simple as plugging in the memory and turning on the machine, as the system automatically recognizes faster memory speed with no further BIOS settings required. Users will notice performance gains as overclocking is automatic with the HyperX Plug and Play modules. In addition, the modules are backwards compatible with previously released DDR3 systems on the market.

            “The HyperX engineering team has been thoroughly innovative in designing a memory module that automatically raises performance with no overclocking steps required,” said Mark Tekunoff, senior technology manager, Kingston®. “By using JEDEC-compliant settings to create performance timings, enthusiasts can max out native frequencies on current Sandy Bridge systems and older DDR3 machines.”

HyperX Plug and Play is available through Kingston’s channel of authorized distributors, resellers, e-tailers and retailers. Kingston HyperX memory is backed by a lifetime warranty and free 24/7 technical support. For more detailed product information please visit the Kingston Web site at www.kingston.com
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I wonder if this type of memory will become somewhat standard that you don't have to worry about clock speed anymore. That certainly would be a nice thing.

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I've always preferred Kingston's RAM, glad to hear they're kicking it up a notch.

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Fans of Kingston memory your choices to either upgrade or buy just got a whole heck of a lot simpler. the heatsinks are more traditional yet effective, so not too much concern re: height issues with  cpu cooler clearance. ... good pricingYes

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Neat, these should become standard :)

rrplay, how tall are they? they look standard to me.

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Inspector:

Neat, these should become standard :)

rrplay, how tall are they? they look standard to me.

yep they pretty standard that's what I meant by traditional they are NOT the taller profile sticks

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This looks like a great idea, hopefully it catches on. Legit Reviews did a nice review of the notebook memory.

http://www.legitreviews.com/article/1599/1/

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I just paid $75.00 each kit for an 8GB kit of GSKill RAM (2-4GB sticks)

$163.00 minus $75.00 is what? 16GB and change left over if you get the GSKill.

So these prices don't impress me at all. So what if you have to go into BIOS and tell it to look at your Intel XMP Profile for automatic timings setup? Is not taking this step worth paying so much more?

Not hardly,.......


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