Intel Roadmap Shows 320GB SSDs In Q4 2009

As technology enthusiasts, we all understand very clearly that bigger, better and faster is always around the bend, but this here roadmap sure makes it tough to bite on a 160GB SSD at present time. According to a slide outed by VR-Zone, Intel is planning to double the capacity of its existing SSD lineup by shifting from 50 nanometer to 34 nanometer process technology.

The future family will include a trio of capacities for the lauded X18-M and X25-M MLC (multi-level cell) solid state drives: 80GB, 160GB and 320GB. Furthermore, the high-end X25-E -- which utilizes SLC (single-level cell) tech -- will step up from the 32GB / 64GB sizes to 64GB and 128GB. Every drive mentioned here is expected to ship (or at least be announced) by Q4 of 2009, and we're also told that performance across the board should be a touch better thanks to an updated controller.

In somewhat related news, the chip maker is also planning a proper successor to its Intel Turbo Memory, which is currently codenamed Braidwood. The integrated non-volatile cache will be available in early 2010 in 4GB, 8GB and 16GB capacities, and it will also be based around 34 nanometer process technology.

Needless to say, pricing details are still months away, but you can rest assured Intel won't be giving these away. Better start digging between the couch cushions, huh?


Via:  VR-Zone
Tags:  Intel, SSD, Storage, Roadmap
Comments
peti1212 5 years ago

Now that's more like it. I want one. :) Do you guys know if it is possible to use them on older laptops. Like a 2-3 year old one? I would assume so since I don't think it uses a different platform or anything that the computer would not recognize.

Der Meister 5 years ago

very nice!

tanka12345 5 years ago

Seems that SSD capacities are improving greatly. I wonder when the 1TB mark will be hit.

bob_on_the_cob 5 years ago

[quote user="tanka12345"]

Seems that SSD capacities are improving greatly. I wonder when the 1TB mark will be hit.

[/quote]

I think in the next few years. Now that they are being produced in semi high volumes.

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