Diamond Introduces First 1GB Radeon HD 3870

Diamond Introduces First 1GB Radeon HD 3870

Introducing the First 1 Gigabyte HD 3870 Graphics Card

CHATSWORTH, CA — April 15, 2008 — Diamond Multimedia (www.diamondmm.com), a leading manufacturer of PC graphics cards, sound cards and communications products, introduced today the 1 gigabyte, overclocked version of the ATI Radeon HD 3870 graphics card.  This card offers maximum speed and power at an incredible value.  Utilizing 55nm technology, this card runs cool and quiet.

Diamond was the first AIB for AMD to launch a consumer based 1GB card with the HD 2900 XT. Today, we stand alone to again to be the first AIB to offer the HD 3870 1GB. The performance itself matches against Nvidia new line of 9xxx series, as well against the HD 3870 X2.

The HD 3870 is a dual slot card, PCIE 2.0, with 1024MB of DDR3 memory and an overclocked  speed of 825 MHz.  The memory speed is 900 MHz.  As with the original HD 3870, the 1 gigabyte version is designed with 320 stream processors and plug-and-play ATI CrossFireX upgradeability with up to quad-GPU support.

The Radeon HD 3870 will blow users away with life-like graphics from the latest Microsoft® DirectX® 10.1 games and stunning 3D graphics and shading effects. Experience the best of Windows Vista and bump up the performance of the Windows Aero graphical interface.

Uncompromising HD video is delivered via ATI Avivo display technology.  The latest Blu-ray and HD DVD movies play smoothly at full 1080p with a dedicated hardware video decoder that leaves your CPU unbound to do other tasks.  Enjoy digital content with HDMI and built in 5.1 surround sound. 

All Diamond video cards carry the Diamond guarantee of quality assurance. Unlike many cards that are simply first to market, Diamond carefully tests and retests every new model for its ratio of performance to reliability. Diamond is legendary in the PC video card business for its less than 1 percent return rate versus an industry average of approximately 10 percent. Diamond cards use superior connectors, cables and components, as well as undergo more thorough testing for heat susceptibility and durability.

Availability
Diamond Multimedia’s ATI Radeon HD 3870 will ship immediately and will be fully optimized with xDNA software.  All Diamond cards are available through North American distributors, such as ASI, D&H, Ingram Micro, Synnex and TechData.  They can also be found at most leading computer retailers and e-commerce sites.

About Diamond Multimedia
Diamond provides the absolute best quality in advanced graphics, digital television, communications and sound hardware solutions for home and business users, enabling users to create, access and experience compelling new media content from their desktops. Diamond products stand for performance, quality and value.

For the past two decades, Diamond Multimedia has been widely recognized as a pioneer in the graphics, sound and communications industries and as a key player in launching the multimedia revolution. Diamond is a new type of multimedia company that brings all of the differing technologies together under one brand. Diamond Multimedia is partnered with some of the top technology companies, including AMD, as an ATI graphics provider.

Diamond products are available to the public throughout North America through retailers, resellers and systems integrators, as well as, top technology product distributors. Corporate headquarters are located in Chatsworth, California.

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I doubt it will make a lot of difference.  The 1GB versions of the 2900XT didn't do much.  I suppose at very high resolutions with AA and AF there may be slight benefit, but if it costs more, the user is probably better off buying a different type of card altogether. 

The benchmarks I have seen support my speculations.

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 It probably won't make a bit of difference to the average user, but people will buy it anyways because it's ohmygosh 1GB. I've seen 1GB versions of the 8600GT being sold too! 

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Yeah, people love to buy the higher memory cards.  Sometimes it makes a difference, ie 320 or 640 for the old GTS, but when they give the really weak GPUs 512mb or even 1gb I scratch my head.  The 3870 is by no measure a weak GPU, but 1024mb is a little overkill.  But hey, at least you know you'll never be memory capacity limitted.

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When I was a novice hardware consumer I looked at memory size as good better and best...I didn't look at core clocks, or series.  If I could get a 32MB card for about the same price as a 16MB card, I would go for the higher memory.  Many consumers may still be this way.  If it has more memory, it must be better, and 1 gig of memory is DOUBLE 512!  Double the speed!  Hell Yeah!

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sometimes too much memory adversly affects gaming speed

best example is the 9800 :-p  (radeon 9800 not the new nvidia...)

its like if you are managing anything. if you manage too much you do poorly. 

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How was there too much memory on the Radeon 9800 family?  The Pro could have 256mb and the XT always had 256mb and I do not think it was overkill.  Side by side benchmark compaisons between 128mb and 256mb versions of the Pro showed that the latter performed better.

1GB on the 3870 is questionable, but at least reasonable because it's a fast card.  This 3650 is too ridiculous. 

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 http://www.nordichardware.com/Reviews/?page=9&skrivelse=328

for a card that was an extra 150 dollars, the 1-2 fps difference doesnt amount to anything. heck you could overclock 10mhz and get the extra 1-2 fps boost.

the 128 mb 9800 was the best bet. the 256 was too expensive for only a fraction of performance increase.  

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I guess at the time.  But I know one friend who bought a 9800 Pro 256mb around 2005 and only paid an extra $20 for the extra memory, and it was worth it since he played Battlefield 2, a game that demands all the MBs you can give it.

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Crisis Causer:

I guess at the time.  But I know one friend who bought a 9800 Pro 256mb around 2005 and only paid an extra $20 for the extra memory, and it was worth it since he played Battlefield 2, a game that demands all the MBs you can give it.



i know for a fact that 2005 was way way way after the 9800 came out :-)

well anyway for an extra 20 its plausable, and for that game i might have made an improvment, but every benchmark ive seen show only a negligable 1-3 fps boost. which again could be atributed to margin of error/better chip etc etc..

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vicaphit:

When I was a novice hardware consumer I looked at memory size as good better and best...I didn't look at core clocks, or series.  If I could get a 32MB card for about the same price as a 16MB card, I would go for the higher memory.  Many consumers may still be this way.  If it has more memory, it must be better, and 1 gig of memory is DOUBLE 512!  Double the speed!  Hell Yeah!

 

 

I think it also doesn't help that the requirements on the video game box are using this method. I have the Call of Duty 4 box sitting in front of me and it says "3d Hardware Accelerator Card Required-100% Direct X9.0C compatible 128MB Hardware Accelerator video card and the latest drivers" under the Minimum System Requirements. Though under Hardware Requirements, it gets a little more specific and says GeForce 6600 or Radeon 9800Pro or better.

So for the reader, it would be easier to measure/compare numbers for RAM because it is right there on the box. It is easier than looking at the "history" of graphics cards and their benchmarks to figure out which is better.

I'm sure many other games do this. 

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Having RAM requirements on a game is crucial though.  You can't run Crysis on a card with 64mb of Ram, not because it will go slow, but because it wouldn't be able to load everything.

 Maybe they should have a suggested clock speed, or pixel pipeline amount listed as well as memory amounts.

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 and to think I had always thought of Diamond as a Business graphics card company.

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vicaphit:

Having RAM requirements on a game is crucial though.  You can't run Crysis on a card with 64mb of Ram, not because it will go slow, but because it wouldn't be able to load everything.

 Maybe they should have a suggested clock speed, or pixel pipeline amount listed as well as memory amounts.

 

 

I am not saying it isn't crucial. I'm just saying that it isn't a good way to talk about requirements because it has become a way to wrongly compare video cards. Suggested clock speed and pixel pipeline would be better but I think it is still not good enough. A prime example is how AMD and Nvidia with their different stream processors. If it was based on numbers, AMD would win as they have way more stream processors than Nvidia. But Nvidia's SP's are different/more efficient so you can't compare both based on numbers alone. 

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