Cooler Than Water, The Liquid Metal Heat Sink

Cooler Than Water, The Liquid Metal Heat Sink

Even in the age of green computing and lower power 45nm silicon manufacturing technologies, thermal management, specifically heat mitigation, continues to be a challenge .   Maybe you're a dyed-in-the-wool overclocker or perhaps a silent computing buff that wants things whisper-quiet. Then again, even the average "Joe Sixpack" could probably appreciate how unobtrusive a computer can be and that, as savvy HH readers know, can only be achieved through robust, elegant cooling solutions.  In that vein and out of the Kingdom of Denmark comes Danamics with the LM10, the world's first commercially available liquid metal-based CPU heatsink.  What's that you say?  Liquid metal?  Indeed liquid metal, son.  Black gold, Texas Tea... or something like that.

  


 
Courtesy:  Danamics ApS

In addition, Danamics highlights that their technology utilizes an electromagnetic pump for circulating the liquid metal (makes sense) and this also has the added benefits of having no moving parts, emitting zero noise and a claimed unlimited MTBF (mean-time between failure).  Danamics also claims the LM10 has the lowest thermal resistance of any air-cooler on the market currently.  They also claim the LM10 exceeds most water coolers on the market, all in a single, sealed unit without external reservoirs or additional components.  Finally, the power draw of the LM10 is noted to be less than 1W. 

On a side note, your first thought might be that the liquid metal substance used in this cooler is Mercury.  However, we'd suggest it's likely an amorphous liquid metal alloy like Vitreloy or similar.  We've reached out to Danamics and will advise on this if further information is available.

So let's add this up again.  Low noise, low power consumption, cools better than water, stand-alone unit -- only one question remains and one task is at hand.  How much does it cost and when will the first sample arrive at the HotHardware Labs?  Stay tuned, we'll try to answer those questions and whether or not the LM10 can live up to its claims, in the weeks ahead.  What do you think?  Does this new technology have promise?

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What I wanna know is when can I actually get one.

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Wow realneil that's a price dang a high or mid high end video card or a CPU

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News:
out of the Kingdom of Denmark comes Danamics with the LM10, the world's first commercially available liquid metal-based CPU heatsink. 

I found an old article about liquid metal cooling on the internet, so apparently this isn't really all that new. Take a look at THIS.

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Lots of good info in that link. Thanks!

 

It isn't new, and that is why that had to add "first commercially available" to their statement. hehe

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Thanks for the link super dave can't wait to get more info on this woot no reservoir or refills and works better than water but whats the release info on this thing will I have to wait till I get my 12 core cpu or what and if they adapt it for graphics or even a board cooler like the DRMOS ASUS passive board coolers will be awesome

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Well folks. the liquid metal in question is mixture of SODIUM and POTASIUM.

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Wow, that's so sick I want one!

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This never became available for sale in the US. In England it's going for £174.99 = $282.21 american dollars. European review sites say it's the very best high performance cooler they've ever tested. For $282 it should wash the clothes and take out the trash too.

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NaK (Sodium Potassium alloy) is highly reactive with air or water and must be handled with special precautions. Quantities as small as one gram can be a fire or explosion risk. One notable use is as the coolant in experimental fast neutron nuclear reactors (i.e. Reactors that convert uranium into plutonium).

The safety issues is probably what kept this from making it to the US. A small leak and you'd have a liquid that forms a yellow potassium superoxide coating and may ignite. This superoxide reacts explosively with organics.

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I really think that these would only be useful on high OC's or supercomputers, that being said, the NaK is way more dangerous than LN2 or LHe. I can't see the government allowing it to be imported.

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don't see why you would need something like this...

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That would stand to reason. Metal has a much higher heat conductivity than water does. One reason why if you vacated the boiling water out of your frying pan, it would cool a lot quicker than the water. Sodium and Potassium are also very reactive to water.

The $282.21 isn't too bad at all, considering the high performance Koolance cooling system costs a little more. However, I don't know what kind of hazards you'd run into by installing a metal cooling system. As Soupstyle mentioned, perhaps this is one reason it's not being sold in the US as yet.

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I have actually done some checking into this thing. It looks like a very promising cooling technology for sure. I have never heard anything about it on availability though. I even tried to contact the company once. I don't recall hearing anything back though.

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