Don't Feed Trolls: U.S. Government Is 'Arguing' With Terrorists On Social Media - HotHardware
Don't Feed Trolls: U.S. Government Is 'Arguing' With Terrorists On Social Media

Don't Feed Trolls: U.S. Government Is 'Arguing' With Terrorists On Social Media

The U.S. government might not negotiate with terrorists, but it is willing to use social media as a tool to engage in conversation with jihadists and their sympathizers online. Why bother? The U.S. government hopes that it can convince potential terrorists to go in another direction. It's an ugly world the government's stepping into, but can it work?

"We are actually giving al Qaeda the benefit of the doubt because we are answering their arguments," Alberto Fernandez, coordinator of the State Department's Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications (CSCC), tells CNN. "The way I see it is we are participating in the marketplace of ideas."

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It's not a job for the faint of heart or anyone who can't stomach seeing the horrors of terrorist activities. There are photos of combatants holding heads of decapitated victims, videos of group executions, and other atrocities. It's because of these horrific acts that the government is willing to argue theologies on social media, but it also puts into perspective the type of people they're dealing with. The argument against these efforts is that the government is feeding the trolls, so to speak. Anyone who's ever engaged in an online argument knows this concept well.

Apparently this has been going on for the past three years. According to CNN, our government has been posting social media messages in Arabic, Urdu, and Somali arguing against the theologies of jihadists. It's just now drawing attention -- and criticism -- because of the recent launch of an English-language Twitter account. Some of the exchanges that are taking place have boiled down to little more than back-and-forth bickering.

What do you think about all this? Should the U.S. government use social media to engage in discussions and argue with terrorists, or does only add fuel to the fire?

Thumbnail Image Source: Flickr (bbyrd009)
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The U.S. would be engaging with True Believers, not trolls, and I don't like its chances of success. I tried a few times myself years ago only to be met with a great deal of Ad hominem. They're obstinately irrational, conspiratorial, and see themselves as part of a tight knit family of "brother and "sisters" of the Faith which is Islam. They're very hard to reason with. I suppose a less violent interpretation of Islam is the gist of what the U.S government would be pushing. That's something I can't do with any conviction since I hold to an atheist philosophy.

FYI, a troll is an individual who, with no ideological or emotional investment in either side, gets two groups of people engaged in a phlegm throwing contest against one another, the sole purpose of which is so he can sit back and be entertained by the conflict he has wrought.

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You're doing it wrong Guppy. It isn't about the "True Believer" you're engaging it's about the audience. If you can keep your posts short and readable while making the true believer look stupid or lose their temper then the audience with see that. It removes the veneer of invincibility in the mind of the reader. Remember: lurkers always outnumber posters. It's the audience not the poster. (pats Guppy on his pointy head) Now run along my little defeated friend....see?...it works.....)

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Seems to me, from experience on Usenet watching others argue with tax protesters, holocaust deniers, etc., that the objective is not to convince the direct opponents in the debate, as they are usually inconsolable "true believers." Rather, it is to convince third-party observers who may be sitting on the fence and deciding which side to take. Sometimes you may have to walk a fine line between not giving an undeserving audience to trolls on one hand, versus leaving dangerous ideas and advice unrebutted on the other.

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