Harman Kardon SB 16 Soundbar + Subwoofer Simplifies Home Audio - HotHardware
Harman Kardon SB 16 Soundbar + Subwoofer Simplifies Home Audio

Harman Kardon SB 16 Soundbar + Subwoofer Simplifies Home Audio

Is the surround sound system dead? Not quite, but it's not nearly as necessary as it was just five years ago. At that point, running miles of speaker cable around your den was a dreadful requirement to get legitimate surround sound, but audio technologies have evolved quite substantially in the span of just a few years. Sound bars in particular offer a great balance; there's the compromise of not actually having 5, 6 or 7 independent speakers, but the size and ease of installation usually makes up for that.

Harman Industries are today introducing the new Harman Kardon SB 16 2.1-channel soundbar home theater speaker system. This system is designed for those seeking great surround sound, but aren't willing to go all-out with a multi-speaker system. It's comprised of a single amplified loudspeaker unit connected directly to your television, DVD player or game console, and a single wireless subwoofer that you may place anywhere in the room. There are no wires to sweat, and the bar itself features two-way, dual-driver, left and right soundbar speaker channels, each with two 3-inch (75mm) midrange drivers and a 3/4-inch (19mm) dome tweeter. The sleek and glossy wireless subwoofer is driven by 100 watts of power and boasts a 10-inch (250mm) driver within a ported enclosure. The soundbar amplifier power boasts 25W x 2 into 8 ohms, 20Hz to 20kHz, at <0.07% THD, when both channels are driven simultaneously.

The bar is also smart. It can be programmed to obey your TV remote’s volume, power and source commands, enabling a single remote to control your whole home theater system. There's also an EQ switch lets you adjust the soundbar’s bass for wall mounting or table mounting to deliver the most natural-sounding bass performance in any installation. And finally, an auto turn-on circuit automatically switches the subwoofer from “standby” to “on” when an audio signal is present.

The SB 16 will ship soon in black, with an MSRP of $599.99.

Big Sound, Great Ease, Fewer Wires: New
harman kardon® SB 16 Connects Home Cinema Sound Directly to Your TV
The home theater soundbar system features single speaker bar and wireless subwoofer for an elegant, simple setup process at home
For more information: www.harmankardon.com/SB16

STAMFORD, Conn. – HARMAN International Industries, Incorporated (NSYE: HAR), today announced the release of the new harman kardon® SB 16 2.1-channel soundbar home theater speaker system.

Home theater installations typically involve five loudspeakers, a subwoofer or two, and lots of speaker wire. Not every room can accommodate so many components, and not every homeowner wants to live with them. The harman kardon home cinema soundbar system offers an elegant and far simpler alternative: a single amplified loudspeaker unit connected directly to your television, DVD player or game console, and a single wireless subwoofer that you may place anywhere in the room.

Offering traditional stereo playback or realistic 3-D surround-sound processing, the SB 16 delivers true harman kardon performance with the absolute minimum number of components, and with no wires in (or out of) sight.

The SB 16 delivers exceptional sonic performance that can flood a room with a completely rich surround-sound experience from just one speaker. The soundbar features two-way, dual-driver, left and right soundbar speaker channels, each with two 3-inch (75mm) midrange drivers and a 3/4-inch (19mm) dome tweeter. The sleek and glossy wireless subwoofer is driven by 100 watts of power and boasts a 10-inch (250mm) driver within a ported enclosure. The soundbar amplifier power boasts 25W x 2 into 8 ohms, 20Hz to 20kHz, at <0.07% THD, when both channels are driven simultaneously. State-of-the-art harman kardon sound-processing technology includes a 3-D virtual speaker surround mode that creates a complete surround-sound experience without any extra speakers or wires.

“To design an elegant technological solution that is convenient to use and can operate seamlessly within its environment is one of the biggest goals that drive us here at HARMAN,” said David Slump, president, HARMAN Consumer Division. “The brand-new harman kardon SB 16 is proof of our continual passion for this goal.”

The SB 16 also includes key features that make it more convenient when instruction manuals, cords and remotes constantly fill up our living rooms. For example, the new soundbar is programmable so that it can obey your TV remote’s volume, power and source commands, enabling a single remote to control your whole home theater system. An EQ switch lets you adjust the soundbar’s bass for wall mounting or table mounting to deliver the most natural-sounding bass performance in any installation. And last but not least, an auto turn-on circuit automatically switches the subwoofer from “standby” to “on” when an audio signal is present.

Pricing and Availability

The harman kardon SB 16 is available in black and has a suggested retail price of $599.99. For additional information or to purchase, visit www.harmankardon.com/SB16. 
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Sure these might sound great... but its NOwhere near what an actual 5 speaker set up sounds like. I think the best all in one sound bar i've hear so far is the Yamaha one with over 20 tweeters or something.

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coolice:
Sure these might sound great... but its NOwhere near what an actual 5 speaker set up sounds like. I think the best all in one sound bar i've hear so far is the Yamaha one with over 20 tweeters or something.

The Yamaha costs a heck of a lot more than this does though. I'll bet that this Harman Kardon system sounds good,....bit IT'S too expensive to start with.

 

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True say realneil, 600$, i think your good buying some paradigm bookshelf speakers and a basic amp. Will do wonders over stock tv speakers + you'll get a ton of inputs.

If your smart and know what your shopping for, you can purchase a full HTS from Polk Audio, Energy + a few more i cant think of. Personally... and i dont want to call myself an audiophile, but i do enjoy and notice good sound, i wouldnt consider these. I'd rather pick up a used pair of tower speakers and upgrade slowly.

At the moment i'm running a pair of Sinclair Audio sb3600bt's with a matching center speaker powered by a standard yamaha amp, nothing too fancy and it performs as well as the paradigm monitor 9... i spent about 500$ (well, my old man did) about 3 years ago.

The best way to buy a speaker system, regardless of what make/ design it is... is to get yoo bum to the store and audition! some people can live with koss/rca home theatre systems... some want the 100k neighbour annoying, cop inviting system.

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I use a Bose Home Theater system in the living room and an Onkyo system in the bedroom. They work OK for me. Losing my hearing slowly over time from working on Flight Lines during the B1 Bomber days. Even with good hearing protection on, those things were unbelievably loud. Now I don't hear so well so my hearing aids really affect my listening experience.

My wife says that they both sound great! Big Smile

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B1 Bomber days... Realneil, your older than my old man and yet you know more about computers than i do.

As for sort of losing your hearing... theres always a positive side to that. If ever your wife starts nagging you to clean the garage or attic (i know my mum drives me crazy sometimes to clean my room) i have to remind her that the room is not messy, its just organized to my standards... anywho, before i go off topic... at least you can naturally block most of that out and just nod your hear every 10 - 15 seconds haha. whereas i need to listen to it all and still nod my head haha. 

 

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coolice:
at least you can naturally block most of that out and just nod your head every 10 - 15 seconds

The problem with that is that I'm finally married to someone that I want to listen to. Smile

Computers have always intrigued me. I worked with huge room sized computers that had IBM card stock data readers and magnetic tapes on spools while I was on the Space Shuttle program with Rockwell International.

I've owned PC's dating from the IBM 8088 12MHz. with 256 Kilobytes of RAM and a 30 Megabyte RLL Seagate Hard Drive in it. Ram came in Plastic Tubes back then and you had to have a little steel device that looked like a tiny rake to pry CPU's and Co Processors out of their sockets.

Over the years, I've just tried to keep up. That's all.

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Oh man... I dont even know what most of those are. RLL hard drive? as for plastic tube rams, i've seen those in our libaray history dept. haha.

And a little rake to pry up the cpu?? woah thats old.. Never heard of that procedure before. Some time in the future i'll be telling my offspring i used to use a keybaord to type, and they'll say WHAT!! You could only type 65 words/ minute! How did you ever complete your assignments!!

To which i'll reply, we used to actually google and search for our assignments on the internet, you kids havnt ever done that have you??  hehe

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Ah this takes me back my first PC that was mine and not shared with others in my home was an 8086, later replaced with a 486DX that at the time I thought was unimaginably fast.

 

Whats funny to me is the 486 still runs. I know this because after I read your post I went over to the storage locker I have in the basement here to dig it out and check.  Has been a really long time since I saw Windows 3.1.

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