Filesharing Takes A Seat In European Parliament - HotHardware
Filesharing Takes A Seat In European Parliament

Filesharing Takes A Seat In European Parliament

Sweden's PiratePartiet (Pirate Party) has secured a win for the European Parliament in yesterday's Swedish European Parliament Elections, becoming - at least in this election - Sweden's 4th biggest party.

According to official sources, the
Pirate Party secured 7.1% of votes and elected to the European Parliament Christian Engstrom to voice the concerns of filesharers and throughout Europe. Thanks to the Swedish authority's enforcement of a court mandate and shutting down the Pirate Bay, the attempt at restricting the activity of filesharing has backfired and provided a soapbox of sorts for the Party.

The Pirate Party's arguments are towards the "reform of copyright law", by making non-commercial use free to users and limit the commercial life of copyrighted material and pharmaceutical patents in particular. A general ban on DRM technologies and any contract clause that limits the user's rights are also on the Pirate agenda. The fact that Swedish youths have enjoyed next-gen internet connections and are brought up in a very

This is one of those things that could only originate in Europe. While the rest of the world is finding ways to implement and enforce data and copyright protection, the Swedes are up in arms trying to give copyrights a deadline.

Just last month, France proposed to implement a three-strikes policy for users caught file-sharing. The EU Comission deemed that it restricted civil liberties and freedom of speech, throwing out the proposal. France, in their very own way, ignored the European Comission's decision and went ahead, giving authorities sweeping powers to enforce control over filesharing, including within ISPs.

Unsurprisingly, Pirate Parties are popping up left right and centre across the world while French Pirates (historically, some of the most successful ones) are getting organised.

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While I agree that the copyright laws need reform to fit the digital age I don't think everything being free is the right way. I'm not sure I know the answer, but I am watching stuff like this with intrest.

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Go Pirate Party!!!

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I agree.  I think what's happening now will define the future of file sharing as we know it.  I also think it will break boundaries in addressing the people.

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bob_on_the_cob:

While I agree that the copyright laws need reform to fit the digital age I don't think everything being free is the right way. I'm not sure I know the answer, but I am watching stuff like this with intrest.

I agree with you probably in many respects. I'm not too familiar with the U.S copyright scene but in Europe things have gone too far. I would imagine the 'pharmaceutical' copyrights they are referencing are the patents on the biological washing detergents (simple germs that eat dirt etc. ). i.e., some corporation essentially managed to copyright the blueprints to basic life. If your stomach started producing these bacteria you would be infringing copyright. (Obviously wouldn't happen but I think you get my drift).

The other problem I have is treating torrenting technology like some serious weapon that normal citizens shouldn't have access to because it caters to an illegal activity but thats like saying we should ban photocopiers because they allow people to copy books (and I'm sure people do use it for that). In Ireland for instance the main ISP is called Eircom and the MPAA and RIAA made them sign a deal where they cancel their customers accounts if found to be using torrents! Yes, they can cancel my broadband subscription if they find me using torrents. What does that mean, well either they don't care if I'm using it legally or check if my data is illegal. Either way, they either invade my privacy or disconnect me for not doing anything wrong. Sound fair? Its especially wrong when I say that Eircom pretty much has a monopoly in the country, they are like the Microsoft of ten years ago, I can't just switch. 

I'm all for artists and creative people being paid for their work. However there are flaws in our current copyright legislation e.g. copyright is suppose to have a lifespan, so that it protects and encourages creativity however in some circumstances they (legislators) are allowing for loopholes and red tape to extend certain patents ensuring it has the opposite effect and essentially protects 'monopolies'. We need compromise, the digital age has changed many things. We will have to rethink how we view many issues. Copyright is one of them. I can assure you this is only the start, in the next EU election there may well be another few pirate MEPs as more pirate parties spring up in other countries. 

 

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Wow, I did not know that was/is going on (part of only one ISP and the torrent bit.)  In addition to all of this, I also read that Germany wants to ban all violent video games, which includes all production.  The article I read said that companies like Crytek would either have to move or outsource...  It seems like a nutty time in Europe.

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