IBM And Samsung Sync Up On Semiconductor Research

IBM's news of the week involves Watson. The supercomputer just recently beat two prior Jeopardy champions, but more than just that is going on at the mega-corporation. IBM and Samsung have just announced a new joint research effort that will focus on new semiconductor technology. IBM and Samsung, putting their brains together? This could definitely lead to some pretty monumental advancements. The company is downplaying things a little bit, though, with the collaboration described as "basic research into new semiconductor materials, manufacturing processes and other technologies."


The agreement calls for the two companies to jointly develop new semiconductor process technology that can be used in a broad range of applications -- from smart phone handsets to communications infrastructure. We aren't surprised on the smartphone bit; Samsung's Galaxy S has proven extremely successful, with the company able to sell over ten million units worldwide to date. This deal marks the first time that Samsung researchers will be invited in to work with IBM's scientists in their Semiconductor Research Alliance at the Albany Nanotech Complex in upstate New York.

The research developments from this joint activity are planned to enable the delivery of industry leading silicon solutions that are optimized for performance, power consumption and size, which sounds like just the thing needed to compete with Intel's Sandy Bridge / Oak Trail and AMD's Fusion. New process technology developed by the companies is planned to extend leadership in mobile computing as well as other high performance applications. For consumers, a new generation of devices -- smarter, connected and more mobile -- will require essential semiconductor breakthroughs to keep pace with technology trends. All of this is still very vague, but that's generally how partnerships start. Once these two really get on the same page, there's no telling what'll happen. We do suspect that the outcome will be quite positive for consumers, though.

IBM and Samsung Announce Joint Research into New Semiconductor Technology

Companies' scientists to jointly develop semiconductor technology to enable powerful, energy-efficient chips for new mobile devices and IT infrastructure

ALBANY, N.Y. & SEOUL, South Korea - 12 Jan 2011: IBM and Samsung today announced they will collaborate on basic research into new semiconductor materials, manufacturing processes and other technologies. The agreement calls for the two companies to jointly develop new semiconductor process technology that can be used in a broad range of applications -- from smart phone handsets to communications infrastructure.

For the first time, Samsung researchers will join IBM scientists in the Semiconductor Research Alliance at the Albany Nanotech Complex, Albany, N.Y., where researchers will investigate new materials and transistor structures, as well as innovative interconnect and packaging solutions for next-generation technology nodes. The research developments from this joint activity are planned to enable the delivery of industry leading silicon solutions that are optimized for performance, power consumption and size.

“We are pleased to have our top-level scientists involved with the cutting-edge research that’s taking place at the Albany Nanotech Center,” said ES Jung, senior vice president of technology development, System LSI Division, Samsung Electronics. “This should further enhance our joint efforts to continue technology leadership well into the future.”

New process technology developed by the companies is planned to extend leadership in mobile computing as well as other high performance applications. For consumers, a new generation of devices -- smarter, connected and more mobile -- will require essential semiconductor breakthroughs to keep pace with technology trends (i.e. the mobile web, cloud computing,) and users' loftier expectations around performance and reliability.

"Collaborative innovation will be critical if the semiconductor industry is to continue driving new forms of consumer electronics and new methods of computing," said Michael Cadigan, general manager, IBM Microelectronics. "That's why we're excited to have Samsung scientists working with us at the most fundamental stages of the R&D process."

The agreement also renews IBM and Samsung's joint process development agreement (JDA) to multiple nodes starting at 20nm. IBM and Samsung plan to develop advanced technologies for foundry customers, enabling high-performance, energy-efficient chips at 20nm and beyond. To further enhance the JDA, Samsung’s Semiconductor R&D center will also participate in development contribution.

Solutions for CMOS technology at 20-nanometers and beyond will be presented at the Common Platform Technology forum on January 18, 2011 at Santa Clara Convention center. Forum details can be found at www.commonplatform.com.
Via:  IBM
Tags:  Samsung, smartphone, IBM, CPU, Chip
Comments
3vi1 3 years ago

>> The supercomputer just recently beat two prior Jeopardy champions,

Barely, in a short 15 minute practice round. The actual contest has yet to happen.

I still think it's unfair for the computer to get the question digitally as text, instead of having to listen to Alex and OCR the board. It speeds its reaction time.

rapid1 3 years ago

That is very true 3vi1, I have not thought of it that way, although if you think of it as a standard nature of input, then a human would do it verbally, while a computer would do it in another method (digitally), it would really be more of a test of the OCR technology/software they use more than anything in the method your speaking of.

This joining of IBM and Samsung (being the largest memory manufacturer) seems to be significant to me. If you would remember when IBM/Big blue decided at one time to do a joint research project with another manufacturer named Intel the products produced were pretty significant. Of course many other people had been and were in the market as well, but without there singular device we would basically not be in the information age at all really.

So I applaud both of them for coming to terms on something like this, not to mention IBM has never stopped developing chips, throughput methods, data string methodology etc either, and as far as Samsung goes without them I imagine DDR3 would not be in most of our computers, and our video cards would not have DDR4/5 either. Heck if you think of it most of the high end components that make up PC's/Laptops/Mp3 players/Netbooks/Tablets/Smartphones and on and on would have no reason to exist either.

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